• Down to earth: how escaping to the country isn’t always what it seems

    Down to earth: how escaping to the country isn’t always what it seems
    When Rebecca Schiller swapped the city for a rural dream life seemed idyllic. But however far you go, you can’t escape your self… Winter has hung around this year as though even the seasons are waiting for government permission to unlock. Despite spring’s late arrival on the smallholding, Amber has gone into labour early. It’s just me and her in the kidding pen; me muttering soft, nonsensical words of encouragement, her bleating through contractions and resting against m
  • Poland, Hungary Oppose "Gender Equality" Phrase at EU Social Summit

    Poland, Hungary Oppose "Gender Equality" Phrase at EU Social Summit
    Source: U.S. News and World ReportLobbying by Poland and Hungary has led to the removal of the phrase "gender equality" from a draft declaration on advancing social cohesion that the EU is due to publish on Friday, according to diplomats. Poland's nationalist ruling Law and Justice party and its eurosceptic ally, Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban, promote what they call traditional social values at home.
  • Hollywood Has Sordid History with Portrayals of Mental Illness

    Source: USA Today - Top StoriesThere are times when Hollywood hasn't been kind in its depictions of mental illness. Think back to the portrayal of those with mental health conditions in Alfred Hitchcock's 1960 thriller "Psycho" or the way shows like "Full House" and "Pretty Little Liars" used eating disorders as one-time plot devices. For Mental Health Awareness Month, a group of major entertainment figures came together to discuss how they can remedy that.
  • German Call to Ban "Jewish Star" at COVID Demonstrations

    German Call to Ban "Jewish Star" at COVID Demonstrations
    Source: BBC News - EuropeGermany's anti-Semitism commissioner, Felix Klein, has urged authorities to stop protesters using the Nazis' yellow star forced on Jews in World War Two. Some protesters have replaced the word "Jude" (Jew) with the phrase "ungeimpft" (unvaccinated), equating COVID restrictions with the persecution of Europe's Jewish population. The yellow Star of David has also been seen in protests in London.
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  • Fear of Losing Insurance Keeps 1 in 6 U.S. Workers in Their Jobs

    Fear of Losing Insurance Keeps 1 in 6 U.S. Workers in Their Jobs
    Source: United Press International - Health NewsMany American workers remain in jobs they'd rather leave—simply because they don't want to lose their health insurance, a new Gallup poll reveals. That's the situation for 16% of respondents in a nationwide poll of adults conducted March 15-21, 2021. Workers with annual household incomes below $48,000 are most likely—28%—to stay put in order to keep health benefits, and three times more likely to do so than workers in households m
  • Exercise Aids the Cognitive Development of Children Born Preterm

    Source: Science Daily - Top SocietyA premature start in life can cause problems that persist well into teenage years. A new study suggests, however, that training motor skills in these children can help even when they are older. The study, published in the journal Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience, concluded that motor skills training when children are 9 to 13 years old reduces cognitive deficits among children born very preterm.
  • Hurray, I can meet people! Now, when can I get some alone time? | Coco Khan

    Hurray, I can meet people! Now, when can I get some alone time? | Coco Khan
    Could it be that I, a committed extrovert who talks to strangers, had become an introvert during the pandemic?To quote James Brown: I feel good, I knew that I would. Britain has opened up. Into a restaurant I leap, on to a beautician’s bed I spring, and into a shop I hop, to try on sunglasses and flirt with the salesperson, who is almost certainly reciprocating for money. Still, in-person interaction with strangers! These days I skip home.But recently one evening I found myself alone, prop
  • Increasing Reports of the Coronavirus Leading to "COVID Psychosis"

    Source: USA Today - Top StoriesBen Price always was the biggest presence in any room. Loud and funny, his smile was captivating, said his wife, Jennifer. "He was the epitome of unconditional love and loved his kids with all his heart," she said. Price tells herself it wasn’t her husband who died by suicide on the morning of February 28. She believes he was taken over by what some health care professionals call "COVID psychosis." The thought keeps grief from swallowing her...
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  • Psychology Association Wins Two Major Public Service Awards

