• I’ll be back: from Terminator to Grease, LA’s most iconic bridge gets a thrilling sequel on seismic springs

    I’ll be back: from Terminator to Grease, LA’s most iconic bridge gets a thrilling sequel on seismic springs
    The Sixth Street Bridge was the gritty go-to location for dance-offs, shoot-outs and car chases until it was torn down. Can the $500m rebuild bring back the fun of the freeway – and unite a divided city?It has starred in more car chases than Vin Diesel, more stunt scenes than Tom Cruise and more music videos than Madonna, and yet it never even had to audition for a part. Leaping across the Los Angeles river on its twin steel arcs, held aloft by its majestic art deco concrete pillars, the S
  • A slice of Silicon Valley – inside the RCA’s colossal new £135m building

    A slice of Silicon Valley – inside the RCA’s colossal new £135m building
    The Royal College of Art’s brutalist new building – by architects Herzog & de Meuron – reflects a shift from art school to science-tech powerhouse. But is a business-facing behemoth what its students really need?
    Standing like the brutalist lovechild of a factory and a multi-storey car park, the Royal College of Art’s colossal new studio building in Battersea is an arresting thing to behold. Its brawny brick flanks extend for 120 metres down the street in an unbroken
  • Andras Kaldor obituary

    Andras Kaldor obituary
    My friend Andras Kaldor, who has died aged 83, was an architect, writer, artist and gallery owner in Dartmouth, Devon. A refugee from Hungary, he was steeped in both western and eastern European tradition.Andras was born and raised in Budapest, son of Margit (nee Gazdag) and Andras Kaldor, an engineer. He attended the Petofi Gimnazium school in Budapest. Aged 18, he rebelled against the government, which was backed by Russian forces, in the 1956 revolution and escaped from Hungary with a group o
  • ‘Really cool, day or night’: readers’ top modern European architecture

    ‘Really cool, day or night’: readers’ top modern European architecture
    From a giant Gulliver in Spain to a sleek basking whale in Budapest, readers tip 10 destinations with stunning contemporary buildingsThe Hamsun Centre in Hamarøy, northern Norway (a couple of hours by boat from Bodø), is dedicated to Norway’s most famous novelist, Knut Hamsun (1859-1952), hailed by many as the father of modern Norwegian literature. Designed by the American architect Steven Holl, the striking building, which dominates the landscape for miles, offers references
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  • Henrietta Howard’s historic Georgian villa to open to public after restoration

    Henrietta Howard’s historic Georgian villa to open to public after restoration
    Decades of disrepair reversed at Marble Hill, home built on the Thames for king’s mistress and court society figure“There is a greater court now at Marble Hill than at Kensington,” the poet Alexander Pope wrote in 1735. Now, the historic Georgian villa in west London belonging to Henrietta Howard, the Countess of Sussex, is to reopen following decades of ruin.Though mainly known as King George II’s mistress, Howard was a remarkable woman in her own right, overcoming perso
  • Queer Spaces by Adam Nathaniel Thurman and Joshua Mardell review – a fascinating LGBTQIA+ architecture history

    Queer Spaces by Adam Nathaniel Thurman and Joshua Mardell review – a fascinating LGBTQIA+ architecture history
    From clubs and pubs to aristocratic follies, from an Indian theatre to a Cuban ice-cream parlour, this creative book is a hymn to the gay-friendly buildings treasured by film-makers, artists and activistsFonthill Abbey in Wiltshire is one of the great lost wonders of British architecture, a neo-gothic giant with cathedral-sized interiors, built from 1796 to 1813, whose 90-metre tower collapsed and was rebuilt several times. It fell for the last time in 1825, since when the rest of the building h
  • Queer Spaces by Adam Nathaniel Furman and Joshua Mardell review – a fascinating LGBTQIA+ architecture history

