• Wise words? The advice that I can't forget

    Wise words? The advice that I can't forget
    From my nan telling me not to lick my finger when turning a page to dubious showering guidance, why do some things stick in our brain?It’s funny, the things that stick in your mind for ever. When I was little, my brother and I would usually go to our grandparents’ house after school. We would be given our tea in front of the telly, which we would sit and watch while Grandad read the Express and Star and Nan read a magazine. I noticed that every time she turned a page, she licked her
  • Who's Playing "Hard-To-Get," and Who's Attracted by It?

    Source: Science Daily - Top NewsPlaying "hard-to-get" is an age-old gambit for dating and mating, familiar to moviegoers and readers of literature. New research published in the journal Personality and Individual Differences looks at the psychological underpinnings of making yourself seem desirable by withholding obvious signs of romantic interest.
  • Sioux Leader Says Trump Should Stay Away from Mount Rushmore

    Sioux Leader Says Trump Should Stay Away from Mount Rushmore
    Source: Yahoo News - Top HeadlinesDonald Trump should not carry out his planned July 3rd visit to Mount Rushmore in South Dakota because it represents a safety risk in the middle of the coronavirus pandemic and is an insult to Native Americans on whose stolen land it was built, the president of the Oglala Sioux tribal council has said.
  • Pandemic Offers Opportunity for Greater Race and Gender Equity

    Pandemic Offers Opportunity for Greater Race and Gender Equity
    Source: Yahoo News - BusinessA new survey of business leaders and general employees has found that many workers view disruptions caused by the pandemic as an opportunity for companies to improve race and gender equity. For example, the survey found that 8 in 10 business leaders thought the changes sparked by the COVID-19 outbreak provide a chance to make the workplace more inclusive for people of color.
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  • Risk for Depression Doubled in Kids Born to Mothers with It

    Risk for Depression Doubled in Kids Born to Mothers with It
    Source: United Press International - Health NewsChildren born to mothers who had depression during or after pregnancy are nearly twice as likely as others to develop the disorder later in life, an analysis published Tuesday by JAMA Network Open found. In general, the risk was slightly higher for children of mothers with perinatal depression than those whose mothers had the postpartum form of the condition, the researchers said.
  • Facing Racial Discrimination Linked to Hypertension in Black Americans

    Facing Racial Discrimination Linked to Hypertension in Black Americans
    Source: United Press International - Health NewsFacing racial discrimination is associated with higher risk of high blood pressure among Black Americans, according to a study published Wednesday by the journal Hypertension. Black people who reported "medium levels" of lifetime discrimination had a 49 percent increased risk for high blood pressure, or hypertension, compared to those who reported low levels of lifetime discrimination, the researchers found.
  • Infant Sleep Issues Linked to Mental Health Problems in Adolescents

    Source: CNN - HealthSleep problems in early childhood may be linked to the development of certain mental health disorders in adolescence, according to new research. A study of 7,155 children found that waking up frequently and irregular sleep routines as babies and toddlers was linked to psychotic experiences in children ages 12 and 13. The research, published in JAMA Psychiatry, was the first to link early childhood sleep problems with adolescent psychotic...
  • Many Asian and Black in U.S. Report Facing More Bias During Pandemic

    Source: CNN - Top StoriesAbout 40% of Asian and Black Americans say people have acted uncomfortable around them because of their race or ethnicity since the coronavirus pandemic began, according to a new report from the Pew Research Center. And nearly a third of Asian Americans say they've been subject to racist slurs or jokes, the study found, while 26% say they've feared someone might physically attack them.
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  • GOP Senators Propose Scrapping Columbus Day, Adding Juneteenth

