• Science Notes – Radiocarbon dating gets a facelift

    Science Notes – Radiocarbon dating gets a facelift
    Every few years, the radiocarbon calibration curve used to determine the calendar dates of almost all 14C measurements gets updated. The last recalibration was in 2013. Called IntCal13, it was based on 7,019 raw data points. This year, a major revamp – one of the biggest since its inception – has taken place and the new IntCal20 now takes into consideration more than 12,900 measurements. As with previous versions, the separate curves for samples from the Southern Hemisphere (SHCal20)
  • From Augustinians to Eboracum at York Guildhall

    From Augustinians to Eboracum at York Guildhall
    With construction work continuing during the lockdown, the York Archaeological Trust (YAT) has remained busy. Since last September, they have been excavating and monitoring the North Annexe area of the city’s Guildhall during redevelopment of the site by VINCI Construction UK.YAT has been busy excavating the northern area of York’s Guildhall. [Image: York Archaeological Trust]
    During the medieval period, this site north of the 14th-century Guildhall was the location of York’s A
  • Murder, monuments, and material wealth uncovered during HS2 works

    Murder, monuments, and material wealth uncovered during HS2 works
    Archaeological work carried out by HS2 archaeologists at Wellwick Farm, Buckinghamshire, has uncovered evidence of activity at the site spanning 4,000 years, from the Neolithic to the medieval period, and including both ceremonial and domestic uses. It is believed that this Iron Age skeleton may represent a victim of either murder or execution. [Image: © HS2 Ltd]Perhaps the most intriguing find was an Iron Age burial believed to represent the victim of a murder or execution. The skeleton of
  • Scipio Africanus’ gravestone

    Scipio Africanus’ gravestone
    Henbury, Bristol
    Damage to statues and other monuments has made for heated headlines and sharply divided opinions this summer. One act seems particularly heinous, however: the deliberate destruction of a grave marker commemorating ‘Scipio Africanus’, an enslaved black teenager who died in Bristol in 1720. We do not know the young man’s birth name (the name on his headstone is that of a Roman general famous for defeating Hannibal in 202 BC, and was presumably given to him by a h
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  • Saving the Mary Rose

    Saving the Mary Rose
    A sample of wood taken from the Mary Rose. [Image: Diamond Light Source]
    Research into the chemical processes that cause wood to degrade over time has uncovered new information vital to the conservation of the wreck of the Mary Rose.Henry VIII’s flagship sank in the Solent on 19 July 1545, where it remained for 400 years until the hull was raised from the seabed in 1982 (see CA 85). The newly salvaged wreck was sprayed with cold water and received a series of polyethylene glycol spray tre
  • Second try at Sant Esteve de Palautordera

    Second try at Sant Esteve de Palautordera
    I have mentioned before now that, by pretty much complete coincidence with my research topic, I have occasional family reasons to pitch up in Catalonia, at a place called Palautordera. Long ago I wrote a post lamenting that the one time I’d been in its apparently-Romanesque church I missed the famous bits; so when I went back again for a family birthday in June 2017, I made sure I visited this time.
    Sant Esteve de Palatordera
    But, this was only slightly more effective than the previous tim
  • Ancient beavers cut trees for food first, not to build dams

    Ancient beavers cut trees for food first, not to build dams
    By studying the wood-cutting behaviour of ancient beavers that once roamed the Canadian high Arctic, an international team of scientists has discovered that tree predation – feeding on trees and harvesting wood – evolved in these now-extinct rodents long before dam-building.Ancient beavers, belonging to the fossil lineage Dipoides, lived four million years ago and were approximately two-thirds
     the size of living Canadian...[[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for
  • Ancient mountains recorded in Antarctic sandstones reveal potential links to global events

    Ancient mountains recorded in Antarctic sandstones reveal potential links to global events
    A new analysis of sandstones from Antarctica indicates there may be important links between the generation of mountain belts and major transitions in Earth's atmosphere and oceans.A team of researchers led by UW Oshkosh geologist Timothy Paulsen analyzed sandstone samples collectedfrom the Transantarctic Mountains [Credit: Timothy Paulsen, University of Wisconsin Oshkosh]A team of researchers analyzed the chemistry of tiny...[[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links
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  • The curious genome of the tuatara, an ancient reptile in peril