    Queer Spaces by Adam Nathaniel Furman and Joshua Mardell review – a fascinating LGBTQIA+ architecture history
    From clubs and pubs to aristocratic follies, from an Indian theatre to a Cuban ice-cream parlour, this creative book is a hymn to the gay-friendly buildings treasured by film-makers, artists and activistsFonthill Abbey in Wiltshire is one of the great lost wonders of British architecture, a neo-gothic giant with cathedral-sized interiors, built from 1796 to 1813, whose 90-metre tower collapsed and was rebuilt several times. It fell for the last time in 1825, since when the rest of the building h
  • Homerton College, Cambridge dining hall: good enough to eat in

    Homerton College, Cambridge dining hall: good enough to eat in
    All drama on the outside, full of delicacy within, Feilden Fowles’s daring design for Cambridge’s most diverse college provides a bright, harmonious space that revels in the detailsWell this is a treat. A new building that is serious and responsible – the Keir Starmer virtues, you could say; adjectives that might be synonyms for dull – that is also sumptuous and surprising, that takes delight in the things that architecture is made of, in materials, space, light and craft
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  • The geometric beauty of Singapore’s social housing tables – in pictures

    The geometric beauty of Singapore’s social housing tables – in pictures
    Despite living in social housing all his life, Singapore-based photography hobbyist Jonathan Tan never took much notice of the geometric wonders in front of him. Then, for his 2020 project Lepak Downstairs, he used an iPhone and a selfie stick to capture the old, tiled concrete stools and tables found throughout Singapore’s housing estates. “Singaporeans are so used to these sights and we start taking them for granted, but it’s nice to see people appreciating everyday spots aga
  • On my radar: Marwa al-Sabouni’s cultural highlights

    On my radar: Marwa al-Sabouni’s cultural highlights
    The Syrian architect and writer on the idea of home in Branagh’s Belfast, smart Arab horses in Homs and the joy of lentils in DamascusMarwa al-Sabouni is a Syrian architect and writer. Born in Homs in 1981, she was living in the city when the civil war broke out in 2011 and remained there with her young family throughout the worst bombardments. In her memoir The Battle for Home, published in 2016, al-Sabouni wrote about the vital role that architecture plays in the functioning of society a
  • How we remodelled our 1950s semi in Kent into a bright and breezy beach house

    How we remodelled our 1950s semi in Kent into a bright and breezy beach house
    Inspired by its seaside location, this architect couple took inspiration from Australian beach houses In 2018, architects Sonya Flynn and Mark Baker had just finished remodelling a large, 1970s house on a north Kent seafront for a client when a smaller house down the road came on the market. During the project, they had fallen in love with the location: the shingle beach, the uninterrupted sea views and spectacular, year-round sunsets.The unprepossessing 1950s semi in Tankerton, Whitstable, hadn
  • Australia’s most sustainable houses – in pictures

    Australia’s most sustainable houses – in pictures
    From a tiny home in Tasmania to a sprawling multigenerational manor inspired by camping, the Houses awards have chosen a shortlist of this year’s most sustainable architectureGet our weekend culture and lifestyle email and listen to our podcast Continue reading...
  • ‘We didn’t think they’d use the animals as trampolines’ – Assemble unleash squidgy mayhem

    ‘We didn’t think they’d use the animals as trampolines’ – Assemble unleash squidgy mayhem
    The Turner prize-winning collective have brought the spirit of Lina Bo Bardi to Nottingham, thrilling kids with the shamefully neglected Brazilian architect’s visions of play A gigantic green ball is on the loose, being herded around by a gang of schoolchildren, who gleefully speed it towards a circle of squishy foam animals, crashing into a projector hanging from the ceiling along the way. Other kids leap between the vinyl-covered creatures, hopping from turtle to tiger, while one boy beg
  • Welcome to the jungle: inside Mexico’s groundbreaking natural art gallery

    Welcome to the jungle: inside Mexico’s groundbreaking natural art gallery
    Part building, part tropical grove, this forest art space in the Yucatan peninsula is a living, breathing masterpiece of its own Walking in, it is hard to tell where the jungle ends and the building begins. Thick green tendrils curl down from above, filtering light over paths of sinewy bejuco vine. Trees are everywhere: sprouting through the floor, bending polished concrete surfaces to their will and soaring towards the roof. The air is humid and carries a vegetal musk. It is less like being in
  • Bold Ventures by Charlotte van den Broeck review – architects of their own demise

