• Decolonizing Rodin: America’s racial reckoning comes to a San Francisco art museum

    Decolonizing Rodin: America’s racial reckoning comes to a San Francisco art museum
    Wangechi Mutu’s I Am Speaking, Are You Listening? juxtaposes the Kenyan American artist’s large-scale, matriarchal works against neoclassical bustsThe racial reckoning that has swept the US for the last year has touched many institutions, high and low. But it’s only now, as the country reopens, that the results are becoming visible.Fine arts museums have grappled with questions of representation and cultural equity, as well as their historical role in imperialism and outright t
  • How rugby star Maro Itoje found his voice: ‘For black people, the road is often trickier’

    How rugby star Maro Itoje found his voice: ‘For black people, the road is often trickier’
    From highlighting black history to tackling everyday racism, the powerful athlete is determined to use his platform for changeJust under a year ago, Maro Itoje popped into his local branch of Waitrose to do some shopping. Despite being one of this country’s finest and most recognisable rugby union players – a 6ft 5in second-row forward who has played in a World Cup final and won virtually every major prize in the club game with his team, Saracens – he still enjoys the luxury of
  • The Best Student and Beginner Oil Paints for Getting to Know the Medium

    The Best Student and Beginner Oil Paints for Getting to Know the Medium
    If you purchase an independently reviewed product or service through a link on our website, we may receive an affiliate commission.
    Oil painting can be an expensive hobby. Due to the complex, arduous processes of sourcing, grinding, and treating pigments, some paints can reach shelves with hair-raising price tags. Thankfully, you can be kind to your wallet without sacrificing too much in terms of quality. There are plenty of student-grade and hobbyist oil paints on the market that are well worth
  • Christie’s to Auction $17 M. Bellotto Landscape Poised to Break Record

    Christie’s to Auction $17 M. Bellotto Landscape Poised to Break Record
    As the market for Old Master paintings continues to prove fertile, Christie’s will auction a potentially record-breaking landscape by Italian artist Bernardo Bellotto during it’s July 8 evening sale in London dedicated to the category. The 18th-century painting, View of Verona with the Ponte delle Navi (ca. 1745-47) depicts a view of a canal in the Italian city. Coming to auction after 50 years in private hands and secured with a guarantee, it is expected to fetch a price of £1
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  • With a Focus on Artist Collectives, Tate Names Turner Prize Shortlist

    With a Focus on Artist Collectives, Tate Names Turner Prize Shortlist
    Tate Britain has announced another update to its esteemed Turner Prize, which has undergone changes over the past two years and is considered the most prestigious art award in the United Kingdom.
    Typically, the museum shortlists four individual artists. This year, it has instead shortlisted five artist collectives: Array Collective, Black Obsidian Sound System, Cooking Sections, Gentle/Radical, and Project Art Works.
    As part of the Turner Prize, each nominated collective will present work in a j
  • Rarely Seen Catherine de’ Medici Portrait to Go On View in London

    Rarely Seen Catherine de’ Medici Portrait to Go On View in London
    The last surviving contemporary portrait of Catherine de’ Medici, queen consort and wife of king Henry II of France, will return to its former home in London. According to a report by the Guardian, the rarely seen painting, which dates to 1561 and shows Catherine with four of her children, will go on view at Strawberry Hill House in the British capital, where it once hung with other works in the storied collection of the 18th-century writer and politician Horace Walpole.
    The portrait, whic
  • After a Year of Isolation, Frieze New York Strikes Notes of Normalcy as Uncertainty Remains

    After a Year of Isolation, Frieze New York Strikes Notes of Normalcy as Uncertainty Remains
    The experience of going to an art fair after a year of few in-person experiences of any kind turns out to be extremely strange before it turns slightly less strange and then not strange at all over the course of just three hours. The scene at the entrance of Frieze New York on Wednesday was a bit scattered and manic, as fairgoers fumbled to show proof of vaccination or negative coronavirus tests with more than a little anxiety in the air.
    Once you got inside, though, with some time to calibrate,
  • Street Art in the Age of Basquiat: Rammellzee is Not a Name, But an Equation