    Source: APA Press ReleasesThe 2020 work of the American Psychological Association (APA) has received two prestigious honors: a "World Changing Ideas Award" from Fast Company magazine for its yearlong response to the COVID-19 pandemic, and a "Gold Circle Merit Award" from the American Society of Association Executives for APA's flagship podcast, "Speaking of Psychology," ended 2020 with more than 2 million downloads.
  • Youngest Kids in Class More Likely to Be Diagnosed with Learning Disability

    Source: Science Daily - Top SocietyChildren born in December, in school districts with a December 31 cut-off date, are almost twice as likely to be diagnosed with a learning disorder as those born in January, a new study has found. The new research included children born in Finland between 1996 and 2002. Of nearly 400,000 children, 3,000 were diagnosed with a specific learning disorder, for example, in reading, writing, or math by the age of ten.
  • Utah Affirms Transgender Right to Change Birth Certificates

    Source: U.S. News and World ReportThe Utah Supreme Court affirmed the right of transgender people to change their sex designation on birth certificates Thursday, a ruling that came as a bright spot for advocates amid a wave of legislation targeting transgender people around the country. Every U.S. state except Tennessee allows people to change their gender markers on birth certificates, though Montana lawmakers this year added a requirement for people to have surgery beforehand.
  • Frieze New York Art Fair: Seeing Black Lives Differently

    Frieze New York Art Fair: Seeing Black Lives Differently
    Source: U.S. News and World ReportAt the Frieze Art Fair in New York, over 60 leading galleries are paying tribute to social justice, showing works by the world's most influential artists. The goal is to change how we see the world by examining art's role in portraying race and citizenship. It expands on The Vision & Justice Project, a landmark 2016 issue by Aperture magazine on photography and African American experiences.
  • Shining New Light on Stepparent Fairy-Tale Stereotype

    Source: Science Daily - Top HealthAlthough the fairy tale of the wicked stepmother is a tale as old as time, the effects of blending children with their new stepfamilies may not be as grim as once thought. In fact, new research shows that stepchildren are not at a disadvantage compared to their peers from single-parent households and actually experience better outcomes than their half-siblings—good news for the more than 113 million Americans that are part of a step-relationship.
  • Remembering Ed Diener

    Remembering Ed Diener
    By Kathryn Britton -
    It is with heavy hearts that Senia Maymin and I invite you to join us as we reflect on the life of Dr. Ed Diener.Ed died on April 27, ending his long and productive career as a teacher, researcher, and policy advisor.He started studying happiness when nobody believed that made any sense. Since then, he has touched so many people, both directly and indirectly through his family, his students, his clients, his textbooks, and his impact on public policy. He was also fun to be a
  • People with Familial Longevity Show Better Cognitive Aging

    Source: Science Daily - Top SocietyIf you come from a family where people routinely live well into old age, you will likely have better cognitive function (the ability to clearly think, learn, and remember) than peers from families where people die younger. Researchers affiliated with the Long Life Family Study recently broadened that finding in a paper published in Gerontology, suggesting that people who belong to long-lived families also show slower cognitive decline over time.
  • European Space Agency to Welcome Physically Disabled Astronauts

    European Space Agency to Welcome Physically Disabled Astronauts
    Source: Canadian Broadcasting Company - World NewsSince humans began to have a presence in space, only about 550 people have been in orbit around our planet. That's because astronauts are considered the elite: well-educated, in peak physical health, and skilled. There has been, however, a group who have been left out of the running, no matter how well-educated, fit, or skilled they are: people with physical disabilities. The European Space Agency is aiming to change that.
  • Cutting Methane Quickly Key to Curbing Dangerous Warming