    Bold Ventures by Charlotte van den Broeck review – architects of their own demise
    A poetic tale of 13 flawed buildings that spelled catastrophe for their designersLate afternoon, Friday 27 January 1922. The sky unzipped and snow began to fall in Washington DC. It came down steadily all night and right through the next day, shrouding the city. Trains were evacuated, cars abandoned in the street. By 8pm on Saturday, 28 inches had fallen. Undaunted, 300 citizens decided to brave the translated streets to see the silent film Get-Rich-Quick Wallingford at Crandall’s Knickerb
  • We have outgrown the Houses of Parliament | Letters

    We have outgrown the Houses of Parliament | Letters
    Westminster’s parliament buildings are archaic and inherently undemocratic argue Dr Louis Hellman, Mick Duncan, Lynne Armstrong and Jim McLeanI must agree with Charlotte Higgins’ article about the unsuitability of the Houses of Parliament (Of course there is abusive behaviour in parliament – the place was built for it, 4 May). It is a fine example of mid-Victorian civic mock-medieval gothic, but quite inappropriate and inhibiting for a modern democracy. We need a new semi-circu
  • Cumbrian council may reverse concrete infilling of Victorian bridge

    Cumbrian council may reverse concrete infilling of Victorian bridge
    Safety work in Great Musgrave decried as ‘cultural vandalism’ may have to be undone despite National Highways saying it was neededThe UK government’s roads agency is facing hundreds of objections a week to its decision to bury a Victorian bridge arch under concrete in a move widely condemned as “cultural vandalism”.National Highways (NH) was forced to apply for retrospective planning permission for a decision last May to pour 1,000 tonnes of concrete and aggregate u
  • Gallery-goers take a twisted trip and history’s visionaries set sail – the week in art

    Gallery-goers take a twisted trip and history’s visionaries set sail – the week in art
    Ceramics smash against abstract art, a trans painter tells her story and crop circles get a late reappraisal – all in your weekly dispatchDreamachine
    A hallucinatory visual experience that promises to subvert your senses. Judging by the health form you have to fill in, it’s pretty intense.
    • At various locations including London, Cardiff, Belfast and Edinburgh from 10 May. Continue reading...
  • Let me introduce you to the plan for London’s latest eyesore – the slab | Simon Jenkins

    Let me introduce you to the plan for London’s latest eyesore – the slab | Simon Jenkins
    For 15 years outsize developments have been making a mess of the Thames – and this South Bank scheme is among the worst
    I could not imagine that London might inflict any more visual damage to the Thames than it has already done. No city on earth has made such a mess of its river. But one of its biggest and most aggressive office blocks has just been approved on the South Bank in the heart of the capital. The slab – or rather tower and slab – that was approved by Lambeth council
  • Kharkiv catalogues war’s toll on its architectural gems

    Kharkiv catalogues war’s toll on its architectural gems
    Destruction of historic buildings is considered a war crime and Kharkiv has been among worst affectedRussia-Ukraine war – latest updatesWithin three weeks of the invasion, Russian forces had hit dozens of historic buildings in Kharkiv, an eastern Ukrainian city recognised at home and abroad for its rich mix of architectural heritage, including grand formal buildings and Soviet modernist structures.Strikes on the city, many of which were carried out by Russian military planes, sent shock wa
  • Of course there is abusive behaviour in parliament – the place was built for it | Charlotte Higgins

    Of course there is abusive behaviour in parliament – the place was built for it | Charlotte Higgins
    A sepulchral maze of dark, asbestos-lined corridors, the palace of Westminster is dangerous and dysfunctionalA few years ago, I spent several months visiting the Palace of Westminster, where 56 MPs are now reportedly accused of sexual misconduct and one has admitted watching porn on his phone. It was eye-opening. I explored its roofscapes and back offices; I stood in the secret domed space above the central lobby; I picked my way through the labyrinth of tunnels below the high-tide level of the
  • ‘I’ve been dug up!’ – the dazzling rebirth of ‘architectural terrorist’ John Outram