    The curious genome of the tuatara, an ancient reptile in peril
    A global team of researchers has partnered up with the Māori tribe Ngātiwai to sequence the genome of the tuatara, a rare reptile endemic to New Zealand. Their work, published in the scientific journal Nature, lays the foundation for understanding the evolution of this ancient species, and can inform conservation efforts to protect it. The study included collaborators at the University of Otago and at EMBL's European Bioinformatics...[[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website
  • When mammals ate dinosaurs

    When mammals ate dinosaurs
    The cervical rib of a long-necked dinosaur from northwest China provides the oldest known evidence to date that early mammals fed on dinosaur meat around 160 million years ago. A research team led by Professor Hans-Ulrich Pfretzschner from the Department of Geosciences at the University of Tübingen discovered bite marks of a mammal the size of a modern shrew on a bone fragment of a sauropod that was approximately 20 meters long and...[[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for f
  • VLBA finds planet orbiting small, cool star

    VLBA finds planet orbiting small, cool star
    Using the supersharp radio "vision" of the National Science Foundation's continent-wide Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA), astronomers have discovered a Saturn-sized planet closely orbiting a small, cool star 35 light-years from Earth. This is the first discovery of an extrasolar planet with a radio telescope using a technique that requires extremely precise measurements of a star's position in the sky, and only the second planet...[[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links
  • Surprisingly dense exoplanet challenges planet formation theories

    Surprisingly dense exoplanet challenges planet formation theories
    New detailed observations with NSF's NOIRLab facilities reveal a young exoplanet, orbiting a young star in the Hyades cluster, that is unusually dense for its size and age. Weighing in at 25 Earth-masses, and slightly smaller than Neptune, this exoplanet's existence is at odds with the predictions of leading planet formation theories.New detailed observations with NSF's NOIRLab facilities reveal a young exoplanet, orbiting a young...[[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full li
  • Surface clean-up technology won't solve ocean plastic problem

    Surface clean-up technology won't solve ocean plastic problem
    Clean-up devices that collect waste from the ocean surface won't solve the plastic pollution problem, a new study shows.Plastic bag in the ocean [Credit: Making Oceans Plastic Free]Researchers compared estimates of current and future plastic waste with the ability of floating clean-up devices to collect it - and found the impact of such devices was "very modest". However, river barriers could be more effective and - though they have...[[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full
  • Stars rich in phosphorus: Seeds of life in the universe

    Stars rich in phosphorus: Seeds of life in the universe
    The journal Nature Communications has published the discovery of a new type of star that is very rich in phosphorus, which could help to explain the origin of phosphorous in our galaxy. This achievement has been made by astronomers of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC) and researchers in computer science from the Centre for Research in Information and Communication Technology (CITIC) at the University of La Coruña...[[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website fo
  • How the seafloor of the Antarctic Ocean is changing - and the climate is following suit

    How the seafloor of the Antarctic Ocean is changing - and the climate is following suit
    The glacial history of the Antarctic is currently one of the most important topics in climate research. Why? Because worsening climate change raises a key question: How did the ice masses of the southern continent react to changes between cold and warm phases in the past, and how will they do so in the future? A team of international experts, led by geophysicists from the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine...[[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for ful
  • Geologists publish new findings on carbonate melts in Earth's mantle

    Geologists publish new findings on carbonate melts in Earth's mantle
    Geologists from Florida State University's Department of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Science have discovered how carbon-rich molten rock in the Earth's upper mantle might affect the movement of seismic waves.Ol Doinyo Lengai volcano in Tanzania, a source of carbonate-rich magma [Credit: Tobias Fischer,University of New Mexico, 2005/National Science Foundation]The new research was coauthored by EOAS Associate Professor of Geology...[[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full lin
  • Between shark and ray: The evolutionary advantage of the sea angels

    Between shark and ray: The evolutionary advantage of the sea angels
    Angel sharks are sharks, but with their peculiarly flat body they rather resemble rays. An international research team led by Faviel A. Lopez-Romero and Jurgen Kriwet of the Institute of Palaeontology has now investigated the origin of this body shape. The results illustrate how these sharks evolved into highly specialised, exclusively bottom-dwelling ambush predators and thus also contribute to a better understanding of their threat...[[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full
  • ALMA captures stirred-up planet factory