    Source: ABC News - Science and TechnologyCutting the super-potent greenhouse gas methane quickly and deeply is the world’s best hope to slow and limit the worst of global warming, a new United Nations report says. If human-caused methane emissions—a common byproduct of the meat and dairy industries—are cut by nearly in half by 2030, a half degree (0.3 degrees Celsius) of warming can be prevented by mid-century, according to Thursday's report by the United Nations Environment Pr
  • Trans Killings Hit Record High in U.S., With Puerto Rico at Epicenter

    Source: USA Today - U.S. NewsPuerto Rico accounted for six of last year's 44 transgender killings in the U.S., and another six in 2021. The victims ranged in age from 19 to 33. Most were shot multiple times. Two were burned in a car. One was stalked and killed on her birthday, the incident coldly documented on social media. Only one case has produced arrests, and it was handled not by Puerto Rico police but by the U.S. Department of Justice, which is prosecuting it as a...
  • Being Around Children Makes Adults More Generous, Study Suggests

    Source: Science Daily - Top HealthAdults are more compassionate and up to twice as likely to donate to charity when children are present, according to a new study. The research, conducted by British social psychologists, examined how the presence of children influences adults' compassionate motivations and behaviors. In a field investigation, for example, adult passersby on a shopping street were more likely to donate to charity when children were salient.
  • Top U.S. General Urges Greater Racial Diversity in Military

    Top U.S. General Urges Greater Racial Diversity in Military
    Source: U.S. News and World ReportThe U.S. military must widen opportunity and improve advancement for Black service members, who remain vastly underrepresented in some areas, including among Air Force pilots and in the most senior ranks, the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff said Wednesday. General Mark Milley told a Howard University ROTC commissioning ceremony that diversity is an important strength of the military but is still inadequate. "We must get better," he said.
  • Home of San Francisco's 1st Same-Sex Spouses Now a Landmark

    Home of San Francisco's 1st Same-Sex Spouses Now a Landmark
    Source: U.S. News and World ReportThe hilltop cottage belonging to a lesbian couple who were the first same-sex partners to legally marry in San Francisco has become a city landmark. The Board of Supervisors voted unanimously Tuesday to give the 651 Duncan Street home of the late lesbian activists Phyllis Lyon and Del Martin landmark status. The home is expected to become the first lesbian landmark in the U.S. West, the San Francisco Chronicle reported.
  • Dietary Tool Aims to Cut Disease, Climate Change Risks

    Dietary Tool Aims to Cut Disease, Climate Change Risks
    Source: Science and Development NetworkResearchers have created a new dietary tool that they say could be used to simultaneously cut the risk of disease and climate change impacts. The tool, unveiled in a report last month, has been applied in regions across the world including Sub-Saharan Africa, South Asia, and Latin America, taking into account cultural differences in the consumption of food.
  • Vintage Greyhound Bus Is Restored to Commemorate the Freedom Rides

    Source: CNN - Top StoriesAn Alabama museum unveiled a restored Greyhound bus Tuesday in honor of the 60th anniversary of the Freedom Riders who fought for desegregation in bus terminals. The unveiling of the bus, which was in service during the time of the Freedom Rides in 1961, coincides with the 60th anniversary of when the first Freedom Riders left Washington, DC, for New Orleans to challenge segregation, even after Supreme Court had outlawed it.
  • U.S. Birth Rate Falls to Its Lowest Point Ever

    U.S. Birth Rate Falls to Its Lowest Point Ever
    Source: BBC News - AmericasThe U.S. birth rate fell for the sixth consecutive year in 2020, reaching a historic low, according to a new report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Some 3.6 million babies were born in the U.S. in 2020, marking a 4% decline from the year before—a decrease seen across all recorded ethnicities and origins. This slowing of the U.S. birth rate is echoed by worldwide trends, say experts.
  • ‘We can’t afford not to act’: experts on their hopes for mental health in Australia's budget | Ian Hickie, Hazel Dalton, Tegan Carrison, Tamara Cavenett

