• Newscast — Tuesday, July 5, 2022

    Newscast — Tuesday, July 5, 2022
    https://media.ktoo.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/07/20220705-News-Update.wav
    In this newscast:Alaska’s health department splits into two parts;
    Chinook and chum salmon runs are under average in the lower Kuskowim river, but reds are running above average;
    The commercial Dungeness crab fishery in Southeast Alaska will close early because the start of the season has been so slow;
    Alaskans are wrestling with the concept of ranked choice voting;
    Pro-choice supporters crashed the Anchorage Fourt
  • Abortion rights advocates successfully crashed Anchorage’s Independence Day parade

    Abortion rights advocates successfully crashed Anchorage’s Independence Day parade
    Advocates of abortion rights inserted themselves in the Fourth of July parade in downtown Anchorage. (Photo by Liz Ruskin/Alaska Public Media)
    The Fourth of July parade in downtown Anchorage on Monday acquired an unauthorized political element this year when an impromptu contingent of abortion rights advocates decided to march.
    A group of about 20 chanted “Freedom is choice.” Their handmade signs included one saying “My body, my business.”
    Organizers said they lined up wi
  • Alaska Democratic Party director arrested, charged with DUI

    Alaska Democratic Party director arrested, charged with DUI
    The logo of the Alaska Democratic Party is seen in a handout image from the party. (Handout photo)
    Alaska State Troopers arrested Lindsay Kavanaugh, executive director of the Alaska Democratic Party, for allegedly driving while intoxicated over the Fourth of July holiday weekend. Officials with the party confirmed the arrest on Tuesday.
    “I am disappointed that my friend and colleague may have exercised poor judgment while on personal leave and jeopardized the safety of herself and others,&
  • Garden Talk: How to harvest garlic scapes, and some things you can do with them


    Outdoor garden beds with full grown garlic plants. (Photo by Sheli DeLaney/KTOO)https://media.ktoo.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/07/GTALK-S1E12.mp3
    Garlic bulbs planted last fall are now full grown and producing scapes. In this week’s episode of Garden Talk, Ed Buyarski talks about what they are and how to use them.
    “This garlic in front of us was planted last September or October — covered it over with plastic for the winter and rested till it starts to grow roots, just like tul
  • Advertisement

  • Garden Talk: Harvesting garlic scapes


    Outdoor garden beds with full grown garlic plants. (Photo by Sheli DeLaney/KTOO)https://media.ktoo.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/07/GTALK-S1E12.mp3
    Garlic bulbs planted last fall are now full grown and producing scapes. In this week’s episode of Garden Talk, Ed Buyarski talks about what they are and how to use them.
    “This garlic in front of us was planted last September or October — covered it over with plastic for the winter and rested till it starts to grow roots, just like tul
  • Alaska won’t see changes after Supreme Court decision on state powers to prosecute crimes on tribal land


    The U.S. Supreme Court building in Washington, D.C. (Photo by Liz Ruskin/Alaska Public Media)
    Going against decades of precedent in law on Native American sovereignty, the U.S. Supreme Court last week ruled in an Oklahoma case that states can prosecute non-Native people for crimes against Native people that occur on tribal land.
    Alaska, like some 20 other states, already has federal approval from Congress granting such authority, so the decision itself won’t have much impact in Alaska
  • Health officials say you won’t feel a thing as the state’s largest agency splits in two

    Health officials say you won’t feel a thing as the state’s largest agency splits in two
    Adam Crum, commissioner of the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, listens as Gov. Mike Dunleavy speaks on March 21, 2022 about the plan to divide the agency into two smaller departments. (Screen capture of Dunleavy livestream)
    The state’s Department of Health and Social Services — by far the largest state agency — has split into two smaller departments, effective last Friday. State officials say the reorganization will result in two more wieldy departments.
    &ldquo
  • Neglected and forgotten: Volunteers work to restore Native gravesites in Juneau