    Street Art in the Age of Basquiat: Rammellzee is Not a Name, But an Equation
    The following is part four of a series of interviews with key figures in Jean-Michel Basquiat’s downtown New York circle in the 1980s. The interviews were conducted in February by Museum of Fine Arts Boston curator Liz Munsell and writer and musician Greg Tate, who together curated the exhibition “Writing the Future: Basquiat and the Hip-Hop Generation,” on view at the MFA through July 25. ARTnews has published all four interviews from the series this week.
    In 19
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  • AnR Loves: Pilot’s Varsity Disposable Fountain Pen

    AnR Loves: Pilot’s Varsity Disposable Fountain Pen
    If you purchase an independently reviewed product or service through a link on our website, we may receive an affiliate commission.
    To paraphrase Obi-Wan Kenobi describing the lightsaber to Luke Skywalker in Star Wars, the fountain pen is an elegant writing implement for a more civilized age. Ballpoints, felt tips, and gel pens all have their uses, but none of them can match the fountain pen’s expressive line and analog warmth.
    The first pen with an internal reservoir for ink is thought to
  • Antwaun Sargent’s Vision for the New Talent Issue

    Antwaun Sargent’s Vision for the New Talent Issue
    In a new video interview about the New Talent issue, Antwaun Sargent reflects that even “as things have grown more diverse, as our idea of the artist has expanded, our notions of who gets to write about art have not.” Sargent took the opportunity as guest editor to cultivate rigorous yet accessible writing about art. As he details in his editor’s letter, many types of art criticism already exist “in comments sections of social media posts, DMs, group chats”—no
  • Spirits Welcome: Beverly Buchanan at Andrew Edlin

    Spirits Welcome: Beverly Buchanan at Andrew Edlin
    During the six years since Beverly Buchanan’s first solo show at Andrew Edlin (she died in 2015, just after her debut there), the artist’s work has been folded into broader discourses about outsider art and resistance politics, largely thanks to her showing at the Brooklyn Museum and the Studio Museum in Harlem. Her second solo exhibition at the gallery, “Shacks and Legends, 1985–2011,” offers an opportunity to revisit her renderings of houses—inspired by thos
  • Gold for the Gods: Rare 1,500-Year-Old Pendants Found in Norse Ritual Hoard

    Gold for the Gods: Rare 1,500-Year-Old Pendants Found in Norse Ritual Hoard
    Beneath clay soil in a field in southeastern Norway, archaeologists have uncovered seven gold pendants known as bracteates, Science Norway reports. It is the only such find in the last 70 years, and is an “incredibly rare” votive hoard, according to the three archaeologists heading the project: Jessica Leigh McGraw, Margrete Figenschou Simonsen, and Magne Samdal, all from the University of Oslo Museum of Cultural History.
    Only the wealthiest and highest-status individuals would be ab
  • Karl Wirsum, Hairy Who Artist with Eccentric Style, Has Died at 81

    Karl Wirsum, Hairy Who Artist with Eccentric Style, Has Died at 81
    Karl Wirsum, a member of Chicago’s Hairy Who group of the 1960s whose art envisioned a madcap universe unto itself, has died at 81. Dealer Derek Eller, whose New York gallery represents Wirsum alongside Chicago’s Corbett vs. Dempsey, said that he died of cardiac arrest.
    “It has been an enormous privilege to work with such a talented, important, and influential artist,” the gallery wrote in a statement posted to Instagram.
    Wirsum was part of a crop of Chicago artists that
  • The Epic Banal

    The Epic Banal
    Amy Sherald: A Midsummer Afternoon Dream, 2020, oil on canvas, 106 by 101 inches.
    Tyler Mitchell and Amy Sherald—two Atlanta-born, New York–based artists—both capture everyday joy in their images of Black Americans. Recurring motifs in Mitchell’s photographs, installations, and videos include outdoor space and fashionable friends. Sherald, a painter, shares similar motifs: her colorful paintings with pastel palettes show Black people enjoying American moments, their skin
  • Mikael B’s Latest Exhibition in Los Angeles Presents Genre-Bending Works