    ALMA captures stirred-up planet factory
    Planet-forming environments can be much more complex and chaotic than previously expected. This is evidenced by a new image of the star RU Lup, made with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA).ALMA image of the planet-forming disk around the young star RU Lup. The inset image (lower left, red disk) shows aprevious (DSHARP) observation of the dust disk with rings and gaps that hint at the presence of forming...[[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, ot
  • Excavating the CA archive: Oxfordshire

    Excavating the CA archive: Oxfordshire
    Joe Flatman explores half a century of reports from the past.A selection of articles mentioned by Joe Flatman in this month’s column belowcan be accessed for free for one month via Exact Editions, from 6 August. Use the links within the text to jump to the individual articles, or click on the covers below. Print subscribers can add digital access to their account for just £12 a year – this includes everything from the last 50 years, right back to Issue 1! Call our dedicated sub
  • Clovis type fluted points discovered in Arabia

    Clovis type fluted points discovered in Arabia
    A new study led by archaeologists from the CNRS, the Inrap, the Ohio State University and the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, reports on fluted points from the archaeological sites of Manayzah in Yemen and Ad-Dahariz in Oman. Fluted stone tools are a distinctive, technologically advanced form of projectile points, including spearheads and arrowheads. Fluting is a specific technique that involves the extraction of...[[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for fu
  • Another showcase of my department (as of 2017)

    Another showcase of my department (as of 2017)
    I’ll try to make up for some lost time here by following fast on the last post for once. The next thing I want to record from the memory banks of 2017, after a huge conference in which my department played a small part, is a small one in which we were all of it. The theme for the 2018 International Medieval Congress (which was a huge conference organised from my department, to coincide with the Congress’s 25th birthday, was ‘memory’, and by way of trying to get the depart
  • Heritage from home – August

    Heritage from home – August
    As many heritage sites and museums begin to open their doors again, you may be looking forward to getting back out there, but there is still a huge selection of resources available for the occasions where you would rather get your heritage fix from the comfort of your sofa. Amy Brunskill selects some of the latest ways to get involved in archaeology and heritage at home, as well as giving a summary of some of the sites that you can now visit in person.
    Virtual visitsOne of the advantages of expl
  • Provenancing the stones

    Provenancing the stones
    Mapping the Stonehenge bluestones with mineralogy
    Where did the Stonehenge bluestones come from? Scientific advances are allowing us to pinpoint the outcrops that they were quarried from with ever-greater accuracy. Rob Ixer, Richard Bevins, and Duncan Pirrie describe some of the latest thinking. Rhyolitic and doleritic small bluestones inside the Sarsen Circle of Stonehenge. Left to right are stones SH46-49 and dolerites SH31 and SH32. The Altar Stone, SH80, beneath a fallen sarsen, lies partly
  • Current Archaeology 366 – now on sale

    Current Archaeology 366 – now on sale
    Last summer, we ran a feature about the long-running excavation at Poulton, near Chester, which was then exploring a cemetery associated with a medieval farming community. Within the grave fills, however, the team found far older artefacts: hints of earlier occupation. Now they have revealed the remains of a completely unexpected Iron Age and Romano-British settlement, which is set to transform our understanding of the region during this period.A similarly unexpected find is the focus of our sec
  • How a historian stuffed Hagia Sophia's sound into a studio

    How a historian stuffed Hagia Sophia's sound into a studio
    Turquoise carpets covered the marble floor, with its geometric designs. White drapes concealed the mosaic of the Virgin and Christ. Scaffolding obscured crosses and other Christian symbols.Hagia Sophia, the Byzantine cathedral in Istanbul, Turkey, on Nov. 26, 2011. Hagia Sophia’s rededication
    as a Muslim place of worship, after decades as a museum, threatens to cloak its extravagantly
    reverberant acoustics [Credit: Piotr...[[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links,
  • Byzantine granary found in ancient city of Amorium in central Turkey