    Neglected and forgotten: Volunteers work to restore Native gravesites in Juneau
    Jamiann S’eiltin Hasselquist sprays water on a gravestone in a neglected cemetery near Lawson Creek on Douglas Island, Juneau, on June 17, 2022. Hasselquist and other volunteers have been working for over a year unearthing and restoring gravesites in the area. (Photo by Lisa Phu/Alaska Beacon)
    Jamiann S’eiltin Hasselquist plays a song from her phone at a gravesite near Lawson Creek on Douglas Island in Juneau. She rests the phone down on the ground.
    “It was a T’aaḵu
  • Advertisement

  • Election deniers are spreading misinformation nationwide. Here are 4 things to know

    Election deniers are spreading misinformation nationwide. Here are 4 things to know
    NPR used social media and news reports to track four key men spreading misinformation about the 2020 election (from left to right): MyPillow CEO and longtime Trump supporter Mike Lindell, former high school math and science teacher Douglas Frank, former law professor David Clements, and former U.S. Army Captain Seth Keshel. (Photos by Chet Strange/Getty Images; David Carson/St. Louis Post-Dispatch via AP; Jonathan Drake and Brian Snyder/Reuters)
    While the House select committee carefully lays ou
  • Wildfire activity escalates in Alaska with 20 new fires Monday

    Wildfire activity escalates in Alaska with 20 new fires Monday
    Wildfires burning south of Lime Village in July, 2022. (Photo by Gannett Glacier’s Bryan Quimby/Alaska Incident Management Team)
    Wildfire activity continues to escalate in Alaska as the state logged more than 20 new fires Monday, raising the number of active fires to 214. Thousands of lightning strikes were again detected across a wide area, from South Central to the Interior and Northern Alaska. 
    Among lighting-caused fires that started Monday were two in the Delta Junction area. Sta
  • Southeast’s Dungeness crab fishery to close early after slow start

    Southeast’s Dungeness crab fishery to close early after slow start
    Vera Goudima and Hilary Wood sample Dungeness Crab for the Alaska Department of Fish and Game in Petersburg. (Photo courtesy of ADFG)
    The commercial Dungeness crab fishery in Southeast Alaska will close two weeks early this summer because the start of the season has been so slow.
    In recent years, Dungeness crabbing has been pretty great for commercial fishermen in Southeast. The harvests and prices have been above average, sometimes way above. Last year saw the second highest harvest on rec
  • EPA extends comment period on watershed protections that would block Pebble Mine

    EPA extends comment period on watershed protections that would block Pebble Mine
    Residents flew in from around the Bristol Bay region to give public comment on the EPA’s proposed determination. (Photo by Corinne Smith/KDLG)
    The Environmental Protection Agency announced last week that it is extending its comment period for proposed restrictions on mining of the Pebble deposit. The comment period was originally set to end in July. Now it will continue for two more months, to Sept. 6.
    Representatives with the EPA visited Dillingham and Newhalen earlier this month to hear
  • A small community of Spruce Island monks is getting a new chapel

    A small community of Spruce Island monks is getting a new chapel
    Monks and volunteers carry the dome that is now installed on the top of Spruce Island’s newest chapel. (Photo courtesy of Father Andrew)
    The village of Ouzinkie on Spruce Island has an Orthodox church, and the far side of the island also has its own chapel over the grave site of St. Herman. But the three monks who live in the middle part of the island only have a small indoor chapel in their shared house.
    Father Andrew is the superior of the monks living on Spruce Island. He said that even
  • Douglas soapbox derby on St. Anns Avenue: It all goes downhill from there.


    https://media.ktoo.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/07/07-01-22-Juneau-Afternoon-2-Soapbox.mp3Guests: David Eckerson, Derby organizer. Contestants: Arrow and Ona Eckerson and Grayson Chapman.Arrow Erickson tests out the ramp set up for the Douglas soap box derby (Photo by Rhonda McBride).
    David Erickson began organizing the Douglas Soapbox Challenge two years ago and says he’s still learning about the how to put this event on. “I love the excitement of just watching the kids, when they ge
  • Douglas July 4th deep pit barbecue.