    Mikael B’s Latest Exhibition in Los Angeles Presents Genre-Bending Works
    Los Angeles is home to a wide variety of art, welcoming the conventional and the unconventional alike. A city whose culture seeks out the new and exciting in every field, L.A. is the perfect place for Danish urban contemporary artist Mikael B’s newest solo exhibition, “Flow State.” This genre-bending collection of works, on display at Maddox Gallery, simultaneously explores, juxtaposes, and reconciles the three worlds of abstract expressionism, geometric abstraction, and surrea
  • Interpol Releases Art-Theft App, Frank Gehry’s Philadelphia Museum of Art Renovation is Done, and More: Morning Links from May 7, 2021

    Interpol Releases Art-Theft App, Frank Gehry’s Philadelphia Museum of Art Renovation is Done, and More: Morning Links from May 7, 2021
    To receive Morning Links in your inbox every weekday, sign up for our Breakfast with ARTnews newsletter.
    The Headlines
    INTERPOL, THE INTERNATIONAL CRIMINAL POLICE ORGANIZATION, has gone into the app business. The group’s new ID-Art app lets users upload photographs of artworks, which are then checked against its database of stolen pieces via image-recognition technology, Forbes reports. (Sounds like a fun way to kill som
  • Psychedelic spring colours and some spectacular surf – the week in art

    Psychedelic spring colours and some spectacular surf – the week in art
    Jim Lambie’s pulsing palette returns, Carol Rhodes shakes up the landscape and the late great Takis unleashes some cosmic vibrations – all in your weekly dispatchJim Lambie
    Pulsing psychedelic colours for spring, bursting with buttercup yellow, in this uplifting artist’s latest installation.
    • Modern Institute, Glasgow, until 22 May. Continue reading...
  • Five art collectives shortlisted for Turner prize

    Five art collectives shortlisted for Turner prize
    As few artists have been able to show publicly, judges focus on continuing collaborative workFive art collectives will this year battle it out for the Turner prize, the first time no individual artist has been shortlisted for what remains one of the world’s best-known awards for visual art.The choice of collectives reflects the fact that few artists have been able to publicly show anything over the past year. It prompted judges to focus on groups of artists whose collaborative work has dem
  • Catherine de’ Medici 1561 portrait to return to London mansion

    Catherine de’ Medici 1561 portrait to return to London mansion
    Painting has been acquired for nation and will be reinstalled at Strawberry Hill House in TwickenhamA monumental portrait of Catherine de’ Medici, one of the most powerful women in 16th-century Europe, will return to Strawberry Hill House in Twickenham after it was acquired for the nation in lieu of tax.The picture was originally installed in the gothic revival mansion built by Horace Walpole, who acquired it 247 years ago, and was part of an important collection amassed by the son of Sir
  • The Great British Art Tour: the tears of a clown

    The Great British Art Tour: the tears of a clown
    With most public art collections still closed we are bringing the art to you, exploring highlights from across the country in partnership with Art UK. Today’s pick: Ethel Wright’s Bonjour, Pierrot! in OldhamIt was during her time studying at Académie Julian, in Paris, that Ethel Wright became familiar with Pierrot. Pierrot, the lovelorn peasant, had first appeared in French literature in Molière’s 1665 comedy Dom Juan or the Feast of the Stone, since when he has app
  • Finish Your Pots with the Best Wood Rib Tools for Ceramics

    Finish Your Pots with the Best Wood Rib Tools for Ceramics
    Rib tools are essential in the shaping of ceramic pieces, especially when you’re throwing them on a wheel. While silicone and rubber versions of these tools are often used for finishing a piece and ridding it of imperfections, potters rely on the ones made of wood for most of the initial shaping. Because wooden tools are quite hard and unforgiving, leaving little room for error, it’s important to choose implements with just the right shape and feel for you. Below, we review the best
  • With His Collection of Americana, Alan Page Makes the Past Visible