    Byzantine granary found in ancient city of Amorium in central Turkey
    A granary containing 11 pithoi filled with wheat and dating back to the ninth-century Byzantine period, was found during excavations in the ancient city of Amorium (Greek Amorion) located under and around the modern village of Hisarkoy, 13 kilometres east of the district centre, Emirdag, Afyonkarahisar Province.Credit: AAAmorium, which was founded in the Hellenistic period, flourished under the Byzantine Empire where it remained an...[[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full l
  • Ancient shell llama offering found in lake Titicaca

    Ancient shell llama offering found in lake Titicaca
    A llama carved from a spondylus shell and a cylindrical laminated gold foil object were the contents of a carved stone box -- an offering -- found at the bottom of Lake Titicaca, according to researchers from Penn State and the Universite libre de Bruxelles, Belgium. The offering, found near an island in the lake, was not located where others had found offerings in the past.Stone box with carved shell llama and rolled gold foil...[[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links
  • United Kingdom returns twelve stolen religious icons to Greece

    United Kingdom returns twelve stolen religious icons to Greece
    A 19th-century religious icon showing the Baptism of Christ and another 11 icons stolen in 2005 from the Church of the Dormition of the Visokos Virgin in Kalouta, in the central Zagori district of Ioannina, have been returned from the United Kingdom.Credit: Greek Ministry of Tourism and CultureAccording to a culture ministry announcement on Tuesday, the 12 icons were returned on July 31, after Greek and UK authorities collaborated...[[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full li
  • Viking waterway through the Orkney Mainland revealed

    Viking waterway through the Orkney Mainland revealed
    New research has revealed a lost Viking waterway running through the Orkney Mainland, connecting the North Atlantic and Scapa Flow, possibly forming the equivalent of an ancient ‘highway’.The lost Viking waterway likely connected farms on Orkney Mainland to the power bases ofthe Norse earls on the north west coast at Birsay [Credit: St Andrews University]The results, to be published in the Journal of Wetland Archaeology, are a...[[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for
  • Scientists discover secret behind Earth's biodiversity hotspots

    Scientists discover secret behind Earth's biodiversity hotspots
    The research suggests that biodiversity hotspots - such as the Daintree Rainforest in Australia and the Cloud Forests of Ecuador - are teeming with species because they have been ecologically stable for long periods of time, allowing evolution to forge ahead undisturbed.A King Protea [Credit: Colin Beale]The findings highlight the threat posed by climate change to some of the most extraordinary places on earth and the importance of...[[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full l
  • Rare malignant cancer diagnosed in a dinosaur

    Rare malignant cancer diagnosed in a dinosaur
    A collaboration led by the Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) and McMaster University has led to the discovery and diagnosis of an aggressive malignant bone cancer—an osteosarcoma—for the first time ever in a dinosaur. No malignant cancers (tumours that can spread throughout the body and have severe health implications) have ever been documented in dinosaurs previously. The paper was published August 3rd in the prestigious medical journal The...[[ This is a content summary only. Visit my web
  • Early Mars was covered in ice sheets, not flowing rivers

    Early Mars was covered in ice sheets, not flowing rivers
    A large number of the valley networks scarring Mars's surface were carved by water melting beneath glacial ice, not by free-flowing rivers as previously thought, according to new UBC research published this week in Nature Geoscience. The findings effectively throw cold water on the dominant "warm and wet ancient Mars" hypothesis, which postulates that rivers, rainfall and oceans once existed on the red planet.UBC researchers have...[[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full lin
  • Can the field of archaeology “pass the spade” to locals to manage cultural heritage?

    Can the field of archaeology “pass the spade” to locals to manage cultural heritage?
    The separation of physical from intellectual work on archaeological sites has persisted throughout the nearly 200 years of archaeological fieldwork in the Middle East, according to Allison Mickel, a professor of anthropology in Lehigh University's Department of Department of Sociology & Anthropology. Mickel, who conducts research on the role local communities have played in archaeological work in the Middle East, says that local...[[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full
  • A giant crane from southern Germany

    A giant crane from southern Germany
    Researchers from Frankfurt and Tubingen say the skull of a very large crane found at the Hammerschmiede fossil site in Allgau, Bavaria, is more than eleven million years old. It is the earliest evidence of such a large crane in Europe, the paleontologists say. The fossil most closely resembles the skull of today's long-beaked Siberian crane, according to Gerald Mayr of the Senckenberg Research Institute, Frankfurt, and Thomas Lechner...[[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full
  • Iron-rich meteorites show record of core crystallization in system's oldest planetesimals

    Iron-rich meteorites show record of core crystallization in system's oldest planetesimals
    New work led by Carnegie's Peng Ni and Anat Shahar uncovers new details about our Solar System's oldest planetary objects, which broke apart in long-ago collisions to form iron-rich meteorites. Their findings reveal that the distinct chemical signatures of these meteorites can be explained by the process of core crystallization in their parent bodies, deepening our understanding of the geochemistry occurring in the Solar System's...[[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full lin
  • London’s earliest playhouse?

