• Juneau’s PJ Foy takes a shot at Team USA at Olympic Trials

    Juneau’s PJ Foy takes a shot at Team USA at Olympic Trials
    PJ Foy competes at the Alaska Swimming State Championships in April, 2023. (Photo/Kevin Tuning)
    Recent Juneau high school graduate and soon-to-be collegiate swimmer PJ Foy competed in the U.S. Olympic trials in Indianapolis on Friday.
    The Thunder Mountain High School alumni competed in the men’s 100-meter butterfly alongside some of the best swimmers in the country. He finished 49 out of more than 60 swimmers. That means he won’t compete for Team USA in the Paris games. But, he
  • Newscast – Monday, June 24, 2024

    Newscast – Monday, June 24, 2024
    https://media.ktoo.org/wp-content/uploads/2024/06/20240624-News-Update.mp3
    In this newscast:A Wisconsin museum has sent a Chilkat robe it’s had for the last 80 years to Sealaska Heritage Institute in Juneau in the hopes of identifying it,
    The Kodiak Filipino American Association celebrated Philippine Independence Day wiht a basketball tournament,
    Tongass Voices: Juneau Bike Doctor’s Ken Hill wants to get everybody on a bike
  • Tongass Voices: Juneau Bike Doctor’s Ken Hill wants to get everybody on a bike


    Juneau Bike Doctor owner Ken Hill with a bike that will be donated to a student in need of a bike at Dzantik’i Heeni Middle School. Artist Chloey Cavanaugh and school librarian Luke Fortier painted herrings on the sides in support of the Herring Protectors movement. June 21, 2024. (Photo by Yvonne Krumrey/KTOO)
    This is Tongass Voices, a series from KTOO sharing weekly perspectives from the homelands of the Áak’w Kwáan and beyond.
    Ken Hill opened Juneau Bike Doctor
  • A Chilkat robe returns to Southeast Alaska, but SHI needs help identifying it


    Sealaska Heritage Institute Director of Archives and Collections Emily Galgano shows the back of a Chilkat robe on loan from the Rahr-West Museum in Wisconsin. June 20, 2024. (Yvonne Krumrey/KTOO)https://media.ktoo.org/wp-content/uploads/2024/06/21robe.mp3
    In the basement of the Walter Soboleff building on a recent afternoon, Emily Galgano opened a huge white cabinet. She pulled out a long drawer with a Chilkat robe laying inside. The robe’s colors are faded. 
    “So it could be ve
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  • Lightning sparks wildfires across Interior Alaska

    Lightning sparks wildfires across Interior Alaska
    A map generated by AirNow.gov shows recent wildfires around the state and the smoke that they generate. (From Airnow.gov)
    Wildfire activity ramped over the weekend due to hot, dry conditions and numerous lightning strikes, including over 6,500 Sunday.
    “Sunday is definitely our largest amount of lightning for one day this season,” said Sam Harrel, a spokesman for the Alaska Division of Forestry.
    Harrel said even prior to Sunday’s lighting, earlier strikes resulted in numerous st
  • Alaska ‘data bike’ proposal aims to reform how DOT assesses its sidewalks and trails

    Alaska ‘data bike’ proposal aims to reform how DOT assesses its sidewalks and trails
    In Idaho, Boise’s metropolitan transportation planning organization uses this “data bike” to help assess the condition of its active transportation network. The Alaska Department of Transportation is seeking grant funding to start a similar program. (Courtesy of Community Planning Association of Southwest Idaho)
    Right now, condition reports about Alaska’s state-owned sidewalks, bike paths and boardwalks are entirely anecdotal.
    And that makes Julius Adolfsson’s job d
  • U.S. is ‘flying blind’ with bird flu, repeating mistakes of COVID, health experts say

    U.S. is ‘flying blind’ with bird flu, repeating mistakes of COVID, health experts say
    During COVID, shortages of tests led to backlogs in getting tested. Experts worry that the U.S. hasn’t learned from those mistakes and wouldn’t be prepared for a major bird flu outbreak. (Rebecca Blackwell/AP/AP)
    It’s been nearly three months since the U.S. government announced an outbreak of the bird flu virus on dairy farms. The World Health Organization considers the virus a public health concern because of its potential to cause a pandemic, yet the U.S. has tested only abou
  • Alaska foster families get another year of fully funded child care