    With His Collection of Americana, Alan Page Makes the Past Visible
    In 1981, after 15 years playing with the Minnesota Vikings, Alan Page decided to become a lawyer. This was a rare move for a football player who had achieved mass success, but after finally coming to terms with a years-long inner conflict over sport and law, as Page recently told ARTnews, “it was time for me to move on.” Since then, he has risen to the highest levels of the legal world. In 1993, he was appointed as a justice of the Minnesota Supreme Court, the first Black person to o
  • Citing Surge in Covid Cases, Istanbul Biennial Postpones 2021 Edition

    Citing Surge in Covid Cases, Istanbul Biennial Postpones 2021 Edition
    Citing the “gravity of the ongoing health crisis,” the Istanbul Biennial in Turkey has postponed its 17th edition. Previously planned to open this September, the exhibition will now be held from September 17 to November 20, 2022. The decision was made by the event’s organizer, the Istanbul Foundation for Culture and Arts (ISKV), in agreement with the curators—Ute Meta Bauer, Amar Kanwar, and David Teh—and participants.
    “The 17th Istanbul Biennial, its curators
  • How Felix Gonzalez-Torres’s Unabashedly Political Art Lent Minimalism a New Context

    How Felix Gonzalez-Torres’s Unabashedly Political Art Lent Minimalism a New Context
    Like many of his other works, Felix Gonzalez-Torres’s light bulb sculptures can be presented in countless different ways. They’ve been shown in spaces one might expect—the steely, cold white cubes of museums and galleries around the world—but they’ve also been shown in unexpected places. They have been slung over paper-strewn bulletin boards and desks, as they were in the offices of Helsinki’s Museum of Contemporary Art in 1995; suspended from ceilings more th
  • See Images of Felix Gonzalez-Torres’s Poignant Works About Loss and Memory

    See Images of Felix Gonzalez-Torres’s Poignant Works About Loss and Memory
    With his pared-down, melancholy works, Felix Gonzalez-Torres found an evocative language for dealing with loss during the ’80s and ’90s amid the AIDS crisis. In sculptures, installations, photographs, and more, Gonzalez-Torres mined the look of Minimalism to explore how meaning is made and what it means for a person to truly disappear.
    With a survey of his work currently on view at the Museum of Contemporary Art of Barcelona in Spain, below is a look at some of the most famous works
  • Making It: Get Started Dyeing

    Making It: Get Started Dyeing
    Amber Joy Greenidge-Sabral was dyeing fabrics outdoors one summer when she realized how much her synthetic colorants had transformed the yard. “By the end of the day, the grass had turned black,” she said. While scouring the internet for alternative dye methods, she came across Wild Colours, a natural dye studio in Birmingham, England, founded by textile artist Teresinha Roberts. Greenidge-Sabral, an artist living in London, got in touch with Roberts and quickly found herself drawn t
  • Street Art in the Age of Basquiat: Jenny Holzer and Lady Pink on Streetwise Feminisms, Satanism, and Reaganomics

    Street Art in the Age of Basquiat: Jenny Holzer and Lady Pink on Streetwise Feminisms, Satanism, and Reaganomics
    The following is part of a series of interviews with key figures in Jean-Michel Basquiat’s downtown New York circle in the 1980s. The interviews were conducted in February by Museum of Fine Arts Boston curator Liz Munsell and writer and musician Greg Tate, who together curated the exhibition “Writing the Future: Basquiat and the Hip-Hop Generation,” on view at the MFA through July 25. ARTnews will publish four interviews from the series each day this week.
    In Downtown New York
  • Private Archives: Jorian Charlton at Gallery TPW

    Private Archives: Jorian Charlton at Gallery TPW
    In 2017, Jamaican-Canadian photographer Jorian Charlton’s father gave her a bag full of slides, “for safekeeping.” The handover was so casual that Charlton didn’t look into the bag for several years. What she eventually found was a treasure trove of candid portraits and documentary photographs that her father, an engineer, had taken during the 1970s and ’80s, along the route that brought him from Jamaica to Toronto, by way of Atlanta and New Jersey. Charlton’s
  • Portrait of happiness: long lockdown ends for the artist Philip Sutton