    ‘I’ve been dug up!’ – the dazzling rebirth of ‘architectural terrorist’ John Outram
    His cartoon mashup style – full of wit, colour and fun – is suddenly hot, with his stunning buildings even gracing T-shirts and mugs. Our writer enters a world of blitzcrete, shoppertainment and pyramidal glass fireplaces‘Our beginning was a worm,” says John Outram. “It had light-sensitive cells at one end that later turned into eyes.” He is standing in the bathroom at the top of his house in London’s Connaught Square, explaining the symbolism of the pat
  • Britain could learn from the beauty of local power in Belgium | Letters

    Britain could learn from the beauty of local power in Belgium | Letters
    In Belgium, regional authorities are empowered create their own futures, writes Dr Nicholas Falk, while Richard Tippett relates praise of its fine buildingsOliver Wainwright suggests how the public sector could build a much better Britain by adopting the sort of rules used in Flanders to create beautiful buildings (The Flanders phenomenon: how Belgian buildings went from joke to genius, 28 April). However, a much deeper reason why northern Belgium has outpaced the UK in economic as well as envir
  • ‘You get filthy’ – the photographer who shoots sweaty workmen in building sites

    ‘You get filthy’ – the photographer who shoots sweaty workmen in building sites
    Finding it tough to break into conceptual art, David O’Mara shot all the people he worked with in his day job instead – from bricklayers to painters and decoratorsDavid O’Mara is reminiscing about the job that started it all. “A family friend knew someone who had a painting company and they said, ‘Oh, you’ve been to art college, you’ll be all right!’” He laughs. “But I hadn’t touched a paintbrush in years. I was into conceptual ar
  • ‘You get filthy’ – the photographer who shoots manual labourers in building sites

    ‘You get filthy’ – the photographer who shoots manual labourers in building sites
    Finding it tough to break into conceptual art, David O’Mara shot all the people he worked with in his day job instead – from bricklayers to painters and decorators, all very sweatyDavid O’Mara is reminiscing about the job that started it all. “A family friend knew someone who had a painting company and they said, ‘Oh, you’ve been to art college, you’ll be all right!’” He laughs. “But I hadn’t touched a paintbrush in years. I was i
  • Barcelona housing co-op wins prestigious architecture award

    Barcelona housing co-op wins prestigious architecture award
    La Borda, whose model of community living thrived during pandemic. wins prestigious Mies van der Rohe prize A Barcelona housing co-operative that had been in existence less than a year when Spain imposed one of Europe’s toughest lockdowns has won a prestigious architecture award after its model of community living thrived during the pandemic.The wood-framed La Borda scheme of 28 apartments and several shared spaces has won the prestigious Mies van der Rohe prize for emerging architecture f
  • Radical Rooms: Power of the Plan review – the house that Bess built

    Radical Rooms: Power of the Plan review – the house that Bess built
    Riba, London
    A playful exhibition puts three British buildings co-created by women centre stage, complete with dancing floor plansThe collective effort that goes into any building is underplayed, the roles of craftspeople, builders, assistants and clients – co-creators, often women – are overlooked. The fixed and the eternal is favoured over the transient and the mobile, exteriors over interiors, masonry over fabrics. One shouldn’t assign gender roles to building materials, but
  • The Tree of Trees jubilee sculpture is yet another mound of ill-judged public art | Rowan Moore

    The Tree of Trees jubilee sculpture is yet another mound of ill-judged public art | Rowan Moore
    Thomas Heatherwick has been compared to Michelangelo, but this cartoon version of nature is no DavidThe Tree of Trees, an object to be erected outside Buckingham Palace for the Queen’s jubilee, is, according to the studio of its designer, Thomas Heatherwick, a “sculpture” that “seeks to put the importance of trees and nature at the heart of this historic milestone”. Here I’ll pass by the abuse of metaphors (do milestones have hearts?) but not of trees, this be
  • Keith Smith obituary