    The beef for the BBQ is cooked overnight (Photo courtesy of the Douglas United Community Methodist Church).
    https://media.ktoo.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/07/07-01-22-Juneau-Afternoon-3-BBQ.mp3Guests: Debra Gerrish and Claudette Curtis, Douglas Community Methodist Church 
    Claudette Curtis, 87, has been a member of the Douglas Community Methodist Church for about 40 years. On Juneau Afternoon, she talked about how the proceeds from the church’s July 4th barbecue are used to feed childr
  • Douglas July 4th Committee plans three days of family fun.


    Maggie Smith and Sharon Kelly tell volunteer host Andy Kline what the Douglas July 4th Committee has in the works this year.https://media.ktoo.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/07/0701-Juneau-Afternoon-1-Douglas4th.mp3Guests: Maggie Swanson and Sharon Kelly, Douglas July 4th Committee.
     
    Maggie Swanson and Sharon Kelly, volunteers on the Douglas July 4th Committee (Photo by Rhonda McBride).
     
    The Douglas July 4th Committee spends the whole year working with volunteers to plan a holiday weeke
  • Through the lens of Jonathan Swinton: Juneau in monochrome.


    https://media.ktoo.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/07/07-01-22-Juneau-Afternoon-4-Swinton.mp3Guests: Jonathan Swinton, photographer. 
    Coghlan Island, photographed by Jonathan Swinton.
     
    Jonathan Swinton has a book featuring photographs of Treadwell Mine ruins.
    Jonathan Swinton is a family therapist — but ever since he was a teenager, photography has been a passion.
    Today, he prefers to shoot images in black and white, a holdover from his younger days spent in the darkroom.
    Swinton sa
  • Ecologists say federal wildfire plans are dangerously out of step with climate change

    Ecologists say federal wildfire plans are dangerously out of step with climate change
    A scorched structure and vehicles stand on a property mostly destroyed by the Hermits Peak/Calf Canyon Fire on June 2, near Las Vegas, N.M. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
    The federal Government Accountability Office (GAO) is launching an investigation after U.S. Forest Service-controlled burns that escaped caused the largest wildfire ever recorded in New Mexico.
    The GAO is examining controlled burn policies at the Forest Service and other federal land agencies.
    On May 20, USFS Chief Randy Mo
  • Newscast — Friday, July 1, 2022

    Newscast — Friday, July 1, 2022
    https://media.ktoo.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/07/20220701-News-Update-1.wav
    In this newscast:Juneau’s 4th of July fireworks will go off despite supply chain issues;
    Filipino dance groups are making a comeback in Juneau;
    Juneau School District’s Board of Education held a special meeting to discuss a third-party investigation into what’s being called the “floor-sealant incident.”
  • Juneau school district moves toward hiring third party for floor sealant investigation

    Juneau school district moves toward hiring third party for floor sealant investigation
    Sít’ Eetí Shaanáx Glacier Valley School on June 14, 2022. (Photo by Paige Sparks/KTOO)
    The Juneau School District Board of Education held a special meeting Thursday night to discuss a third party investigation into what’s now being called the “floor sealant incident” — that’s when 12 students at Sitʼ Eeti Shaanáx̱ Glacier Valley Elementary School were given sealant instead of milk to drink at breakfast in mid-June.
    City an
  • Health officials see high demand for youth COVID vaccine in Juneau

    Health officials see high demand for youth COVID vaccine in Juneau
    A 9-year-old gets a flu shot after getting her COVID-19 vaccine on Thursday, Nov. 11, 2021, at Riverbend Elementary School in Juneau, Alaska. (Photo by Rashah McChesney/KTOO)
    Juneau Public Health began administering vaccines to young children under 5 years old last week. So far, 24 of Juneau’s youngest eligible population have gotten the shot.
    “We’ve been booked! They filled up really quickly,” said Public Health Nurse Alison Gottschlich. She says the clinic usually only
  • Despite supply chain issues, Juneau’s Fourth of July fireworks show is a go

