• US returns to Cambodia dozens of antiquities looted from historic sites

    US returns to Cambodia dozens of antiquities looted from historic sites
    Some of the artefacts, which range from the bronze age to the 12th century, were stolen from ancient Khmer capital Koh KerThe United States will return to Cambodia 30 looted antiquities, including bronze and stone statues of Buddhist and Hindu deities carved more than 1,000 years ago, US officials have said.The south-east Asian country’s archaeological sites – including Koh Ker, a capital of the ancient Khmer empire – suffered widespread looting in civil conflicts between the 1
  • Rulers who weren’t kings, discussed at Leeds

    Rulers who weren’t kings, discussed at Leeds
    I have as usual to apologise for a gap in posting. I mentioned the Covid-19; then I was on holiday; and then I was late with a chapter submission that I finished, on overtime, yesterday. Much of this post was written before that all started piling up, but I’ve only today had time to finish it. I was originally going to give you another source translation for the first time in ages, but it turns out that even though I translated the relevant thing fresh in 2019, two other people had already
  • Discoveries in Pompeii reveal lives of lower and middle classes

    Discoveries in Pompeii reveal lives of lower and middle classes
    Archaeologists are enriching our knowledge about those who were ‘vulnerable class during political crises and food shortages’ A trunk with its lid left open, a wooden dishware closet and a three-legged accent table topped by decorative bowls. These are among the latest discoveries by archaeologists that are enriching knowledge about middle-class lives in Pompeii before Mount Vesuvius’s furious eruption buried the ancient Roman city in volcanic debris.Pompeii’s archaeologi
  • Life in litter: Mariana Castillo Deball’s remarkable Roman Rubbish

    Life in litter: Mariana Castillo Deball’s remarkable Roman Rubbish
    The Mexican artist’s new exhibition uses Roman detritus to suggest that we can tell more about a society by what it throws out than the culture it preservesWhen Mariana Castillo Deball was invited to create an exhibition responding to the Roman relics in London’s Mithraeum collection, it was its local quality and patchy treatment that first struck her. “It’s the opposite of the British Museum, where artefacts have been taken in suspicious circumstances from all over the w
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  • Current Archaeology 390 – ON SALE NOW

    Current Archaeology 390 – ON SALE NOW
    With enormous capstones perched precariously on stone supports, Neolithic dolmens appear to defy gravity – and, in some cases, interpretation. Why were these mighty monuments built across northern Europe, and were their stone frames intended to impress, or originally concealed within earth mounds? Our cover story investigates the options.
    Equally monumental in construction, though very different in nature, are the frontier fortifications of Hadrian’s Wall. How did the Romans source
  • Excavating the CA archive: Worcestershire and Warwickshire

    Excavating the CA archive: Worcestershire and Warwickshire
    Joe Flatman explores half a century of reports from the past.A selection of articles mentioned by Joe Flatman in this month’s column below can be accessed for free for one month via Exact Editions, from 4 August. Use the links within the text to jump to the individual articles, or click on the covers below. Print subscribers can add digital access to their account for just £12 a year – this includes everything from the last 50 years, right back to Issue 1! Call our dedicated su
  • Designed to enchant: the great dolmens of Neolithic northern Europe

    Designed to enchant: the great dolmens of Neolithic northern Europe
    The word ‘dolmen’ – derived from the Breton taol maen (‘stone table’) – is regarded as a folk term for Neolithic monuments that consist of a massive capstone supported by three or more upright stones, or orthostats. Archaeologists have sought to subdivide these monuments into more precise typological categories, but Vicki Cummings and Colin Richards, the authors of Monuments in the Making, politely suggest that they are wrong to do so. Is it time to reclaim t
  • Fears over building works at Afghan Buddhas of Bamiyan site

    Fears over building works at Afghan Buddhas of Bamiyan site
    Unesco says it has not been consulted on project and local experts are alarmed at Taliban plansThe Taliban have launched construction work on a tourism complex just metres from the cliff that held the Bamiyan Buddha statues, which archeologists and experts warn could cause permanent damage to the sensitive world heritage site.The project aims to “rebuild” a historic bazaar, which was destroyed in the civil war of the 1990s. Under the Taliban blueprint, the area will become a tourism
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  • HMS Invincible: excavating a Georgian time capsule