    Portrait of happiness: long lockdown ends for the artist Philip Sutton
    A ‘terrible year’ of Covid lockdown that confined him to a care home for 421 days ends in a garden party for celebrated painterCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageClutching a quill and pots of ink, Philip Sutton ended his 421-day care home lockdown this week by heading out to do what has been impossible since the Covid pandemic began: observe something new and capture it on paper.The 92-year-old Royal Academician, who built a reputation as one of Britain
  • Rare North Korean Art Alights in Switzerland, Oldest Human Burial in Africa Discovered, and More: Morning Links from May 6, 2021

    Rare North Korean Art Alights in Switzerland, Oldest Human Burial in Africa Discovered, and More: Morning Links from May 6, 2021
    To receive Morning Links in your inbox every weekday, sign up for our Breakfast with ARTnews newsletter.
    The Headlines
    RESEARCHERS HAVE DISCOVERED THE OLDEST known human burial in Africa, National Geographic reports. Uncovered in Kenya, the roughly 80,000-year-old site is the resting place of a child of 2 or 3. Archaeologists believe the child was buried in a shroud, with a pillow under their head. Older human burials have been discovered elsewhere, l
  • Rare Roman-Era ‘Face-Shaped’ Bronze Oil Lamp Found in Jerusalem

    Rare Roman-Era ‘Face-Shaped’ Bronze Oil Lamp Found in Jerusalem
    Archaeologists have discovered a rare bronze oil lamp in the shape of a half-face, dating to the Roman Period between 70 and 135 C.E., during excavations in the City of David National Park in Jerusalem. The lamp was uncovered in the foundations of a building along the pilgrimage road. “The offering of this lamp may attest to the importance of the building,” Israel Antiquities Authority archaeologists Ari Levy and Dr. Yuval Baruch told Jewish Press, “which may have been linked t
  • Freaky fairytales: the upside-down mind of Rachel Maclean – in pictures

    Freaky fairytales: the upside-down mind of Rachel Maclean – in pictures
    She’s starred in DayGlo works as a post-truth populist and an army of germs. Now the inventive Scot is celebrating her first public artwork – an abandoned shop at Jupiter Artland where normal rules don’t apply Continue reading...
  • The Best Permanent Markers for Detailing, Coloring, and More

    The Best Permanent Markers for Detailing, Coloring, and More
    A well-stocked studio should always include some permanent markers. These versatile tools, great for both functional purposes (like labeling) and artistic pursuits, are easy to work with and inexpensive, especially when purchased in sets. They come in many nib sizes, which makes them a great tool for detailed artworks. Whether you’re filling in a coloring book, drafting on acetate, or working on a design project for a client, choose the best products to express yourself. Read on to learn a
  • Brush, Pour, Drip, and Airbrush with the Best Fluid Acrylic Paints

    Brush, Pour, Drip, and Airbrush with the Best Fluid Acrylic Paints
    If you purchase an independently reviewed product or service through a link on our website, we may receive an affiliate commission.
    Fluid acrylics are versatile paints to keep in the studio. Less viscous than standard acrylics, they can be used with a brush for beautiful glazing effects but can also be poured, dripped, and airbrushed. The very best of these use no fillers or extenders in their formulas and offer strong tinting and excellent coverage without sacrificing color. With many high-qual
  • Collector Lonti Ebers to Open Brooklyn Space with Focus on Experimental Art in June

    Collector Lonti Ebers to Open Brooklyn Space with Focus on Experimental Art in June
    With an eye toward supporting boundary-pushing artists with research-based practices, collector and arts patron Lonti Ebers will launch a new exhibition space and residency program in Brooklyn next month. Initially expected to be inaugurated in 2019, Amant will now open on June 5 with a survey of Berlin-based artist Grada Kilomba, who has never before had a solo show in New York.
    In addition to revealing its opening date, Amant has announced that its artistic director will be Ruth Estévez
  • The Best Watercolor Pencils for Painterly Effects

    The Best Watercolor Pencils for Painterly Effects
    If you purchase an independently reviewed product or service through a link on our website, we may receive an affiliate commission
    They look just like colored pencils, but watercolor pencils are far more versatile. With cores made with a water-soluble binder, these implements can be used dry or with water for a wide range of effects. Artists can dip the tip of a watercolor pencil into water for a velvety, thick line; they can wet their paper and then draw on it; or they can draw dry, opaque line
  • How I Made This: Sarah Oppenheimer’s Interactive Machines of Perception