    Despite supply chain issues, Juneau’s Fourth of July fireworks show is a go
    A customer watches a demonstration at Smoke Signals Fireworks on Douglas Island on Thursday. (Photo by Jeremy Hsieh/KTOO)
    Juneau’s Fourth of July festivities and fireworks are set for the holiday weekend. But because of supply chain issues, the volunteers who put together the annual fireworks show in Gastineau Channel weren’t even sure they’d get the fireworks in time.
    The show’s licensed pyrotechnician, Sigrid Dahlberg, wants to assure Juneau that the show will go on the
  • A pilot shortage that’s been brewing for years adds to the summer travel chaos

    A pilot shortage that’s been brewing for years adds to the summer travel chaos
    The number of new pilots entering the industry is below the demand. (Photo by Nelson Almeida/AFP via Getty Images)
    High gas prices. Bad weather. Too many people traveling.
    Those are some of the factors causing travel chaos this summer, but a shortage of pilots that has been brewing for years has also added strain to the industry.
    “The problem at airlines is, when you’re short on ramp staff, when you’re short on ops agents, it just delays flights,” Captain Casey Murray, pr
  • Anchorage bird rescue keeps going amid worst avian flu in years

    Anchorage bird rescue keeps going amid worst avian flu in years
    Bird TLC veterinarian Dr. Karen Higgs opens a bird flu testing kit in the center’s garage. Staff set up a tent away from other birds where they can examine those with bird flu symptoms. (Photo by Katie Anastas/Alaska Public Media)
    The Bird Treatment and Learning Center in Anchorage is one of a few bird rehabilitation centers in the state still accepting birds as the avian flu circulates.
    Now, along with eagles with broken wings and orphaned baby ducks, the center — often called Bird
  • US Supreme Court limits historic McGirt ruling

    US Supreme Court limits historic McGirt ruling
    The U.S. Supreme Court building in Washington, D.C. (Photo by Liz Ruskin/Alaska Public Media)
    The United States Supreme Court has limited the scope of its historic McGirt decision.
    In a 5-4 vote, the high court ruled in Oklahoma v. Castro-Huerta that the state of Oklahoma has concurrent jurisdiction and the ability to prosecute non-Natives when the victim is Native and the crime is committed on tribal land.
    “From start to finish, the dissent employs extraordinary rhetor
  • When the temperature hits 70, Alaskans feel the heat — and start suffering health ills

    When the temperature hits 70, Alaskans feel the heat — and start suffering health ills
    Anchorage residents swim and lounge at Goose Lake to beat the afternoon heat on June 30. A soon-to-be-published study details how summer heat can cause medical emergencies for Alaskans. (Photo by Yereth Rosen/Alaska Beacon)
    Alaskans’ health starts suffering when temperatures climb to 70 degrees, and local and state officials should consider policies to respond to heat-related health problems that are expected to increase as the climate continues to warm, according to new research
  • Blood quantum requirement dropped for Sealaska Corporation enrollment

    Blood quantum requirement dropped for Sealaska Corporation enrollment
    A Sealaska corporate logo adorns the roof of the Southeast Alaska Native corporation’s headquarters in Juneau on May 2, 2018. (Photo by Jeremy Hsieh/KTOO)
    Sealaska Corporation shareholders have voted to get rid of the blood quantum requirement for enrollment. The vote was tallied at the annual shareholders meeting in Juneau on June 25. CoastAlaska’s Angela Denning reports:
    The change means descendants of original shareholders no longer need to prove they have one–quarter Native
  • Juneau group says it has enough signatures to get real estate disclosure repeal on ballot

    Juneau group says it has enough signatures to get real estate disclosure repeal on ballot
    A sign marks a home that sold recently along North Douglas Highway in Juneau on June 30, 2022. City ordinances mandate the buyer disclose the sale price to city assessor’s office, though a group supported by the real estate industry wants to repeal those ordinances. (Photo by Jeremy Hsieh/KTOO)
    The group that wants to do away with Juneau’s mandate to share real estate sale prices says it has turned in enough signatures to get the question in front of local voters in the fall.
    The gro
  • Friday, July 1, 2022: Douglas July 4th extravaganza. Jonathan Swinton featured at Juneau Artists Gallery. 