    Keith Smith obituary
    My friend Keith Smith, who has died aged 84, was an architect whose professional career took him through local authority work, new towns, private practice and teaching at the University of Sheffield.From the mid-1960s he was part of a team of architects, including James Stirling and Michael Wilford, working on the development of Runcorn New Town. Keith was leader of the design team that produced the Esso Motor Hotel, which in 1974 was commended by the RIBA, and later led the team that produced t
  • The Flanders phenomenon: how Belgian buildings went from joke to genius

    The Flanders phenomenon: how Belgian buildings went from joke to genius
    Once derided as ‘the ugliest country in the world’, Belgium now has some of the greatest public architecture on Earth, from sculptural water silos to bombastic port HQs. What happened?In a park on the edge of Antwerp, a low, doughnut-shaped building stands among the trees, looking like a friendly flying saucer nestled in a clearing. On one side, the large windows of a kindergarten open on to a raised terrace where kids play with a view of all the greenery. On the other, a zig-zagging
  • David Lea obituary

    David Lea obituary
    Architect who focused on designing buildings that were in harmony with the natural worldBuilding beautiful places in a way that takes advantage of all that nature provides, while at the same time causing minimal harm to it, is what propelled the architect David Lea, who has died aged 82. His output was not prolific but each project, whether built or unbuilt, demonstrated his determination to create low-impact buildings – at one with the natural world rather than at odds with it.As Lea hims
  • Will this brute of a building herald a new assault on London’s skyline? | Rowan Moore

    Will this brute of a building herald a new assault on London’s skyline? | Rowan Moore
    Developers swoop on areas like the south bank. The onus is on planning officers to reject ugly schemesThere’s a bend in the Thames that gives special prominence to the buildings along it. Here, between Waterloo and Blackfriars Bridges, the south bank of the river bulges outwards, such that anything that stands there takes its place among the north bank’s array of monuments – the Houses of Parliament, Somerset House, St Paul’s Cathedral.If the elaborate British planning sy
  • Art deco gem’s renewal gets NSW country town back in the dance

    Art deco gem’s renewal gets NSW country town back in the dance
    ‘Striking’ theatre revived after years as wool bale warehouse to become one of Australia’s few still being used as originally intendedDownload the free Guardian app; get our morning email briefingAfter a 40-year intermission, the historic Malachi Gilmore hall at Oberon has thrown open its doors with a performance of The Rivoli by Sydney’s Dance Makers Collective. The high-energy touring show – a celebration of mid-century dance halls and their communities – re
  • Ken Taylor obituary

    Ken Taylor obituary
    My friend Ken Taylor, who has died of cancer aged 61, had a passion for culture in its broadest sense and, although he trained and practised as an architect, he contributed equally meaningfully as an artist and curator.The completion of Quay House, a joint development with his wife, Julia Manheim, in 2002, marked them out as a pioneering force in the burgeoning cultural regeneration of Peckham, south London. What was originally a redundant milk depot at 2c King’s Grove was transformed over
  • ‘Spain is ugly’: El País editor takes on his country’s ‘cultural catastrophe’

    ‘Spain is ugly’: El País editor takes on his country’s ‘cultural catastrophe’
    Andrés Rubio charts the growth of towering megahotels and half-built structures in a provocative new bookFor nearly two decades Andrés Rubio poured over photos of Spain’s magnificent cathedrals, delicate Moorish architecture and quaint cobblestone streets. But as the editor of newspaper El País’ travel supplement, what often caught his eye was what was hovering in the background: glimpses of towering megahotels, skeletal remains of half-built buildings or jarring
  • Stalin’s Architect by Deyan Sudjic review – a monumental life

    Stalin’s Architect by Deyan Sudjic review – a monumental life
    His work helped define the grand style of Soviet buildings, but was Boris Iofan a stooge, a propagandist or a victim of circumstance? His story makes for fascinating readingIn March 1976, when doing the rounds of the Barvikha sanatorium outside Moscow, a doctor found the once-celebrated architect Boris Iofan unconscious in his armchair. He was holding a drawing of a statue, Worker and Kolkhoz Woman by Vera Mukhina, that had surmounted Iofan’s most famous built work, the Soviet pavilion at
  • Stalin’s Architect by Deyan Sudjic review – a momumental life