    ‘We can’t afford not to act’: experts on their hopes for mental health in Australia's budget | Ian Hickie, Hazel Dalton, Tegan Carrison, Tamara Cavenett
    Australia needs to start flattening the mental health curve urgently. The coming budget is an opportunity for actionThe 2021 federal budget has been heralded as the point at which the Morrison government will respond, at scale, to the many failings of the mental health system. We spend only $10.6bn a year providing mental health services to over 4 million people. Importantly, there is an increasing divide between the federal government’s reporting and the independent accounting of what mon
  • ‘We can’t afford not to act’: experts on their hopes for mental health in Australia's budget | Ian Hickie, Hazel Dalton, Tegan Carrison

    ‘We can’t afford not to act’: experts on their hopes for mental health in Australia's budget | Ian Hickie, Hazel Dalton, Tegan Carrison
    Australia needs to start flattening the mental health curve urgently. The coming budget is an opportunity for actionThe 2021 federal budget has been heralded as the point at which the Morrison government will respond, at scale, to the many failings of the mental health system. We spend only $10.6bn a year providing mental health services to over 4 million people. Importantly, there is an increasing divide between the federal government’s reporting and the independent accounting of what mon
  • ‘We can’t afford not to act’: Experts on their hopes for mental health in the budget | Ian Hickie, Hazel Dalton, Tegan Carrison

    ‘We can’t afford not to act’: Experts on their hopes for mental health in the budget | Ian Hickie, Hazel Dalton, Tegan Carrison
    Australia needs to start flattening the mental health curve urgently. The coming budget is an opportunity for actionThe 2021 federal budget has been heralded as the point at which the Morrison government will respond, at scale, to the many failings of the mental health system. We spend only $10.6bn pa providing mental health services to over 4 million people. Importantly, there is an increasing divide between the federal government’s reporting and the independent accounting of what monies
  • Transgender Soccer Referee Makes Israeli Sports History

    Source: CNN - Top StoriesSapir Berman made sports history on Monday, officiating at a soccer match in Israel's Premier League for the first time since coming out as transgender. "This is the first step in a long and wonderful journey. Sapir, we are proud to do it with you," the Israel Football Association tweeted as she took the field for the contest between Beitar Jerusalem and Hapoel Haifa.
  • Socially Distanced Proms Bring Joy After a Tough Year

    Source: USA Today - Top StoriesAlyssa Smith's pandemic prom looked nothing like the storied senior dances from movies and TV. Carefully applied makeup was concealed behind face masks and the dancing was constricted, limited to painted squares carefully outlined on a football field. Students spent intervals of the night snacking on prepackaged, individual meals. It was "pretty weird," she said, but still magical.
  • Short-Term Air Pollution Exposure Can Impede Cognition; Aspirin May Help

    Source: Science Daily - Top HealthExposure to air pollution, even over the course of just a few weeks, can impede mental performance, according to a new study. However, these adverse effects were lessened in people taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) like aspirin. The study is among the first to explore short-term air pollution exposures and the use of NSAIDs to mitigate their effects.
  • COVID-19 Anxieties Still High in U.S. One Year Into Pandemic

    COVID-19 Anxieties Still High in U.S. One Year Into Pandemic
    Source: United Press International - Health NewsAmericans' anxiety and concerns about COVID-19 remain high a year into the pandemic, and mental health effects of the health crisis are on the rise, a new survey shows. Hispanic people, at 73%, and Black people, at 76%, are more anxious about COVID-19 than White people, at 59%, according to the American Psychiatric Association online survey of 1,000 U.S. adults.
  • Can’t leave your phone alone? You’re just trying to blend in

    Can’t leave your phone alone? You’re just trying to blend in
    Keep checking your smartphone without knowing why? You may be unconsciously copying those around you, according to Italian research into the ‘chameleon effect’
    Name: The Chameleon Effect.Age: About 22 years old. It was discovered and named by the sociologist John A Bargh and the social psychologist Tanya L Chartrand, who published a paper about it in 1999. Continue reading...
  • Activist Thunberg Says Global Leaders Still in Denial Over Climate