    Friday, July 1, 2022: Douglas July 4th extravaganza. Jonathan Swinton featured at Juneau Artists Gallery. 
    From parades – to fireworks -- to barbeques and watermelon eating contests, there’s no shortage of homegrown fun over in Douglas. On Friday's Juneau Afternoon, a complete round-up of events -- and a visit with some serious soapbox derby competitors. What it takes to cross the finish line. Also, in this program: Why Jonathan Swinton…
  • Thursday, June 30, 2022: Lori Colbert and Rex Butler weigh in on Justice Ketanji Brown Jackson.

    Thursday, June 30, 2022: Lori Colbert and Rex Butler weigh in on Justice Ketanji Brown Jackson.
    By some estimates, out of more than 2,000 practicing attorneys in Alaska, only about twenty are Black. Only a fraction of the judges in the state are African American. Given those numbers, it’s easy to understand why June 30, 2022 was a milestone for two longtime cAnchorage attorneys, who are Black and often represent people…https://media.ktoo.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/06/06-30-22-Juneau-Afternoon-1-Supreme-Court.mp3Part 1: Reaction to Justice Ketanji Brown Jackson's swearing-in:
  • Reaction to Justice Ketanji Brown Jackson’s swearing-in: A historic breakthrough.


    https://media.ktoo.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/06/06-30-22-Juneau-Afternoon-1-Supreme-Court.mp3Guests: Lori Colbert, family law attorney. Rex Butler, defense attorney.Lori Colbert’s practice in Anchorage focuses on family law. She is active in both the Alaska and American Bar Association.
    Rex Butler is a criminal defense attorney. He founded his Anchorage law practice in 1985.
     
    Although Rex Butler and Lori Colbert have worked for many years to bring diversity and equity to Alaska&rsq
  • Juneau July 4th weekend weather outlook


    https://media.ktoo.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/06/06-20-22-Juneau-Afternoon-3-Weather.mp3Guests: Wes Adkins, meteorologist, Juneau National Weather Service forecast team.
      
    Wes Adkins, one of the lead forecasters on the Juneau National Weather Service team, says the July 4th weekend will bring mostly hot and dry weather, but there is an outside chance of thunderstorms and flooding from melting snow on the Taku River.
     
  • A conversation about friendship and race continues.


    https://media.ktoo.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/06/06-30-22-Juneau-Afternoon-2-BAA.mp3Guests: Heather Pederson, one of Kelli Patterson’s best friends.Heather Pedersen and Kelli Patterson met on the job a few years ago, when they discovered they have a lot in common.
    It was an intimate discussion between two friends that began on the radio, not long after George Floyd was murdered. Heather Pedersen, who is white, worried about how the social upheaval from this tragedy would affect her black
  • Newscast – Thursday, June 30, 2022


    https://media.ktoo.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/06/KTOO-UPDATE-2022-06-30.mp3
    In this newscast: Fire management agencies raise Alaska’s wildfire-fighting preparedness level to its highest tier
    Anchorage authorities shut down the makeshift homeless shelter in the Sullivan Arena after two years
    Opponents of mandatory real estate sales price disclosures in Juneau turn in more than 500 more signatures for their repeal effort
    State authorities report 172 cases of COVID-19 in Juneau last we
  • As state COVID emergency ends, tens of thousands of Alaskans will see reduced food stamp benefits

    As state COVID emergency ends, tens of thousands of Alaskans will see reduced food stamp benefits
    Shelves at a small Anchorage-area grocery store on Wednesday, Jan. 5, 2022. (Photo by Emily Mesner/ADN)
    Tens of thousands of Alaskans will lose access to expanded food stamp benefits in September after the state ends its public health emergency in July.
    The end of certain additional benefits under the federal Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program comes as food aid groups say need is reaching previous pandemic highs while prices are soaring. Plus, other pandemic-era benefits, like t
  • Filipino dance makes a comeback in Juneau