    Alaska foster families get another year of fully funded child care
    Children’s coats hang in a hallway at Hillcrest Childcare Center in Anchorage on April 18, 2024. (Photo by Claire Stremple/Alaska Beacon)
    State officials have alerted foster parents that Alaska health and community services agencies will take over the costs of a federal program that fully funds their child care after the pandemic-era money ends in July.
    The news is a boon to the foster system, which foster families and child care providers say has struggled to find families that can afford
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  • Sullivan amendment to defense bill would revive Ambler Road

    Sullivan amendment to defense bill would revive Ambler Road
    Aerial view of Ambler and the Kobuk River in the summer. (National Park Service)
    U.S. Sen. Dan Sullivan said he’s added an amendment to an annual defense bill that would override the Biden administration’s rejection of the Ambler Road.
    In a press release, Sullivan said the amendment requires the Interior Department to “select a viable path for the project across public land.”
    The proposed Ambler Road would run more than 200 miles. It would start west of the Dalton Highway
  • Newscast – Friday, June 21, 2024

    Newscast – Friday, June 21, 2024
    https://media.ktoo.org/wp-content/uploads/2024/06/20240621-Newsupdate.mp3
    In this newscast:The Alaska Department of Fish and Game has announced an emergency closure for most near-shore fishing areas around Juneau,
    Researchers found dangerous levels of paralytic shellfish toxins in Ketchikan, and they are helping researchers learn more about the toxins,
    And, if you felt that this May was especially rainy, you were right
  • Juneau Afternoon: Buddy Tabor Project updates, a life in tourism with Bob Janes, and Perseverance Theatre’s STAR program

    Juneau Afternoon: Buddy Tabor Project updates, a life in tourism with Bob Janes, and Perseverance Theatre’s STAR program
    Friday, June 21, 2024 — Full EpisodeOn today’s program:New album releases from the Buddy Tabor ProjectA life in guiding and tourism with Bob Janes and Amy BalagnaPerseverance Theatre STAR Program
    Volunteer Andy Kline hosts the conversation. Juneau Afternoon airs at 3:00 p.m. on KTOO and KAUK with a rebroadcast at 7:00 p.m. Listen online or subscribe to the podcast at ktoo.org/juneauafternoon.Subscribe to the podcast:Apple PodcastsNPR OneSpotifyStitcherRSSJuneau Afternoon is a pr
  • Much of Juneau’s king salmon fishery will close this summer, because of a 2020 landslide

    Much of Juneau’s king salmon fishery will close this summer, because of a 2020 landslide
    Salmon fills a tote in Juneau in August 2022. (Clarise Larson/for the Juneau Empire)
    Sport fishermen in Juneau may be disappointed come Monday, because king salmon will largely be off limits this summer. The Alaska Department of Fish and Game has announced an emergency closure for most near-shore fishing areas around Juneau.
    The boundaries of the hatchery king salmon closure near Juneau. (Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Division of Sport Fish)
    Douglas Island Pink and Chum, or DIPAC’s e
  • Garden Talk: The solstice marks an important milestone in the growing season

    Garden Talk: The solstice marks an important milestone in the growing season
    Fresh weeds (left to right: horsetail, buttercup and chickweed) that have been soaked for two weeks. Buyarski says this makes a smelly, brown soup that can be diluted and used to feed plants. (Ed Buyarski)
    Yesterday was Summer Solstice. In Alaska, it can feel like a relief to begin losing daylight again — especially for this Morning Edition host, who’s been struggling to get enough sleep. But the solstice also marks an important milestone in the growing season.This week, I spoke with
  • The director of Juneau’s Glory Hall homeless shelter is stepping down after 15 years

    The director of Juneau’s Glory Hall homeless shelter is stepping down after 15 years
    Mariya Lovishchuk and her dog inside 247 Franklin Street, December 2021. (Claire Stremple/KTOO)
    The executive director of the Glory Hall homeless shelter in Juneau, Mariya Lovishchuk, is stepping down from her role after more than a decade of leadership.
    In an interview on Thursday, she said that although she won’t be in charge anymore, she’s not going anywhere. 
    “Well, I think this is why it’s not newsworthy — I think I’m gonna try to do the kind of stuf
  • Combat veterans find solace in weeklong canoe journey to Juneau for Celebration