    London’s earliest playhouse?
    Excavations in Whitechapel may have uncovered the remains of the first purpose-built Elizabethan playhouse, The Red Lion.Excavating the timber structure believed to be The Red Lion, the first purpose-built Elizabethan playhouse. [Image: Archaeology South-East/UCL]
    The Red Lion playhouse is believed to have been built around 1567 by John Brayne, who later built The Theatre in Shoreditch (see CA 225). It is thought to be the first structure built in the Elizabethan era specifically for the perform
  • All in the family: genetic links in prehistoric Ireland

    All in the family: genetic links in prehistoric Ireland
    A project, headed by researchers from Trinity College Dublin, has sequenced the DNA of more than 40 individuals excavated from both Mesolithic and Neolithic funerary contexts across Ireland. The results (published in Nature: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41586-020-2378-6) illuminate not only the Irish transition to an agrarian way of life but also the social hierarchies that might have formed during this time.A recent study showed that an individual buried in the passage tomb of Newgrange had been bo
  • A trip across the pond some time ago

    A trip across the pond some time ago
    I don’t know about you, but in the current medical and economic climate, I am finding my identity as a researcher quite hard to maintain. As Dirk Gently would have put it, its waveform has collapsed. I have been letting correspondence about research projects and plans drop, just because I can’t see through to a point where they will be practical again, and I was already doing this before the pandemic to be honest. I am also, concomitantly, finding it increasingly hard to engage with
  • Monumental discovery at Durrington Walls

    Monumental discovery at Durrington Walls
    Archaeological investigations 3km from Stonehenge have revealed a series of massive pits possibly representing a late Neolithic circular boundary centred on the Durrington Walls ‘superhenge’.The pits were identified as a series of anomalies in LiDAR and aerial surveys of the area around Durrington Walls. [Image: Stonehenge Hidden Landscapes Project]
    Measuring 10m across and 5m deep, the pits were identified as part of the Stonehenge Hidden Landscapes Project (SHLP), an initiative led
  • Brexit ‘should prompt UK to rethink attitude to Indigenous artefacts’

    Brexit ‘should prompt UK to rethink attitude to Indigenous artefacts’
    Australian repatriation project calls for ‘significant shift’ in approach to returning sacred items
    Britain’s departure from the EU and the renewed focus on empire should prompt a “significant shift” in its approach to returning sacred artefacts to Indigenous communities, the head of an Australian government-funded project has said.More than 33,000 items of Indigenous Australian heritage are held in UK museums, including some believed to have been stolen during or s
  • Spanish police recover ancient treasure from alleged looter

    Spanish police recover ancient treasure from alleged looter
    Metal detectorist had posted images online of artefacts including Phoenician earring Police in Spain have recovered a haul of ancient artefacts, including Phoenician gold jewellery, that could date to 1,200BC, after the metal detectorist who found them posted pictures of the treasures online.The investigation began when specialist officers from the national police force noticed that images of archaeological and cultural items were being shared on different websites. Continue reading...
  • 'Parthenon of shipwrecks': Greece opens its first underwater museum

    'Parthenon of shipwrecks': Greece opens its first underwater museum
    A wreck boasting a trove of fifth-century BC amphorae has been opened to divers off the island of AlonissosGreece has inaugurated its first underwater museum, a trove of fifth-century BC amphorae labelled the “Parthenon of shipwrecks”, off the coast of Alonissos island in the western Aegean.The site of the wreck will be open to tours by certified amateur divers from 3 August to 2 October, while those who can’t dive can follow a virtual reality tour at an information centre in t
  • Take a tusk, drill holes, weave a rope – and change the course of history