    Filipino dance makes a comeback in Juneau
    Ell Pecson tries out tinikling at the Zach Gordon Youth Center in Juneau on June 29, 2022. (Photo by Paige Sparks/KTOO)
    Filipino dance groups used to be a big deal in Juneau. There were multiple troupes who practiced regularly and performed at the Filipino Community Hall. They even danced at high school basketball games. But that was 15 years ago.
    Participation waned over the years, but David Abad, who grew up in Juneau’s Filipino community, wants to revive it. So he set up a workshop at J
  • In Sitka, more cats than you’d expect have more toes than you’d expect

    In Sitka, more cats than you’d expect have more toes than you’d expect
    Alice picking up a blueberry with her “hand.” (Photo courtesy of Anna Laffrey)
    Like many rural communities, Sitka struggles to keep up with its feral cat population. But because of the island’s limited genetic diversity, an interesting genetic mutation has made its way into the feline gene pool.
    Two years ago, Anna Laffrey was out for a walk on the Sitka Cross Trail when she stumbled on something unexpected.
    “I literally thought that I saw a three-headed cat,” Laffr
  • Peltola’s superpower: US House nominee disarms with niceness

    Peltola’s superpower: US House nominee disarms with niceness
    U.S. House candidate Mary Peltola discusses new ideas with her campaign team at a downtown Anchorage coffee shop on Wednesday. (Photo by Matt Faubion/Alaska Public Media)
    One of the nominees in the special U.S. House is famous worldwide. Another bears the name of a former Alaska congressman and has a former U.S. senator for an uncle.
    Then there’s Democrat Mary Peltola.
    She surprised a lot of political observers with a fourth-place finish in the June primary, high enough to put her name on
  • EPA fines Air Force for mismanaging hazardous waste on Shemya

    EPA fines Air Force for mismanaging hazardous waste on Shemya
    The COBRA DANE radar at Eareckson Air Station on Shemya Island. The U.S. military began activities on Shemya during World War II. In the 1990s, the Air Force built a more modern station and has maintained a presence there since. (Photo by Chief Petty Officer Brandon Rail/Alaskan NORAD Region, Alaskan Com.)
    The United States Air Force has agreed to pay more than $200,000 in fines for mismanaging hazardous waste on Shemya Island in the far Western Aleutians. Shemya is about 500 miles from mainland
  • State health officials stress importance of vaccinating youngest Alaskans against COVID

    State health officials stress importance of vaccinating youngest Alaskans against COVID
    A child gets a kiss from her dad after getting her COVID-19 vaccine during a pediatric clinic at Riverbend Elementary School in Juneau, Alaska. (Photo by Rashah McChesney/KTOO)
    Children under 5 years old began getting COVID-19 vaccines in Alaska last week.
    In a health presentation to parents Tuesday night, state health officials stressed the importance of getting kids vaccinated and addressed common concerns. Alaska’s chief medical officer, Dr. Anne Zink, said COVID-19 vaccines for the you
  • Supreme Court restricts the EPA’s authority to mandate carbon emissions reductions

    Supreme Court restricts the EPA’s authority to mandate carbon emissions reductions
    The U.S. Supreme Court curbed the EPA’s ability to fight climate change. (Photo by Al Drago/Getty Images)
    The U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday dealt a major blow to the Environmental Protection Agency’s power to regulate carbon emissions that cause climate change. The decision by the conservative court majority sets the stage for further limitations on the regulatory power of other agencies as well.
    By a vote of 6 to 3, the court said that any time an agency does something big and new
  • Newscast – Wednesday, June 29, 2022

    Newscast – Wednesday, June 29, 2022
    https://media.ktoo.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/06/ktoo-update-2022-06-29.mp3
    In this newscast:Health authorities share what the science says about the risks and benefits of COVID-19 vaccines for young children
    The State Division of Elections addresses why so many ballots were rejected in the recent special primary election
    Former President Donald Trump plans to come to Alaska and hold a rally for Republican candidates on July 9
    Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson will host a new Arctic security stu
  • Garden Talk: June 29, 2022


    In this week’s episode, Ed Buyarski talks about the best practices for watering your plants during this long hot and dry spell.https://media.ktoo.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/06/gtalk-6-29-22.mp3
    If you have questions for Garden Talk, email [email protected] or call 907-209-8905.
     