    Stalin’s Architect by Deyan Sudjic review – a momumental life
    His work helped define the grand style of Soviet buildings, but was Boris Iofan a stooge, a propagandist or a victim of circumstance? His story makes for fascinating readingIn March 1976, when doing the rounds of the Barvikha sanatorium outside Moscow, a doctor found the once-celebrated architect Boris Iofan unconscious in his armchair. He was holding a drawing of a statue, Worker and Kolkhoz Woman by Vera Mukhina, that had surmounted Iofan’s most famous built work, the Soviet pavilion at
  • The Guardian view on the future of buildings: make do and mend | Editorial

    The Guardian view on the future of buildings: make do and mend | Editorial
    Demolition and construction are hugely carbon-intensive. Developers must change their waysA controversial decision by London’s mayor, Sadiq Khan, to allow the demolition of a flagship Marks & Spencer store on London’s Oxford Street is one of the highest-profile instances so far of what is certain to become a wider debate about embodied carbon. This crucial term, which refers to the carbon emissions of a building over its lifetime, urgently needs to be brought into wider circulati
  • Nigeria meets Willy Wonka: inside designer Yinka Ilori’s new studio

    Nigeria meets Willy Wonka: inside designer Yinka Ilori’s new studio
    The rule-breaking artist gives us a tour of his joyful spaceThe clashing, freshly painted surfaces of Yinka Ilori’s new studio in west London serve as a colour palette for his design team. “I’ll sometimes find them looking around to find tones to apply to projects,” says the British-Nigerian artist and designer. As you step into the space, there’s a strong powder blue on the wall to your left, a just-paler-than-bubblegum pink on the right, verdant green curtains han
  • Iraq’s ancient buildings are being destroyed by climate change

    Iraq’s ancient buildings are being destroyed by climate change
    Water shortages leading to rising salt concentrations and sandstorms are eroding world’s ancient sitesSome of the world’s most ancient buildings are being destroyed by climate change, as rising concentrations of salt in Iraq eat away at mud brick and more frequent sandstorms erode ancient wonders.Iraq is known as the cradle of civilisation. It was here that agriculture was born, some of the world’s oldest cities were built, like the Sumerian capital Ur, and one of the first wri
  • Rebuilding Nablus: the family bringing life to ancient Palestinian streets

    Rebuilding Nablus: the family bringing life to ancient Palestinian streets
    Time in prison for protesting against Israel’s occupation inspired Basel and Abdalrahman Kittana to revive parts of their neglected and damaged home townPhotographs by Samar Hazboun for the GuardianWith the rich aroma of Arabic coffee and with classical music in the background, Basel Kittana describes what makes the Antique Café in Nablus a place of salvation.A derelict 500-year-old warehouse dating back to the Mameluke era, the cafe has become a place for young Palestinians to hang
  • Rebuilding Nablus: the brothers bringing life to ancient Palestinian streets

    Rebuilding Nablus: the brothers bringing life to ancient Palestinian streets
    Time in prison for protesting against Israel’s occupation inspired Basel and Abdalrahman Kittana revive parts of their neglected and damaged home townPhotographs by Samar Hazboun for the GuardianWith the rich aroma of Arabic coffee and with classical music in the background, Basel Kittana describes what makes the Antique Café in Nablus a place of salvation.A derelict 500-year-old warehouse dating back to the Mameluke era, the cafe has become a place for young Palestinians to hang ou
  • Where tourists seldom tread, part 2: five great UK towns left out of the guidebooks

    Where tourists seldom tread, part 2: five great UK towns left out of the guidebooks
    From Cumbernauld to Guildford, we celebrate more unheralded but revelatory areas
    • Where tourists seldom tread part 1In the 1996 essay Tierra del Fuego – New York, French cultural theorist Jean Baudrillard juxtaposes Ushuaïa with Manhattan. “After the ends of the earth, the centre of the earth,” he writes. “But each gives the impression of being on another planet.” The UK’s forgotten towns have an analogous relationship with its celebrated, over-tour
  • Pride and politics of Sheffield’s Park Hill