    Combat veterans find solace in weeklong canoe journey to Juneau for Celebration
    Paddlers in the veterans’ canoe (forefront) wait to land in downtown Juneau on June 4, 2024. (Colette Czarnecki/KSTK)
    About 70 people in six canoes paddled north from Wrangell to Juneau last month for Celebration, a biennial cultural gathering that celebrates Southeast Alaska tribes.
    The canoe journey to the event took a week, and veterans of war paddled one of the canoes. Many of the vets found solace during the expedition, where they were able to be together.
    By Tracy Arm, a fjord about
  • Red Dog’s dwindling ore is forcing the entire region to consider its future

    Red Dog’s dwindling ore is forcing the entire region to consider its future
    The Red Dog mine near Kotzebue is one of the largest zinc-lead mines in the world. (Google Earth)
    The Red Dog mine has been a huge economic engine for the Kotzebue region for decades. But the zinc and lead deposits the mine relies on are running low and Red Dog may shut down operations as soon as 2031. KOTZ’s Desiree Hagen has been following this story.
    Listen:https://media.ktoo.org/wp-content/uploads/2024/06/20240620085810-062024Econ.mp3
    The following transcript has been lightly edited fo
  • 4 men have died in Alaska’s North Slope oil fields in just over a year

    4 men have died in Alaska’s North Slope oil fields in just over a year
    A water truck and blade add layers of ice chips and water to an ice road near a flow line on the Western North Slope in 2017. (Photo by Elizabeth Harball/Alaska’s Energy Desk)
    In the last 14 months, four men have died while working in the oil fields on the North Slope.
    Before that, the area hadn’t seen a death in about five years, according to Anchorage Daily News reporter Alex DeMarban.
    DeMarban has covered the oil and gas industry for years, and said it’s unclear what to attr
  • Newscast – Thursday, June 20, 2024


    https://media.ktoo.org/wp-content/uploads/2024/06/20240620-News-Update.mp3
    In this newscast:Local trail crews are trying to figure out how to keep up with muddier and harder-to-maintain trails in Southeast Alaska caused by climate change.
    New rules for wastewater are on the horizon here in Alaska.
    Seward’s Lydia Jacoby won’t compete in this summer’s Olympics in Paris.
    Two men died after their small plane crashed on Tuesday into Crescent Lake on the Kenia Peninsula.
  • Juneau Afternoon: ‘MixCast’ musical theatre night, plus the ‘Fools Run…’ is back, and the NOAA Large Whale Entanglement Program


    Wednesday, JUne 20, 2024 — Full EpisodeOn today’s program:Juneau Ghost Light Theatre presents: “Mixcast” Saturday, June 22NOAA Large Whale Entanglement ProgramJuneau Police DepartmentOnly Fools Run at Night is back this Friday, June 21
    Bostin Christopher hosts the conversation. Juneau Afternoon airs at 3:00 p.m. on KTOO and KAUK with a rebroadcast at 7:00 p.m. Listen online or subscribe to the podcast at ktoo.org/juneauafternoon.Subscribe to the podcast:Apple Podcast
  • Climate change is muddying the future of trail maintenance in Southeast Alaska

    Climate change is muddying the future of trail maintenance in Southeast Alaska
    Meghan Tabacek, the executive director of Trail Mix Inc., stands over a “gabion basket” that was installed to prevent erosion under a bridge on Juneau’s Black Bear Trail. (Photo by Anna Canny/KTOO)
    Meghan Tabacek stepped off the narrow path of the Black Bear Trail in Juneau and pointed to a U-shaped bend in Montana Creek where loose dirt and tree roots jut out over the water.
    “If this all were to erode out and cut under the bank, then our whole trail could collapse,&rdquo
  • Angoon celebrates launch of long-awaited hydroelectric project

    Members of Aangóon Yátx’i, Angoon’s youth dance group, perform during a celebration to launch the Thayer Creek hydroelectric project in the elementary school gym. (Mary Catharine Martin/2024)https://media.ktoo.org/wp-content/uploads/2024/06/14THAYER.mp3
    It’s taken 44 years, but a hydroelectric project in Angoon finally has all of the funding, and most of the permits, to launch. And while construction on the Thayer Creek Project is still a few months out, organizer
  • Demolition of Fort Greely’s old nuclear plant to begin this year