    HMS Invincible: excavating a Georgian time capsule
    In its heyday, HMS Invincible was considered one of the finest ships in the Royal Navy – and although it sank off Portsmouth in 1758, its remains represent the best-preserved 18th-century warship known in UK waters. Carly Hilts spoke to Daniel Pascoe, who headed recent excavations of the wreck, and visited an exhibition currently running at The Historic Dockyard Chatham to find out more.Just as the Titanic’s ‘unsinkable’ nickname proved to be somewhat hubristic, naming a
  • Current Archaeology 389 – ON SALE NOW

    Current Archaeology 389 – ON SALE NOW
    Built in 1744 and captured from the French three years later, HMS Invincible was considered one of the finest ships in the Georgian Royal Navy. Its innovative design gave it many technical advantages over British vessels, and it was eagerly copied by shipwrights – but in 1758, the Invincible sank off Portsmouth. The wreck was undisturbed for over 200 years, but now archaeologists exploring its well-preserved hull – still packed with provisions and the possessions of its crew –
  • Current Archaeology 389

    Current Archaeology 389
    Built in 1744 and captured from the French three years later, HMS Invincible was considered one of the finest ships in the Georgian Royal Navy. Its innovative design gave it many technical advantages over British vessels, and it was eagerly copied by shipwrights – but in 1758, the Invincible sank off Portsmouth. The wreck was undisturbed for over 200 years, but now archaeologists exploring its well-preserved hull – still packed with provisions and the possessions of its crew –
  • Excavating the CA archive: Suffolk

    Excavating the CA archive: Suffolk
    Joe Flatman explores half a century of reports from the past.A selection of articles mentioned by Joe Flatman in this month’s column below can be accessed for free for one month via Exact Editions, from 7 July. Use the links within the text to jump to the individual articles, or click on the covers below. Print subscribers can add digital access to their account for just £12 a year – this includes everything from the last 50 years, right back to Issue 1! Call our dedicated subs
  • The greening ashore

    The greening ashore
    It took several hundred million years after the formation of Earth some 4½ billion years ago for the initially fiery globe to cool down, allowing the first oceans and land masses to form. The land was barren rock for the next three billion years.
    The diversity of flora and fauna as we know them today and the substrate on which they thrive are
     thanks to a single species of algae that first went ashore more than 500 million years ago. This
    and all other drawings in the publication ar
  • Plant study hints evolution may be predictable

    Plant study hints evolution may be predictable
    Evolution has long been viewed as a rather random process, with the traits of species shaped by chance mutations and environmental events -- and therefore largely unpredictable.
    Similar leaf types evolved independently in three species of plants found in cloud forests of Oaxaca,
     Mexico and three species of plants in similar environment in Chiapas, Mexico. This example of
     parallel evolution is one of several found by Yale-led scientists and suggests that evolutionmay be predictable [
  • Mammals were not the first to be warm-blooded

    Mammals were not the first to be warm-blooded
    Endothermy, or warm-bloodedness, is the ability of mammals and birds to produce their own body heat and control their body temperature. 
    A warm-blooded mammal ancestor breathing out hot hair
    in a frigid night [Credit: Luzia Soares]
    This major difference with the cold-blooded reptiles underpins the ecological dominance of mammals in almost every ecosystem globally. Until now, it was not known exactly when endothermy originated in mammalian ancestry. A team of international scientists, inclu
  • North 'plaza' in Cahokia was likely inundated year-round, study finds

    North 'plaza' in Cahokia was likely inundated year-round, study finds
    The ancient North American city of Cahokia had as its focal point a feature now known as Monks Mound, a giant earthwork surrounded on its north, south, east and west by large rectangular open areas. These flat zones, called plazas by archaeologists since the early 1960s, were thought to serve as communal areas that served the many mounds and structures of the city.
    The study focused on the north plaza, an expanse at a low elevation that is almostalways inundated with water [Credit: Caitlin Rank
  • Earliest English medieval shipwreck site uncovered off Dorset coast

    Earliest English medieval shipwreck site uncovered off Dorset coast
    Maritime archaeologists from Bournemouth University have uncovered the remains of a medieval ship and its cargo dating back to the 13th century off the coast of Dorset. The survival of the vessel is extremely rare and there are no known wrecks of seagoing ships from the 11th to the 14th centuries in English waters. The discovery makes this the earliest English designated wreck site where hull remains can be seen.
    Diver viewing a decorated Purbeck stone gravestone on the 13th century 'Mortar Wre
  • Study sheds light on penguin evolution