    How I Made This: Sarah Oppenheimer’s Interactive Machines of Perception
    Sarah Oppenheimer, an American artist based in New York City, is drawn to the way the human body interacts with objects to change the way space is perceived: “Think about a doorknob,” she said during a recent Zoom call. “When a doorknob begins to turn, you understand that the door will open, someone will enter the room, and the space you are already inhabiting will be completely reconfigured.” 
    A senior critic at the Yale School of Art, Oppenheimer has held recent so
  • Auction House Veterans Unveil New Data and Private Dealing Platform

    Auction House Veterans Unveil New Data and Private Dealing Platform
    There’s a funny thing that happens in the private art market that really isn’t very funny when it happens to you. Because the best art is rarely for sale publicly—and because art buying is too much like being on a treasure hunt—it isn’t uncommon for someone to approach a collector known to have work by an in-demand artist and claim to have a serious buyer for it. After some blandishments and extravagant promises, the ‘runner,’ as a person in that positio
  • Street Art in the Age of Basquiat: Fab 5 Freddy and Lee Quiñones on Curating the MTA for World Domination

    Street Art in the Age of Basquiat: Fab 5 Freddy and Lee Quiñones on Curating the MTA for World Domination
    The following is the second part in a series of interviews with key figures in Jean-Michel Basquiat’s downtown New York circle in the 1980s. (Click here for Part One of this interview.) The interviews were conducted in February by Museum of Fine Arts Boston curator Liz Munsell and writer and musician Greg Tate, who together curated the exhibition “Writing the Future: Basquiat and the Hip-Hop Generation,” on view at the MFA through July 25, 2021.
    Fab 5 Freddy’s Campbell&rs
  • The NFT’s Promise of Control

    The NFT’s Promise of Control
    Artists are always looking for ways to make financial and legal systems that usually favor collectors and dealers work better for them. This attitude has led some to experiment with non-fungible tokens (NFTs). The technology is a digital “smart contract” encoded on a blockchain, which stipulates the ownership and resale rights for a specific digital artwork that is typically linked in the contract but hosted elsewhere. Artists see potential to ensure royalties for themselves when an
  • Silhouettes and Illuminations: Ray Johnson at David Zwirner

    Silhouettes and Illuminations: Ray Johnson at David Zwirner
    How do you draw a Ray Johnson? The artist’s contours can be difficult to trace. Johnson had been living in seclusion on Long Island for nearly thirty years, appearing mostly through the art he sent friends and strangers in the mail, before he jumped off a Sag Harbor bridge in January 1995. Yet he was also a queer gadabout whose extensive network—established in person and maintained by post—led his friends in the three-artist collective General Idea to affectionately dub him &ld
  • Sean-Kierre Lyons’s Flower Warriors and Cracker Flags

    Sean-Kierre Lyons’s Flower Warriors and Cracker Flags
    Drop in Water, 2017, crackers, acrylic, and resin.
    If, in the winter of 2017, you had walked along Gates Avenue—which stretches from Clinton Hill, Brooklyn, to Fresh Pond, Queens—you would have found its midpoint conspicuously marked by a version of the Confederate flag. The migratory art gallery Housing, then located in Bedford-Stuyvesant, had recently installed Sean-Kierre Lyons’s Drop in Water (2017) in its storefront window. Like most of Lyons’s works, the flag was a
  • How the Filipino Brand Aranaz Designed Its Iconic Crab Handbag

    How the Filipino Brand Aranaz Designed Its Iconic Crab Handbag
    The family-owned accessories label Aranaz got so many requests for its crab bag, a wicker handbag in the shape of the crustacean, after it sold out, that the brand decided to reissue it. This was unusual, because Aranaz usually doesn’t bring back bags from its seasonal collections. Even more unusual was that these requests were coming during the pandemic, when the Filipino women asking for the wicker crab minaudieres — the term for a small substitute for an evening bag — didn&r
  • Daniel Libeskind Will Redesign Pittsburgh’s Tree of Life Synagogue, Art Enters Chernobyl, and More: Morning Links from May 5, 2021