    Activist Thunberg Says Global Leaders Still in Denial Over Climate
    Source: U.S. News and World ReportPoliticians, including Sweden's leaders, are still in denial over the threat from climate change, environmental activist Greta Thunberg said on Monday after meeting Sweden's Prime Minister Stefan Lofven. "We climate activists have had, I don't know how many meetings with the people in power and it is, basically, the same discussion every time—there is a complete denial," Thunberg told reporters after the meeting. "The sense of crisis is...
  • Idaho's Transgender Sports Ban Faces a Major Legal Hurdle

    Source: Google News - HealthDo transgender women and girls have a constitutional right to play on women's sports teams? That question will be argued before the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals on Monday. The landmark case stems from an Idaho law passed last year — the nation's first transgender sports ban. The outcome of this case is seen as a bellwether for the numerous other transgender sports bans that have been approved around the country this year.
  • Free will debate rages on, or is it all an illusion? | Letters

    Free will debate rages on, or is it all an illusion? | Letters
    Readers reflect on the role of chance, randomness and responsibility in their own livesWhat high-quality letters (29 April) on free will. My A-level psychology students always found this fascinating and usually thought that free will was obvious until they had examined their own lives and realised that “soft determinism”, well-expounded by Robert Dimmick, was the likely answer. However, there is a big role for chance.For example, I probably wouldn’t have been born in 1949 if my
  • Starting Off Mental Health Awareness Month With Self-Care

    Source: USA Today - Top StoriesSaying this past year was tough is an understatement. No matter the challenges you've gone through, the pandemic has impacted our mental health in different ways. For Mental Health Awareness month, which kicks off Saturday, we've rounded up some ways you can put the focus back on you with some self-care.
  • One in Three Kids Develop Mental Health Problem After Concussion

    Source: Science Daily - Top NewsA third of children and adolescents develop a mental health problem after a concussion, which could persist for several years post-injury, according to a new literature review. The review analyzed 69 articles published between 1980 and 2020, involving nearly 90,000 children from nine countries.
  • More Kids and Teens Visited ERs for Mental Health During Pandemic

    More Kids and Teens Visited ERs for Mental Health During Pandemic
    Source: United Press International - Health NewsEmergency room visits by younger people for mental health-related problems at one U.S. hospital increased by 50% in 2020, likely due in large part to the COVID-19 pandemic, a study published Friday by JAMA Network Open found.
  • Calls for Empathy and Aid As India Weathers Crisis

    Source: USA Today - Top StoriesRight now, India is battling an unrelenting COVID-19 surge. People are dying at record numbers, with 3,498 deaths recorded on Thursday alone, according to data from Johns Hopkins University. Hospitals are understaffed and overwhelmed, and doctors are turning to social media to beg for oxygen canisters as patients die in droves. Others are calling for empathy and action from the wider world.
  • Mend your clothes and do yourself some good

    Mend your clothes and do yourself some good
    Care and repair is an invaluable mantra for your wardrobe, your mental health, your wallet and the planetIn today’s society, many of us go through our whole lives without ever working with our hands; we live, we work, we eat, we buy, we repeat. Everything is made and delivered at a blistering rate, from fast food to fast fashion and, although this may keep the economy buoyant, it’s not necessarily good for our mental health, or for our planet.But during the past year of lockdown, we
  • The battle for free will in the face of determinism | Letters

    The battle for free will in the face of determinism | Letters
    Oliver Burkeman’s long read pitches philosophical readers against the more scientifically minded onesI read the online version of Oliver Burkeman’s long read that raises the question of whether free will is an illusion, and shortly afterwards read the same article again in print (The clockwork universe, Journal, 27 April). I was surprised when I realised that the brief reference to quantum physics online was missing in the printed version. Was it simply a matter of space, or was it l
  • Long Covid: why psychological therapies may have limited benefits | Letter