    Study sheds light on penguin evolution
    An international team of 40 researchers analyzed the genomes—the complete set of DNA—of all living and recently extinct penguin species and combined this with the fossil record to gain new insights into the key events and processes that shaped the evolution of these iconic birds. The study, published in Nature Communications, is the first comprehensive genetic study involving extinct and extant (living) penguin species.
    Adelie penguin at Rothera Research Station [Credit: Billy Thurs
  • Prehistoric fish led by their nose

    Prehistoric fish led by their nose
    The evolution of the brain and nervous system in animals has been wound back more than 400 million years, thanks to the examination of fossil remains of ancient lungfish providing a missing link in the emergence of land-living, four-legged animals on Earth.
    Cranial endocast of a Palaeozoic lungfish [Credit: A Clement, Flinders University]
    An international study, led by Flinders University in Australia, has compared detailed 3D models of cranial endocasts from six Paleozoic lungfish (Dipnoi) fos
  • The hippo and the hydra

    The hippo and the hydra
    A new study describes the formation of the body axis in the immortal freshwater polyp Hydra. It is controlled by the so-called hippo signalling pathway, a molecular biological process that, among other functions, ensures that our organs do not continue to grow indefinitely. The study was led by the Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute in Toronto and the Washington University School of Medicine. The Department of Zoology of the University of Innsbruck, Austria, was significantly involved in th
  • Oldest European salamander fossil, discovered in Scotland

    Oldest European salamander fossil, discovered in Scotland
    Fossils discovered in Scotland represent some of the world's oldest salamanders, according to a new study led by UCL researchers.
    Artist's impression of Marmorerpeton wakei [Credit: Brennan Stokkermans]
    The research team analyzed 166-million-year-old fossils of a type of animal called Marmorerpeton, found in Middle Jurassic rocks on the Isle of Skye.
    They found that it has several key salamander traits, but is not part of the modern group of salamanders. Their results are reported in Proceeding
  • After 350 years, sea gives up lost jewels of Spanish shipwreck

    After 350 years, sea gives up lost jewels of Spanish shipwreck
    Marine archaeologists stunned by priceless cache long hidden beneath the Bahamas’ shark-infested watersIt was a Spanish galleon laden with treasures so sumptuous that its sinking in the Bahamas in 1656 sparked repeated salvage attempts over the next 350 years. So when another expedition was launched recently, few thought that there could be anything left – but exquisite, jewel-encrusted pendants and gold chains are among spectacular finds that have now been recovered, having lain unt
  • In search of the lost Parthian city of Natounia

    In search of the lost Parthian city of Natounia
    The mountain fortress of Rabana-Merquly in modern Iraqi Kurdistan was one of the major regional centres of the Parthian Empire, which extended over parts of Iran and Mesopotamia approximately 2,000 years ago. This is a conclusion reached by a team of archaeologists led by Dr Michael Brown, a researcher at the Institute of Prehistory, Protohistory and Near-Eastern Archaeology of Heidelberg University. Together with Iraqi colleagues, Brown studied the remains of the fortress. Their work provides
  • New research demonstrates connections between climate change and civil unrest among the ancient Maya

    New research demonstrates connections between climate change and civil unrest among the ancient Maya
    An extended period of turmoil in the prehistoric Maya city of Mayapan, in the Yucatan region of Mexico, was marked by population declines, political rivalries and civil conflict. Between 1441 and 1461 CE the strife reached an unfortunate crescendo -- the complete institutional collapse and abandonment of the city. This all occurred during a protracted drought. Coincidence? Not likely, finds new research by anthropologist and professor Douglas Kennett of UC Santa Barbara.
    Central Mayapan showing
  • When did the genetic variations that make us human emerge?

    When did the genetic variations that make us human emerge?
    The study of the genomes of our closest relatives, the Neanderthals and Denisovans, has opened up new research paths that can broaden our understanding of the evolutionary history of Homo sapiens. A study led by the University of Barcelona has made an estimation of the time when some of the genetic variants that characterise our species emerged. It does so by analysing mutations that are very frequent in modern human populations, but not in these other species of archaic humans.
    Credit: Univers
  • Evolving to outpace climate change, tiny marine animal provides new evidence of long-theorized genetic mechanism

    Evolving to outpace climate change, tiny marine animal provides new evidence of long-theorized genetic mechanism
    Some copepods, diminutive crustaceans with an outsized place in the aquatic food web, can evolve fast enough to survive in the face of rapid climate change, according to new research that addresses a longstanding question in the field of genetics.
    Several species of copepods and one ostracod are shown here [Credit: NOAA]
    Barely more than a millimeter long, the copepod Eurytemora affinis paddles its way through the coastal waters of oceans and estuaries around the world in large numbers -- mostl
  • DNA from ancient population in Southern China suggests Native Americans' East Asian roots