    GOP Senators Propose Scrapping Columbus Day, Adding Juneteenth
    Source: Yahoo News - BusinessRepublican senators Ron Johnson and James Lankford introduced an amendment Wednesday that would replace Columbus Day with Juneteenth as a federal holiday. The proposal, which follows last week's introduction of a bipartisan Senate bill by Republican Senator John Cornyn that would establish Juneteenth as a federal holiday, is aimed in large part at offsetting the cost associated with Cornyn's plan.
  • Trump Administration Plans to End Another Transgender Protection

    Source: CNN - Top StoriesThe Department of Housing and Urban Development announced Wednesday that it plans to roll back an Obama-era rule that barred federally funded homeless shelters from discriminating against transgender people.
  • "They Want to Kill Me": Many COVID Patients Have Terrifying Delirium

    "They Want to Kill Me": Many COVID Patients Have Terrifying Delirium
    Source: Yahoo News - Top HeadlinesKim Victory was paralyzed on a bed and being burned alive. Later, she was turned into an ice sculpture, and then attacked by cats. Nightmarish visions like these, called hospital delirium, have traditionally been seen mostly in a subset of older patients, but recent reports from hospitals and researchers suggest that about two-thirds to three-fourths of coronavirus patients in intensive care units have experienced it in various ways.
  • Why Gay-Friendly Taiwan Is a Creative Haven for LGBTQ Art

    Source: CNN - Top StoriesAround this time last year, Taiwan was gearing up to host Asia's largest ever Pride parade, having just become the first place on the continent to legalize same-sex marriage. More than 4,000 gay couples have since taken advantage of the landmark legislation. But beyond being able to tie the knot, the island's LGBTQ communities are feeling the positive effects of the law in other ways.
  • New York Cuts Police Budget Amid "Defund" Call

    New York Cuts Police Budget Amid "Defund" Call
    Source: Yahoo News - BusinessNew York City lawmakers have approved a plan that would slash $1 billion from the police department's annual budget as calls by anti-racism protesters to defund law enforcement sweep the United States. The cuts include scrapping the planned hiring of about 1,160 new police officers, as well as reducing overtime costs. President Donald Trump lashed out at the cuts and the city's plan to paint a Black Lives Matter sign outside Trump Tower on Fifth...
  • Los Angeles Slashes Police Budget After Protest Demands

    Los Angeles Slashes Police Budget After Protest Demands
    Source: Yahoo News - BusinessLos Angeles voted Wednesday to cut the city's police budget by $150 million, acceding in part to demands made during last month's anti-racism protests sparked by the death of George Floyd. The measure was passed in a 12-2 vote by the city council, with much of the money to be redirected to minority areas of Los Angeles.
  • The Worst Boss Ever!

    The Worst Boss Ever!
    By Yashi Srivastava - Have you ever worked with a really mean boss? One who is quick to notice your mistakes and is blind to your accomplishments? One who counts the number of hours you spent in office but forgets that you also worked on the weekend? One who seems to have made it his or her mission to make your life miserable?
    Considering quite a few employees leave their organizations because of a bad manager, I am guessing many of you can relate to the frustrations of having a boss like this.
  • New Analysis of fMRI Data May Hone Schizophrenia Treatment

    New Analysis of fMRI Data May Hone Schizophrenia Treatment
    In a new study, researchers from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) have developed tools to improve the analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data, and as a result are now able to identify subgroups of schizophrenia patients.
    The new findings can assist in diagnosis and treatment of patients with mental illnesses that can be difficult to identify and show medical practitioners whether the current treatments have or have not been working based on image grouping
  • Gender Bias Kept Alive by People Who Think It’s Dead

    Gender Bias Kept Alive by People Who Think It’s Dead
    Workplace gender bias is being kept alive by people who think it’s no longer an issue, according to new research.
    In a new study, managers were given identical descriptions of a worker — the only difference being either a male or female name.
    Most managers rated the male worker as more competent and recommended a higher salary — an average 8% pay gap, according to the study’s findings.
    The key drivers of this gap were managers who thought bias no longer existed in their p
  • Unexpected Mental Illnesses Found in Spectrum of Rare Disorder