    Take a tusk, drill  holes, weave a rope – and change the course of history
    Scientists have discovered the tool our stone-age ancestors used to manufacture twine – a milestone in technological developmentForty thousand years ago, a stone-age toolmaker carved a curious instrument from mammoth tusk. Twenty centimetres long, the ivory strip has four holes drilled in it, each lined with precisely cut spiral incisions.The purpose of this strange device was unclear when it was discovered in Hohle Fels cave in south-western Germany several years ago. It could have been p
  • Inscribed Roman stone monument found in Serbia stolen after 24 hours

    Inscribed Roman stone monument found in Serbia stolen after 24 hours
    The National Museum in Belgrade has reported the theft of a recently discovered Roman stone slab with an engraved text in Latin.Credit: National Museum, BelgradeThis artefact was found on Friday, July 10, 2020, during works on the road leading to the Vinča landfill. One of the workers immediately informed the National Museum in Belgrade about the finding, after which a museum expert arrived at the site the next morning to examine the...[[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for
  • Ancient bronze chariot restored in China's Shaanxi

    Ancient bronze chariot restored in China's Shaanxi
    A bronze chariot, dating from the Western Zhou Dynasty (1046-771 BC), has been restored by cultural-relics protection workers in a project lasting three years, according to the Shaanxi Provincial Institute of Archaeology.The bronze chariot, dating from the Western Zhou Dynasty (1046-771 BC), has been restored by cultural-relics protectionworkers in a project lasting three years, according to the Shaanxi Provincial Institute of...[[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links,
  • Hundreds of arrowheads and crossbow bolts found in Polish forest

    Hundreds of arrowheads and crossbow bolts found in Polish forest
    Hundreds of arrowheads and crossbow bolts thought to have come from Casimir the Great’s 1340 attack on the lands of Galicia which as a result became part of Poland have been discovered in a forest in Sanok.Credit: Historical Museum in SanokKnown as the 'Castle', the stronghold is located on one of the forested peaks of the Słonne Mountains - Biała Góra, part of the Sanok district of Wójtostwo.Until recently, the place was a mystery...[[ This is a content summary onl
  • Italy's Neanderthal caves reveal fluctuations in Mediterranean sea level

    Italy's Neanderthal caves reveal fluctuations in Mediterranean sea level
    The sea level fluctuations in the Tyrrhenian period and the presence of Neanderthal Man in the caves of Circeo and Gaeta: the results of the study provide important indications for the evaluation of the sea level rise caused by global warming.Images of Grotta Guattari, during the collection of samples for the chronostratigraphic study by the
     researchers of the INGV and the Department of History of Tor Vergata...[[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other conte
  • Stolen 9th century Shiva statue returns to India from London

    Stolen 9th century Shiva statue returns to India from London
    For the past few years, the Government of India has been giving renewed impetus to protecting India’s cultural heritage and showcasing it to the world. Among those, retrieval of the 10th century gorgeous idol of ‘Natesh Shiva murti is the most recent triumph.  The ever momentous Shiva murti idol has been repatriated to the Archaeological Survey of India (ASI) on Wednesday.Lord Shiva statue was stolen was stolen in February 1998...[[ This is a content summary only. Visit my websi
  • Gold diadem found in Roman-era sarcophagus in Izmir

    Gold diadem found in Roman-era sarcophagus in Izmir
    A rescue excavation carried out on a construction site in the Alsancak district of the Turkish province of İzmir (Greek Smyrna) after workmen unearthed a stone sarcophagus containing human remains, ceramic fragments and pieces of a gold diadem.Sarcophagus discovered during construction in Izmir[Credit: Andalou Agency](adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});It was determined that the remains date to the 2nd...[[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other
  • Update on the Asclepeion dig at Epidaurus

    Update on the Asclepeion dig at Epidaurus
    Culture Minister Lina Mendoni on Thursday visited the archaeological site at the Epidaurus Asclepeion to be briefed on the progress of recent archaeological excavations which have revealed the remains of an even older temple building found at the shrine, in the vicinity of the Tholos.Credit: Greek Ministry of Culture and SportsThe partially-excavated building, which is dated to about 600 B.C., consists of a ground floor with a...[[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links,

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