    Demolition of Fort Greely’s old nuclear plant to begin this year
    Many of the nuclear-power components of the old SM-1A are encased in concrete in the building that still stands at Fort Greely. (U.S. Army photo)
    The Army Corps of Engineers has decided to begin demolition of Fort Greely’s long-mothballed nuclear power plant this summer, a year earlier than planned. That means trucks will begin hauling construction debris off-site this fall.
    The SM-1A nuclear power plant was taken off-line back in 1972, and the most radioactive reactor components were remo
  • As they enter their 60s, Gen Xers projected to see higher cancer rates than Boomers

    New research projects higher cancer rates for Gen X when they hit age 60 compared to Baby Boomers.
    (FatCamera/Getty Images/E+)
    As they head into their golden years, Gen-Xers are more likely to be diagnosed with cancer than the generation born before them, the Baby Boomers, a new National Cancer Institute study finds.
    If current cancer trends continue, the paper published this month in JAMA Network Open concludes, “cancer incidence in the U.S. could remain unacceptably high for decades to c
  • As they enter their 60s, Gen Xers projected to see cancer higher rates than Boomers

    New research projects higher cancer rates for Gen X when they hit age 60 compared to Baby Boomers.
    (FatCamera/Getty Images/E+)
    As they head into their golden years, Gen-Xers are more likely to be diagnosed with cancer than the generation born before them, the Baby Boomers, a new National Cancer Institute study finds.
    If current cancer trends continue, the paper published this month in JAMA Network Open concludes, “cancer incidence in the U.S. could remain unacceptably high for decades to c
  • Crew swims ashore after crab boat sinks in Duncan Canal

    Duncan Canal and the South Kupreanof Roadless area as seen from Portage Mountain west of Petersburg. (KFSK photo)
    A Petersburg-based commercial crab boat capsized in Duncan Canal on the morning of Sunday, June 16. A spokesperson for the U.S. Coast Guard reported that the two people aboard the 22-foot Mangy Otter survived the sinking unharmed.
    The mariners told the Coast Guard that the vessel was pulling crab pots, which they believe shifted the weight of the Mangy Otter and caused it to sink. Th
  • Federal judge considers lawsuit that could decide Alaska tribes’ ability to put land into trust

    Lingít, Haida and Tsimshian people gather in Juneau for the opening of Celebration on June 5, 2024. (Photo by James Brooks/Alaska Beacon)
    This month, hundreds of Lingít, Tsimshian and Haida tribal members gathered in Juneau for Celebration, a four-day, biennial cultural festival.
    As they walked to Juneau’s convention center, attendees passed a black banner advocating “LandBack,” or the return of land to Alaska Native tribes.
    Hundreds of miles away, in Anchorage, a
  • New Alaska water quality rules are coming. Here’s what that could mean for wastewater systems.

    New Alaska water quality rules are coming. Here’s what that could mean for wastewater systems.
    The Anchorage Water and Wastewater Utility building (AWWU)
    New rules for wastewater are on the horizon for Alaska. The EPA has given the state’s Department of Environmental Conservation six to 12 months to update the state’s water quality standards, and the state’s largest wastewater system says new rules could present challenges.
    The updated standards will provide a more accurate estimate of how much fish Alaskans eat, said Gene McCabe, the water division director at the Alask
  • Justice Department says Alaska is discriminating against voters with disabilities

    Justice Department says Alaska is discriminating against voters with disabilities
    A sign directs voters to a polling location in Unalaska in 2020. (Hope McKenney/KUCB)
    The U.S. Department of Justice says the Alaska Division of Elections is discriminating against voters with disabilities.
    The federal agency sent the state a letter alleging multiple violations of the Americans with Disabilities Act over the past four years, at polling places and on the elections website.
    “We must advise you that, if we cannot reach a resolution, the Attorney General may initiate
  • On Juneteenth, Gov. Dunleavy weighs adding a new legal holiday for Alaska

    On Juneteenth, Gov. Dunleavy weighs adding a new legal holiday for Alaska
    Sen. Elvi Gray-Jackson, D-Anchorage, speaks during a Senate floor session in Juneau on Feb, 8, 2019. (Photo by Skip Gray/360 North)
    As Alaska celebrates Juneteenth this Wednesday, Gov. Mike Dunleavy is weighing whether to sign a bill to make it a legal holiday in Alaska.
    Dunleavy has until early July to make a decision on Senate Bill 22. If he approves the measure, it will automatically go into effect for 2025.
    Juneteenth, a portmanteau of “June” and “nineteenth,” celebra
  • Juneau Assembly doubles loan amount available to residents purchasing a mobile home