    Unexpected Mental Illnesses Found in Spectrum of Rare Disorder
    In a new study, University of California (UC) Davis MIND Institute researchers found an unexpected set of mental illnesses in patients with a spectrum of fragile X syndrome, a rare single-gene disorder that is the leading inherited cause of intellectual disability.
    The patients in the study had a “double-hit” condition that combined features and symptoms of fragile X syndrome and premutation disorder, a condition associated with the development of neurological problems typically asso
  • Teen Use of Social Media for Social Support – Tips to Optimize Benefits

    Teen Use of Social Media for Social Support – Tips to Optimize Benefits
    For parents, it goes without saying that youth are using social media to connect and support each other. The embrace of social media has been extraordinary among adolescents well before COVID-19 precautions. With the current need to social distance, a new paper explores how teens support each other through digital media during times of stress and isolation.
    In the integrative review paper, “Youth Connections for Wellbeing,” scholars Mimi Ito, Candice Odgers and Stephen Schueller &mda
  • Donald Trump Accuses Democrats of "Incredible Stupidity" Over John Wayne

    Donald Trump Accuses Democrats of "Incredible Stupidity" Over John Wayne
    Source: The Independent - World News Donald Trump is accusing some Democratic officials of "incredible stupidity" in calling for actor John Wayne's name to be removed from an airport in California after an interview resurfaced of Wayne embracing white supremacy. "I believe in white supremacy until the blacks are educated to a point of responsibility," the late actor said in a 1971 interview.
  • After Some States Rush to Reopen, U.S. Sees Spike in COVID-19 Cases

    After Some States Rush to Reopen, U.S. Sees Spike in COVID-19 Cases
    Source: Yahoo News - Top HeadlinesMore than four months into fighting the coronavirus in the United States, the shared sacrifice of millions of Americans suspending their lives—with jobs lost, businesses shuttered, daily routines upended—has not been enough to beat back the virus. The number of new U.S. cases this last week surged dangerously high, to levels not ever seen in the course of the pandemic, especially in states that had rushed to reopen their economies.
  • Mississippi Flag Becomes Last to Remove Confederate Emblem

    Mississippi Flag Becomes Last to Remove Confederate Emblem
    Source: Yahoo News - Top HeadlinesThe Mississippi state legislature voted on Sunday to remove the emblem of the Confederacy from the state flag. State residents had previously been resistant to changing the flag; however, polling from the state's Chamber of Commerce indicated that 55 percent of residents now support removing the Confederate symbol.
  • Brief Prenatal Role-Play Predicts New Fathers’ Parenting Skills

    Brief Prenatal Role-Play Predicts New Fathers’ Parenting Skills
    A new study suggests a five-minute role-play done with men before the birth of their first child can predict the quality of their parenting after the baby arrives. The knowledge is helpful as parenting skills can be taught if the dad happens to not have the innate skills of knowing how to relate to the new baby.Researchers videotaped 182 expectant fathers during the third trimester of their partners’ pregnancy, observing how the men interacted with a doll that they were told represented th
  • COVID-19 May Indirectly Imperil Kids’ Mental, Physical Health

    COVID-19 May Indirectly Imperil Kids’ Mental, Physical Health
    Although children and young people may be less likely to get COVID-19 than older adults, a new U.K. study suggests they may face their own physical and mental difficulties.
    The findings are published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).
    “While children and young people seem rarely to be victims of severe COVID-19, we should anticipate that they will experience substantial indirect physical, social and mental health effects related to reduced access to health care and general pan
  • Walking Shelter Dogs May Ease Veterans’ PTSD Symptoms

    Walking Shelter Dogs May Ease Veterans’ PTSD Symptoms
    The U.S. is home to more than 21 million military veterans, and 20 percent of them suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Moreover, it is estimated that 20 veterans die of suicide each day, resulting in about 6,000 deaths by suicide each year.
    Florida Atlantic University researchers believe a new study exploring the human-animal bond could play an important role in helping ease the suffering of many vets.
    Human-animal interaction is known to reduce stress. Yet few studies have examin
  • Is ‘Mommy Brain’ A Real Thing?