    DNA from ancient population in Southern China suggests Native Americans' East Asian roots
    For the first time, researchers successfully sequenced the genome of ancient human fossils from the Late Pleistocene in southern China. The data, published in the journal Current Biology, suggests that the mysterious hominin belonged to an extinct maternal branch of modern humans that might have contributed to the origin of Native Americans.
    The lateral view of the skull unearthed from Red Dear Cave [Credit: Xueping Ji]
    "Ancient DNA technique is a really powerful tool," Su says. "It tells us qu
  • Analysis of fossil tooth brings to light earliest humans from southern Africa

    Analysis of fossil tooth brings to light earliest humans from southern Africa
    Fossil tooth analysis by Southern Cross University geochemist Dr. Renaud Joannes-Boyau has played a central role in an international collaboration that has properly identified the earliest humans.
    Dr Renaud Joannes-Boyau with a Homo Naledi tooth[Credit: Southern Cross University]The new study, published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, demonstrates that among the 23 specimens analyzed and potentially representing early Homo from southern Africa between 2.5 and 1.4
  • Using accurate data when studying Human evolution

    Using accurate data when studying Human evolution
    Uncovering the evolution of any set of living creatures is a complex and highly detailed task for scientists, and theories and approaches that may differ over time may indeed change the fossil record. But paleoanthropologist and Stony Brook University Professor Carrie S. Mongle, Ph.D., and co-authors urge investigators to take caution on their findings. They provide researchers investigating the evolutionary past of ancient hominins (a group including humans and our immediate fossil ancestors)
  • Paleobiology: Complex family relationships

    Paleobiology: Complex family relationships
    An international team of researchers led by LMU paleontologist Bettina Reichenbacher has managed to classify fossils of one of the most species-rich fish groups into a family tree for the first time.
    Rhyacichthys guilberti [Credit: © Philippe Keith]
    Gobies are one of the most species-rich groups of ocean and freshwater fish. Found throughout the world in around 2,300 species divided between eight families, the Gobioidei suborder is highly diverse. Understanding how, why, and when this dive
  • 'Everywhere they dig': looters hunt antiquities in Albania

    'Everywhere they dig': looters hunt antiquities in Albania
    Shards of ceramics litter the fields of an ancient city in southeastern Albania, where looters have raided the area's highlands in search of antiquities to sell to international traffickers.
    Experts say illicit treasure hunters operate with near impunity in Albania[Credit: Gent Shkullaku/AFP]
    Illicit treasure hunters operate with near impunity in the country, stirring outrage among archaeologists over the theft of priceless national heritage that feeds a global black market.
    The government says
  • Entombed together: Rare fossil flower and parasitic wasp make for amber artwork

    Entombed together: Rare fossil flower and parasitic wasp make for amber artwork
    Oregon State University fossil research has revealed an exquisite merger of art and science: a long-stemmed flower of a newly described plant species encased in a 30-million-year-old tomb together with a parasitic wasp.
    Oregon State University fossil research has revealed an exquisite merger of art and science: a long-
    stemmed flower of a newly described plant species encased in a 30-million-year-old tombtogether with a parasitic wasp [Credit: George Poinar Jr., Oregon State University]
    "Based
  • 500-million-year-old fossilized brains of stanleycaris prompt a rethink of the evolution of insects and spider

    500-million-year-old fossilized brains of stanleycaris prompt a rethink of the evolution of insects and spider
    ROM (Royal Ontario Museum) revealed new research based on a cache of fossils that contains the brain and nervous system of a half-billion-year-old marine predator from the Burgess Shale called Stanleycaris. Stanleycaris belonged to an ancient, extinct offshoot of the arthropod evolutionary tree called Radiodonta, distantly related to modern insects and spiders. These findings shed light on the evolution of the arthropod brain, vision, and head structure. The results were announced in the paper,
  • Greater overturning in the Pacific during the Ice Age

    Greater overturning in the Pacific during the Ice Age
    Located between Australia and New Zealand, the Tasman Sea is an important but so far neglected component of the global ocean conveyor belt. Now a new study has discovered evidence that this marginal sea in the South Pacific also played an important role in the exchange of water masses between the large ocean basins during the last ice age. These findings will help to refine climate models and improve our understanding of ocean circulation and carbon storage in the sea, an international team of
  • Medieval pendant with Three Lions unveiled ahead of women’s football final