    Pride and politics of Sheffield’s Park Hill
    Claims that the estate was neglected by the council are challenged by John Kirkwood, while Chris Bone celebrates a theatrical tribute to the people who have lived thereOliver Wainwright’s otherwise excellent overview of the redevelopment of Sheffield’s Park Hill estate concludes by blaming “the council’s neglect of this public asset” (‘It always felt good here’: how Sheffield’s brutalist Park Hill estate survived the haters and their bulldozers, 7
  • Sacred space or corporate lobby? OMA’s temple pavilion rises in Los Angeles

    Sacred space or corporate lobby? OMA’s temple pavilion rises in Los Angeles
    It’s designed by Rem Koolhaas studio – but the $98m Audrey Irmas Pavilion could have done with a little more divine inspirationWith Romanesque campaniles, gothic spires and brutalist bell towers, Wilshire Boulevard in Los Angeles has long been home to an eclectic parade of religious fantasies. Beginning in the 1920s, when the mid-Wilshire area was an upper-class suburban enclave, congregations competed to construct their outsize monuments along this major east-west thoroughfare. Goth
  • Sandy Bannerman obituary

    Sandy Bannerman obituary
    Architect planner who helped create the new town of Craigavon in Northern Ireland in the 1960sThe Scottish architect planner Sandy Bannerman, who has died aged 94, devoted almost all his long career to the UK’s new towns. His most important role was as chief architect planner to the Craigavon Development Commission, charged with creating a new city in Northern Ireland in the mid-1960s.Great Britain was transformed in the 50s by new housing, schools and even new towns, yet little had change
  • The Coffee Stirrer: New York’s super-thin skyscraper is ready for residents – just don’t mention the swaying

    The Coffee Stirrer: New York’s super-thin skyscraper is ready for residents – just don’t mention the swaying
    The Steinway Tower in Manhattan is so tall and skinny that luxury homes on the upper floors whip around by a few feet whenever the wind gets upName: The Coffee Stirrer.Age: Startlingly new. Continue reading...
  • A once-in-a-lifetime look at Raphael plus Japanese creativity at Buckingham Palace – the week in art

    A once-in-a-lifetime look at Raphael plus Japanese creativity at Buckingham Palace – the week in art
    A Raphael exhibition to convince sceptics, NY minimalist Rosemarie Castoro, spectacular colour from Sheila Hicks and Japanese art with a royal flavour – all in your weekly dispatchRaphael
    This is a once in a lifetime exhibition. It reassembles the legacy of a Renaissance genius who lived fast and died young – from grand frescoes and tapestries to delicate drawings and intimate portraits of lovers. By the end Raphael is laid bare: his personality hovers in the gallery. Even if you don
  • ‘It always felt good here’: how Sheffield’s brutalist Park Hill estate survived the haters and their bulldozers

    ‘It always felt good here’: how Sheffield’s brutalist Park Hill estate survived the haters and their bulldozers
    Branded a no-go area in the 80s, this immense complex was almost flattened like several of its neighbours. But an often painful redevelopment is giving it a new lease of life‘I love Park Hill because you always know when you’re home,” says Joanne Marsden. “When I come back on the train, I look up and think: ‘Wow, I’m here. I’ve made it.’” She’s talking about the colossal housing estate that stands on the hillside above Sheffield like a
  • 12 destinations marking the arrival of modernist Britain

    12 destinations marking the arrival of modernist Britain
    In the centennial year of modernism, we visit visionary places where artists, engineers and architects imagined the futureModernism – which can be loosely defined as a movement that marked a break with the past – radically changed art, literature, performance and the built environment. It got a big break in 1922 with the publication of James Joyce’s Ulysses and TS Eliot’s The Waste Land. Eliot’s mentor, Ezra Pound, called it “year zero” on his calendar &

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