    Is ‘Mommy Brain’ A Real Thing?
    “Mommy brain” is a long-held perception that mothers are more forgetful and less attentive.
    But a new study challenges that, showing that motherhood does not diminish attention.
    “In most studies, attention and memory tests are given to mothers very early postpartum,” said Valerie Tucker Miller, a Ph.D. student in Purdue University’s Department of Anthropology who is studying the effects of motherhood on attention, memory, and other psychological processes.
    “Th
  • Trump Tweets Video of Supporter Yelling "White Power"

    Source: Google News - HealthPresident Donald Trump shared a video of a verbal confrontation between anti-Trump protesters and his supporters, including a man who yelled “white power” at the demonstrators. The beginning of the video shows demonstrators yelling "racist" and "where’s your white hood" at a man and woman riding in a golf cart adorned with Trump signs. "Yeah, you got it," the man responds, pumping his fist. "White power."
  • Repeated Head Impacts Linked to Depression, Impaired Cognition

    Repeated Head Impacts Linked to Depression, Impaired Cognition
    Source: Psych CentralIn the largest study of its kind, a link has been found in living patients with repetitive head impacts and difficulties with cognitive functioning and depression years or decades later. Scientists have long suspected that a single traumatic brain injury earlier in life may contribute to problems with memory, thinking, and depression later in life. Most previous studies, however, failed to examine the role of repetitive head impacts.
  • Confronting One Form of Prejudice May Reduce Others

    Confronting One Form of Prejudice May Reduce Others
    Source: Psych CentralA new study suggests that when white people are confronted after expressing a bias about African Americans, they are less likely to display biases toward women. Likewise, when men are confronted after using a stereotype about women, they are less likely to show biases toward ethnic and racial minorities.
  • Calls Mount to Rename John Wayne Airport in Light of Racist Remarks

    Source: CNN - Top StoriesCalls are mounting to rename John Wayne Airport after a 1971 Playboy interview resurfaced in which the film star professed support of white supremacy and espoused derogatory views of African Americans, Native Americans, and movies with gay characters.
  • Bot Sends Free Suggestions of Books by Black Authors

    Source: CNN - Top StoriesLiz Moy, a 29-year-old programmer based in Brooklyn, wanted to help people educate themselves about anti-racism by reading more books by authors of color. Last week, she created a free bot that you can text for a recommendation of a book written by a Black author based on a genre of your choosing. The bot also links you to a Black-owned bookstore that is selling the title. It's simple—in the U.S., just text (409) 404-0403 to try it.
  • House Democrats Call for 100% Clean Cars by 2035

    House Democrats Call for 100% Clean Cars by 2035
    Source: Yahoo News - BusinessU.S. House Democrats plan to issue an ambitious proposal on Tuesday to combat climate change, a move intended to reassure their supporters but sure to inflame conservative opponents. The more than 500-page plan, from the Select Committee on the Climate Crisis convened by Speaker Nancy Pelosi, seeks to achieve net-zero emissions by 2050 and calls for achieving 100% clean vehicles by 2035.
  • Therapy May Beat Meds for Some Young People with Early Psychosis

    Therapy May Beat Meds for Some Young People with Early Psychosis
    New research from Australia suggests that some young people with early stage first-episode psychosis (FEP) can reduce symptoms and improve functioning with non-pharmaceutical intervention.
    Investigators from Orygen, a youth mental health center in Parkville near Melbourne, found that often young people respond well to psychological interventions and comprehensive case management.
    Psychosis is a symptom, not an illness, and it is more common than many believe. In the U.S., approximately 100,000 y
  • Lack of Boundaries Between Work & Personal Life Tied to Increased Stress