    Long Covid: why psychological therapies may have limited benefits | Letter
    Dr Dominic Salisbury says poor-quality evidence lies behind some treatments such as CBT In reviewing the possible role of psychology in treating long Covid (Long Covid is very far from ‘all in the mind’ – but psychology can still help us treat it, 27 April), Dr Carmine Pariante misrepresents why many ME/chronic fatigue syndrome patients remain sceptical about psychological interventions such as cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT). It is not because we deny the important overlap
  • Czech Lawmakers Give Nod to Same-Sex Marriage; Final Vote Uncertain

    Czech Lawmakers Give Nod to Same-Sex Marriage; Final Vote Uncertain
    Source: U.S. News and World ReportA same-sex marriage bill in the Czech Republic cleared an early hurdle in the lower house of parliament on Thursday, but whether it will become law is uncertain with a general election less than six months away. The legislation has languished for three years in parliament and has split parliamentary factions as lawmakers voted both in favor and against within their parties.
  • German Court Orders Revision of Climate Act to Ease Burden on Youth

    Source: Google News - HealthGermany's highest court ruled in a landmark case on Thursday that some aspects of the country's climate protection legislation are unconstitutional because they place too much of a burden for reducing greenhouse gas emissions on younger generations. The court gave the government until the end of next year to set clearer targets for reducing emissions starting in 2031, calling the current provisions "incompatible with fundamental rights."
  • Biden Tells Transgender Americans That He Has Their Back

    Source: CNN - Top StoriesPresident Joe Biden pledged his support for transgender Americans during his address to a joint session of Congress on Wednesday, telling members of the community he's standing by them at a time when they face a barrage of attacks by GOP-led state legislatures. "To all transgender Americans watching at home—especially young people, who are so brave—I want you to know your president has your back," Biden said during his address.
  • A Psychologist's Guide to Donating More Effectively to Charities

    Source: Science Daily - Top NewsThe decision to donate to a charity is often driven by emotion rather than by calculated assessments based on how to make the biggest impact. In a review article published in the journal Trends in Cognitive Sciences, researchers look at what they call "the psychology of (in)effective altruism" and how people can be encouraged to make charitable contributions that get more bang for the buck, increasing donors' influence.
  • Switzerland to Hold Referendum on 2020 Law Allowing Same-Sex Marriage

    Switzerland to Hold Referendum on 2020 Law Allowing Same-Sex Marriage
    Source: United Press International - Health NewsSwitzerland will hold a national vote on whether to keep a 2020 law allowing same-sex couples to marry, the country's Federal Chancellery said. The court ruled Tuesday that opponents of the law had gathered enough valid signatures—61,027—to put the issue to a national referendum. Supporters, meanwhile, submitted their own petition with 107,000 signatures to keep the law.
  • White Supremacists Bigger Threat Than Foreign Terrorists, Says Biden

    Source: USA Today - Top StoriesPresident Joe Biden identified White supremacy as a domestic terror threat that the country must remain vigilant against in his first joint address to Congress on Wednesday. In discussing his order to withdraw American troops from Afghanistan, Biden noted global terror networks have largely moved beyond the country and that White supremacists posed a bigger threat than foreign actors.
  • Gender-Affirming Surgeries Improve Mental Health in Young

    Gender-Affirming Surgeries Improve Mental Health in Young
    Source: United Press International - Health NewsWhen gender-diverse or transgender people have surgeries to affirm their gender, they experience a variety of positive mental health outcomes, new research suggests. The study found a link between the surgeries, which participants had at least two years prior to a survey, and significantly lower rates of past-month psychological distress and past-year suicidal ideation, compared to people who had not had gender-affirming surgery but wanted it.
  • CVS Offers Mental Health Counseling in Stores

    Source: Google News - HealthThe company is leading the way in trying to fill gaps in access to mental health by piloting a counseling service in some of its retail stores. And by negotiating with insurance companies to cover visits, it's also trying to reduce the cost of mental health care. The idea is to create a place where consumers can get eye exams, diabetes screenings and vaccinations as well as mental health treatment, where they already buy their prescriptions.

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