    Medieval pendant with Three Lions unveiled ahead of women’s football final
    Detectorists uncover 12th century horse harness pendant with England’s heraldic emblemFootball may or may not be coming home to England in Sunday’s Euros 22 final at Wembley, but a new archaeological discovery illustrates quite how long the Three Lions have been cherished in the team’s home country.A tiny medieval pendant, made from copper alloy and featuring the famous heraldic emblem, has come to light after being found late last year by metal detectorists in Wormleighton, Wa
  • Luxurious estate and mosque uncovered in the City of Rahat in the Negev

    Luxurious estate and mosque uncovered in the City of Rahat in the Negev
    A luxurious estate and a rare rural mosque – among the earliest known worldwide (over 1200 years old) were recently discovered in the city of Rahat in the Negev. Large-scale archaeological excavations conducted by the Israel Antiquities Authority to facilitate the construction of a new neighbourhood in Rahat, underwritten by the Authority for Development and Settlement of the Bedouin in the Negev, provide graphic details of the gradual transition from Christianity to Islam that took place
  • Archaeologists carry out first dig at tomb linked to King Arthur

    Archaeologists carry out first dig at tomb linked to King Arthur
    Archaeologists from The University of Manchester have started a dig at a 5,000-year-old tomb linked to King Arthur, hoping to answer some of the mysteries surrounding the enigmatic site in the process.
    Arthur’s Stone [Credit: University of Manchester]
    The experts are working in partnership with English Heritage, which looks after Arthur’s Stone in Herefordshire, to remove turf to expose and record particularly sensitive archaeological remains.
    Arthur’s Stone is a Neolithic cha
  • New finds from the Antikythera shipwreck

    New finds from the Antikythera shipwreck
    The second season of the underwater archaeological research on the Antikythera wreck (May 23-June 15, 2022), within the framework of the 2021-2025 five-year project, yielded rich findings. The research is being conducted by the Swiss School of Archaeology in Greece  under Dr. Angeliki G. Simosi, head of the Ephorate of Antiquities of Euboea, and Lorenz Baumer, Professor of Classical Archeology at the University of Geneva, supervisedby the Ephorate of Underwater Antiquities. The excavation
  • Unlocking the secrets of the ancient coastal Maya

    Unlocking the secrets of the ancient coastal Maya
    Georgia State University anthropologist Dr. Jeffrey Glover grew up in metro Atlanta, but speaking to him, it sounds like his heart is in Quintana Roo. This part of Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula has been the home base for an expansive research project spanning more than 10 years. His research there with Dr. Dominique Rissolo, a maritime archaeologist at UC San Diego's Qualcomm Institute, has uncovered thousands of artifacts that help them shed new light on the ancient Maya people who lived along th
  • Early stone tools were not rocket science

    Early stone tools were not rocket science
    Archaeologically excavated stone tools – some as much as 2.6 million years old – have been hailed as evidence for an early cultural heritage in human evolution. But are these tools proof that our ancestors were already becoming human, both mentally and culturally? 
    One participant of the study—who was naive to stone tools as well as any of their production
     techniques—uses the so-called bipolar technique. The resulting tool is seen centrally
     in the lower
  • New genetic research on remote Pacific islands yields surprising findings on world's earliest seafarers

    New genetic research on remote Pacific islands yields surprising findings on world's earliest seafarers
    New genetic research from remote islands in the Pacific offers fresh insights into the ancestry and culture of the world's earliest seafarers, including family structure, social customs, and the ancestral populations of the people living there today.
    Guam (pictured) was one of the Pacific islands that scientists believe maintained a matrilocal
     population structure some 2,500 to 3,500 years ago [Credit: David Burdick, NOAA]
    The work, described in the journal Science, reveals five previousl
  • Excavations at ancient Galilean synagogue uncover intricate mosaic floor panels dating back nearly 1,600 years

    Excavations at ancient Galilean synagogue uncover intricate mosaic floor panels dating back nearly 1,600 years
    A team of specialists and students led by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill professor Jodi Magness recently returned to Israel’s Lower Galilee to continue unearthing nearly 1,600-year-old mosaics in an ancient Jewish synagogue at Huqoq. Discoveries made this year include the first known depiction of the biblical heroines Deborah and Jael as described in the book of Judges.
    Israelite commander Barak depicted in the Huqoq synagogue mosaic[Credit: Jim Haberman]
    The Huqoq Excavation
  • Human bones used for making pendants in the Stone Age