    Lack of Boundaries Between Work & Personal Life Tied to Increased Stress
    Information communication technologies such as smartphones and tablets allow employees to work anywhere and anytime, blurring the lines between work and nonwork.
    But having a lack of boundaries between work and nonwork life may lead to increased stress and mental health woes for workers, according to a team of researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign who study occupational stress and employee well-being.
    The team found that workers who exhibit greater “boundary control
  • Confrontation May Reduce White Prejudices

    Confrontation May Reduce White Prejudices
    A new study suggests that white people are likely to reflect on their racist or sexist statements and avoid making future mistakes after they are confronted with their prejudice.
    The findings, published in the journal Social Psychological and Personality Science, show that when white men and women were confronted after expressing a bias about African Americans, Latinos or women, they sought to identify and regulate their own biases regarding multiple groups of people.
    “Many people are relu
  • Sleeping With Partner Can Improve REM Sleep

    Sleeping With Partner Can Improve REM Sleep
    Songs and stories often lament “sleeping alone,” but mental and physical benefits or detriments of sharing a bed with another person are relatively unknown. Now a new German study finds that sleeping with a partner improves REM sleep, a sleep phase critical to emotional regulation and memory.
    Sleep studies are traditionally performed on single individuals in an isolated lab equipped with sophisticated technology. However, this practice does not consider how sharing a bed with a partn
  • Movie magic: ‘The cinema is my solace in times of crisis’

    Movie magic: ‘The cinema is my solace in times of crisis’
    The writer Simon Stephenson looks forward to the days when he can eat popcorn in the dark againAs a writer who works from home, my lockdown life has not been so different from my previous existence. Perhaps the biggest change is that I have not gone three months without visiting a cinema since I was a child. It seems a shameful thing to admit when others have been suffering so profoundly, but I have missed those movies on the big screen. They have been my lifelong companions, and I have lamented
  • After Hip Fracture, Suicide Risk for Elderly Nearly Triples

    After Hip Fracture, Suicide Risk for Elderly Nearly Triples
    A new South Korean study identifies that in the first six months following hip fracture elderly patients have a significant risk for suicide. The finding highlights the importance of addressing emotional and mental stress in addition to orthopedic care and musculoskeletal rehabilitation.
    Researchers discovered the risk of suicide was nearly three times greater among patients who had sustained a hip fracture compared with a matched cohort of those who had not. The increased risk continued for up
  • Repeated Head Impacts Linked to Depression, Impaired Cognition Later in Life

    Repeated Head Impacts Linked to Depression, Impaired Cognition Later in Life
    In the largest study of its kind, a link has been found in living patients exposed to repetitive head impacts and difficulties with cognitive functioning and depression years or decades later.
    Scientists have long believed that a single traumatic brain injury (TBI) earlier in life may contribute to problems with memory, thinking, and depression later in life. Most previous studies, however, failed to examine the role of repetitive head impacts, including those leading to “subconcussive&rdq
  • Why Do More Women Have Alzheimer’s Than Men?

    Why Do More Women Have Alzheimer’s Than Men?
    Middle-aged women are more likely than men to have changes in the brain related to Alzheimer’s disease, according to a new study.
    These changes were detected by two different types of brain imaging, and were seen even when there were no differences in thinking and memory in the women, according to researchers.
    The brain changes may be associated with hormonal changes due to menopause, specifically the loss of estrogen, the researchers hypothesized.
    “About two-thirds of people living
  • Planning for Aging Population in Low-Income Countries

    Planning for Aging Population in Low-Income Countries
    By 2050, the world’s older adult population (ages 60 and older) is expected to reach 2 billion, 80% of whom will live in low- and middle-income countries.
    Now, for the first time, a new study conducted by the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) makes projections of older adults with severe activity limitations for 23 low- and middle-income countries to help policymakers prepare for the challenges ahead.
    The findings are published in the journal Scientific Reports.
  • L'Oreal to Remove Words Like "Whitening" From Products