     
     
  • Juneau-Douglas City Museum: Remembering the Legacy of Carolyn Jensen.


    https://media.ktoo.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/06/jensen-olson-6-29-22.mp3Guests: Elissa Borges, Curator of Public Programs, City Museum. Ginger Hudson, Jensen-Olson Arboretum Manager.
    Carolyn Jensen at 19 (Photo courtesy of the Friends of the Jensen-Olson Arboretum).
    “We’re not talking about religious joys, though many gardeners are devout believers. We’re thinking of the deep and subtle sense of connectedness to the seasons… the miracle of a sprouting plant… the
  • July’s First Friday events


    https://media.ktoo.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/06/jahc-6-29-22.mp3Guests: Kathleen Harper, Juneau Arts and Humanities Council.
    The Juneau Arts and Humanities Council is hosting a July First Friday reception for the opening of  “Ridge Line,” a solo exhibition by Kelsey Hoke, a painter known for her scenic terrain and vibrant colors.
  • Friends and colleagues remember Dennis Egan: ‘the best curmudgeon around’

    Friends and colleagues remember Dennis Egan: ‘the best curmudgeon around’
    Sen. Dennis Egan, center, chats with his legislative staffers Sorcha Hazelton, left, and Peter Naoroz, right, and former staffer Jesse Kiehl, far right, at the Juneau Moose Lodge on May 31, 2018. He was there to speak to the Juneau Chamber of Commerce in one of his last public engagements before retiring from public office. (Photo by Jeremy Hsieh/KTOO)
    Alaska Sen. Jesse Kiehl does a pretty good impression of one of his old boss’s signature lines.
    “Oh GOD, it’s YOU,” Kiehl
  • Trump announces Anchorage rally in support of Dunleavy, Palin and Tshibaka

    Trump announces Anchorage rally in support of Dunleavy, Palin and Tshibaka
    Former President Donald Trump speaks to service members at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, Feb. 28, 2019. Trump was at the base to meet with service members after returning from a summit in Hanoi, Vietnam. (Public domain photo by Staff Sgt. Westin Warburton/U.S. Air Force)
    Former President Donald Trump is coming to Alaska to campaign for three Republican candidates running for statewide office.
    The visit was announced in a statement Wednesday from Save America, a political action group
  • Witness signature requirement leads to high ballot rejection rate, especially in rural Alaska

    Witness signature requirement leads to high ballot rejection rate, especially in rural Alaska
    Bethel residents vote during Election Day in 2020. That year, a Superior Court ruled the witness signature requirement was unconstitutional due to the pandemic making it difficult for people to gather.(Photo by Katie Basile/KYUK)
    More than 7,500 ballots were rejected in the special election to fill the remainder of the late Congressman Don Young’s term, according to the final vote tally. 
    That’s a statewide rejection rate of 4.55%, double the rejection rate from the 2020 primary
  • Frustrations grow along Yukon River as salmon fishing remains closed for second year amid record low runs

    Frustrations grow along Yukon River as salmon fishing remains closed for second year amid record low runs
    Boats along the Andreafsky River are packed and ready if evacuation orders come through in St. Mary’s. (Photo by Katie Basile/For KYUK)
    It’s a grim outlook for Yukon River Chinook and summer chum salmon.
    Chinook salmon counts are the lowest ever recorded at this point in the season, and state and federal fishery managers do not expect them to meet escapement goals. The low numbers are also making it difficult for biologists to determine if the run is late.
    The summer chum run looks s
  • Sitka’s Search and Rescue team rescues hiker after fall from footbridge

    Sitka’s Search and Rescue team rescues hiker after fall from footbridge
    Sitka Trail Works, on Friday, published this photo of the bridge where the hiker fell along Indian River Trail (Kaasda Héen) with a warning to use caution when hiking the trail, as the rest of the railing may not be structurally sound (Photo courtesy of Lee House/Sitka Trail Works)
    Sitka’s Search and Rescue team rescued an injured hiker on the evening of June 23 after he fell while hiking the Indian River Trail (Kaasda Héen).
    According to Assistant Fire Chief David Johnson, 9

Follow @AnchorageNewsUS on Twitter!