    Human bones used for making pendants in the Stone Age
    In the Stone Age, pendants with potent symbolism were made from animal teeth and bones, adorning clothes or accessories and serving as rattles. Human bones were also used as a raw material for pendants, as demonstrated by a study where burial finds dating back more than 8,200 years were re-examined after 80 years.
    Grave 69, of an adult male, on the island of Yuzhniy Oleniy Ostrov. Human and animal bone pendants
     were found together with an elk tooth pendant on the femurs. Most likely, they
  • 2000-year-old human remains and animal sacrifices found in Dorset

    2000-year-old human remains and animal sacrifices found in Dorset
    Archaeology students from Bournemouth University have found the remains of prehistoric people and animal sacrifices in a recently discovered Iron Age settlement in Dorset.
    The skeletal remains were found in crouched positions in oval shaped pits[Credit: Bournemouth University]
    The site, which consists of typical Iron Age round houses and storage pits was discovered by archaeology students last September in Winterborne Kingston, Dorset. It dates from around 100 years BC, well before the Roman in
  • Could a Neanderthal meditate?

    Could a Neanderthal meditate?
    Emiliano Bruner, a paleoneurologist at the Centro Nacional de Investigacion sobre la Evolucion Humana (CENIEH), has led a study published in the journal Intelligence on how attention evolved in the human genus, which analyzes the paleontological and archaeological evidence that might shed light on the attentional capacity of extinct hominins.
    Credit: Emiliano Bruner
    This work proposes evolutionary changes in attention associated with the origin of the human genus and in Neanderthals, although o
  • Research into grave goods sheds new light on traditional roles

    Research into grave goods sheds new light on traditional roles
    New archaeological research into grave goods and skeletal material from the oldest grave field in the Netherlands shows that male-female roles 7,000 years ago were less traditional than was thought. The research was conducted by a multidisciplinary team of researchers led by Archol, the National Museum of Antiquities and Leiden University.
    Credit: Leiden University
    New analyses of male-female goods
    A team of chemical analysts, physical anthropologists and archaeologists studied the Elsloo grave
  • Researchers reconstruct the genome of centuries-old E. coli using fragments extracted from an Italian mummy

    Researchers reconstruct the genome of centuries-old E. coli using fragments extracted from an Italian mummy
    An international team led by researchers at McMaster University, working in collaboration with the University of Paris Cite, has identified and reconstructed the first ancient genome of E. coli, using fragments extracted from the gallstone of a 16th century mummy.
    Using pieces of a gallstone from a mummy from the 1500s, researchers have been able to reconstruct
     the E. coli genome [Credit: Division of Paleopathology of the University of Pisa]
    E. coli is a major public health concern, causi
  • Underwater jars reveal Roman period winemaking practices

    Underwater jars reveal Roman period winemaking practices
    Winemaking practices in coastal Italy during the Roman period involved using native grapes for making wine in jars waterproofed with imported tar pitch, according to a study published in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Louise Chassouant of Avignon University and colleagues.
    From the amphorae to understanding the content; this multi-analytical analysis relied on
     archaeobotany and molecular identification [Credit: Louise Chassouant]
    The authors examined three Roman period amphorae -- wi
  • New study shows how the ancient world adapted to climate change

    New study shows how the ancient world adapted to climate change
    A new study of the ancient world of Anatolia—now Turkey—shows how they adapted to climate change but offers a warning for today's climate emergency.
    Maps of the study region: These were created in QGIS using the ASTER Global Digital Elevation
     Model v3 as a basemap [13]: (a) All TIB 8 settlements, with elevation data displayed using a
     topographic color ramp. Important locations are named, ancient (modern) names: Xanthos (Letoon),
     Balboura (Colkayig?), Myra (Demre),
  • Infant burials in Mexico: Aztec customs lasted post-Conquest

    Infant burials in Mexico: Aztec customs lasted post-Conquest
    Four children in Mexico were buried in the years after the Spanish Conquest with rituals and grave offerings that suggest that pre-Hispanic customs lived on for some time after the Aztec empire fell.
    The four infant burials date from 1521 to 1620 [Credit: DSA INAH]
    The National Institute of Anthropology and History said Monday the burials of children ranging from a newborn, to a girl aged between 6 and 8, were found in a working-class district just north of Mexico City’s historic center.

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