    L'Oreal to Remove Words Like "Whitening" From Products
    Source: Yahoo News - BusinessFrench cosmetics giant L'Oreal announced Saturday it was removing words like "whitening" from its products, against the backdrop of global anti-racism protests as big business wakes up to the issue. L'Oreal is the latest multinational corporation, after the likes of Unilever, Johnson & Johnson and Mars, to respond to the Black Lives Matter movement.
  • When the Toppled Statue Is of Your Great-Great-Great-Grandfather

    When the Toppled Statue Is of Your Great-Great-Great-Grandfather
    Source: Yahoo News - Top HeadlinesClayton Wickham, 28, said he used to think of the statue of his great-great-great-grandfather as "just a statue that had my name on it that was kind of cool to walk by every now and then." But as Wickham learned more about his ancestor, the statue became a source of discomfort and shame, so when protesters in Virginia tore down the bronze statue of Williams Carter Wickham—a Confederate general and plantation owner—Wickham was glad to see it fall.
  • Black Activists Wonder: Is Protesting Just Trendy for White People?

    Black Activists Wonder: Is Protesting Just Trendy for White People?
    Source: Yahoo News - Top HeadlinesGeorge Floyd’s death in police custody in Minneapolis pushed anguished Black people into the streets, as has happened countless times after police killings of Black people. But this time, Black protesters have been joined en masse by White people in rallies across the United States, which raises a question for long-dedicated Black activists: Will the commitment of white protesters endure?
  • How to Make Strategic and Impactful Donations

    How to Make Strategic and Impactful Donations
    Source: Yahoo News - BusinessOver the last month, our social media feeds have been full of actionable information on ways to aid the Black Lives Matter movement. Posts include facts about systemic racism and actions to take, like marching, signing petitions, calling our elected officials, and of course, donating money, but choosing where to start donating can be overwhelming.
  • U.S. State Department Says White Supremacy Rising Globally

    U.S. State Department Says White Supremacy Rising Globally
    Source: United Press International - Health NewsWhite supremacy and racially and ethnically motivated terrorism are on the rise in the United States and around the world, a new State Department report released Thursday said.
  • Trump Signs Executive Order Protecting Federal Monuments

    Trump Signs Executive Order Protecting Federal Monuments
    Source: United Press International - Health NewsPresident Donald Trump on Friday said he signed an executive order protecting U.S. monuments like those toppled in recent weeks for having connections to racism or slavery. Earlier, he tweeted that prison terms for such offenses would be up to 10 years.
  • Fair and Lovely: Can Renaming a Fairness Cream Stop Colorism?

    Source: Google News - HealthConsumer giant Unilever says it will rebrand its bestselling skin lightening cream Fair and Lovely and drop the word "fair" from its name. While the news has been welcomed, campaigners say the move doesn't go far enough—and in India, demand for such products shows no sign of waning.
  • Helicopter Parents Harm Adult Relationships and Educational Achievement

    Helicopter Parents Harm Adult Relationships and Educational Achievement
    New research suggests helicopter parenting may be detrimental rather than beneficial for an adolescent. In a longitudinal study, investigators found that overbearing and overcontrolling tactics by parents when children were 13 years old were associated with difficulties in social relationships and educational attainment by the time the teens reached age 32.
    Investigators note that although the study did not establish causation, the evidence suggests a parenting style that is psychologically cont
  • Using Phone in a Work Meeting May Leave a Bad Impression

    Using Phone in a Work Meeting May Leave a Bad Impression
    To make a better impression at a business meeting, keep your cell phone out of sight, even if you’re using it for something work-related like taking notes, according to a new study conducted at the University of Kansas.
    For the study, researchers prepared video clips of people using either a paper notebook, a cell phone or a laptop computer while participating in a business meeting. Then they asked 243 viewers to rate the meeting member’s competence and the effectiveness of the meeti

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