    Daniel Libeskind Will Redesign Pittsburgh’s Tree of Life Synagogue, Art Enters Chernobyl, and More: Morning Links from May 5, 2021
    To receive Morning Links in your inbox every weekday, sign up for our Breakfast with ARTnews newsletter.
    The Headlines
    ARCHITECT DANIEL LIBESKIND HAS BEEN SELECTED to redesign the campus of the Tree of Life synagogue in Pittsburgh, where 11 were killed by a gunman in 2018, the New York Times reports. Libeskind, whose projects have included the Jewish Museum in Berlin and the Denver Art Museum, was selected unanimously by
  • Clearing the dancefloor: how club culture became a museum piece

    Clearing the dancefloor: how club culture became a museum piece
    In the pandemic, nightclubs have been turned into exhibition spaces, switching the craze for museums evoking clubs. It’s throwing fresh perspective on what dancing is even forThe ttttssshhhhhh of a smoke machine breaks the silence as a red spotlight blinks to life, illuminating social distancing markers on a dancefloor polished smooth by the shuffling of feet. The soundsystem kicks into gear with an anthem by techno star Dave Clarke. But the DJ booth is empty, and the only ravers here are
  • ‘We go after them like pitbulls’ – the art detective who hunts stolen Picassos and lost Matisses

    ‘We go after them like pitbulls’ – the art detective who hunts stolen Picassos and lost Matisses
    Christopher Marinello has spent three decades finding missing masterpieces, recovering half a billion dollars’ worth of art. He talks about threats from mobsters, tricky negotiations – and bungling thievesOne summer morning in 2008, Christopher Marinello was waiting on 72nd Street in Manhattan, New York. The traffic was busy, but after a few minutes he saw what he was waiting for: a gold Mercedes with blacked-out windows drew near. As it pulled up to the kerb, a man in the passenger
  • Cities of dreams: a Dutch master reimagines the metropolis – in pictures

    Cities of dreams: a Dutch master reimagines the metropolis – in pictures
    Frank van der Salm has spent 25 years turning the way we see urban surfaces upside down – from twinkling nightscapes to eerie, empty interiors Continue reading...
  • The Great British Art Tour: the ugly duchess, warts and all

    The Great British Art Tour: the ugly duchess, warts and all
    With public art collections closed we are bringing the art to you, exploring highlights from across the country in partnership with Art UK. Today’s pick: Massys’s An Old Woman in the National Gallery, LondonThis is one of the most arresting faces in the National Gallery’s collection. A protruding forehead, eyes set deep in their sockets, a pushed-up nose, wide nostrils, a hairy mole, a toothless mouth, a rumpled neck: the unmistakable features of the old woman known as “t
  • With an Eye Toward Racial Justice, Frieze New York Plans ‘Unprecedented’ Edition

    With an Eye Toward Racial Justice, Frieze New York Plans ‘Unprecedented’ Edition
    What is the role of an art fair in discussions about racial justice? That question will be explored this week at Frieze New York, the first major fair to take place in person in the United States since the March 2020 lockdown.
    For this edition, which runs May 5–9 at the Shed, Frieze New York will pay tribute to the Vision & Justice Project, an expansive educational initiative led by Harvard University professor Sarah Lewis that examines ways that art—in particular photography&mda
  • Julião Sarmento, Artist Whose Intimate Work Focused on Desire, Has Died at 72

    Julião Sarmento, Artist Whose Intimate Work Focused on Desire, Has Died at 72
    Portuguese artist Julião Sarmento, whose films, sculptures, installations, and paintings consider the complexity of desire and intimacy, has died at 72. New York’s Sean Kelly gallery, which had worked with Sarmento since 1989, confirmed the news.
    In a statement to ARTnews, the gallery wrote, “Julião was with the gallery since its inception. He was inspirational, loyal, and much loved by all who knew him. Over the decades we shared many wonderful memories, exhibitions, a

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