    Juneau Assembly doubles loan amount available to residents purchasing a mobile home
    Manufactured homes in Lemon Creek on Monday, June 17, 2024. (Clarise Larson/KTOO)
    Housing is tight in Juneau, and that can make it hard for low or middle-income families who want to settle down. To help address that, the Juneau Assembly is increasing the funding in a city loan program for purchasing mobile homes. 
    Since 2016, the city has partnered with True North Federal Credit Union to provide low-interest loans for up to 50% of the down payment of mobile homes, also called manufactured h
  • Alaska faces consequences as federal education funding equity dispute continues

    Alaska faces consequences as federal education funding equity dispute continues
    An empty classroom at Juneau-Douglas High School: Yadaa.at Kalé in Juneau on July 20, 2022. (Photo by Lisa Phu/Alaska Beacon)
    A dispute between Alaska’s education officials and their federal counterparts over whether the state spent pandemic relief equitably has had its first tangible consequence: the state must receive a federal OK before it can spend nearly $1 million in grants.
    The United States Department of Education has put restrictions on the money in addition to labeling the
  • Japanese expedition completes a Denali first, thanks to help from Alaskans

    Japanese expedition completes a Denali first, thanks to help from Alaskans
    Subaru Takeda, Genya Takenaka, and Toranosuke Nagayama take a selfie while climbing a route on Denali. (Courtesy of Subaru Takeda)
    Toranosuke Nagayama and his two climbing partners spent more than two years planning a major expedition on Denali.
    “Alaskan climbing is very special,” Nagayama said. “We are really interested in that, like, a very white world. So we came here.”
    Nagayama flew to Anchorage from Canada last month to finally make the long-awaited trek on Denali. H
  • Newscast – Tuesday, June 18, 2024

    Newscast – Tuesday, June 18, 2024
    https://media.ktoo.org/wp-content/uploads/2024/06/20240618-News-Update.mp3
    In this newscast:Juneau Mayor Beth Weldon announced that she plans to run for a third term in October’s local election,
    The Juneau Assembly is increasing funding in a city loan program for purchasing mobile homes,
    European green crabs are expanding their territory in Southeast Alaska,
    A team of experts on sexual assault is training healthcare professionals to fill gaps in response and care
  • Bill Thomas to drop out of race for House District 3

    Bill Thomas to drop out of race for House District 3
    (Chilkat Valley News file photo)
    Haines Republican Bill Thomas is signaling that he will withdraw from the race for House District 3, though he has not formally done it yet.
    Thomas, 77,  is a lifelong Chilkat Valley resident and served as an Alaska State House member from 2005 to 2012. He registered as a candidate for the seat on May 29.
    But after just over two weeks on the ballot, Thomas told friends and supporters that campaigning takes up a lot of time and it interferes with the commerci
  • Juneau’s hospital set aside $8.1M to buy property. The deal fell through, but that won’t solve Bartlett’s budget issues.

    Juneau’s hospital set aside $8.1M to buy property. The deal fell through, but that won’t solve Bartlett’s budget issues.
    Juneau Bone & Joint Center on Monday, June 17, 2024. (Clarise Larson/KTOO)
    Bartlett Regional Hospital isn’t taking over the Juneau Bone & Joint property after all. 
    On Monday, the Juneau Assembly authorized the hospital to put $8.1 million back into its savings. That money was originally supposed to buy the property that houses the business.
    The decision comes as the board for Juneau’s city-owned hospital contemplates cutting or reducing some services to address a major
  • Juneau’s mayor is running for reelection

    Juneau’s mayor is running for reelection
    Juneau Mayor Beth Weldon talks during a city meeting in December 2023. (Clarise Larson/KTOO)
    Juneau Mayor Beth Weldon has announced that she plans to run for a third term in October’s local election. 
    In an interview on Tuesday, she said the decision to run didn’t come easy. 
    “It’s been an extremely tough decision to make, especially with my husband, Greg’s, passing,” she said. “But I just come back to the same thoughts that I’m committed
  • Accidental discovery of sunken ship near Sitka reveals surprising history

    A dive team investigated the site of a sunken wooden vessel in Herring Cove on Friday, June 14, 2024. (Katherine Rose/KCAW)
    On Sunday June 9, a mariner fouled his anchor in Herring Cove. Every time he tried to move the anchor, a little oil sheen and debris would pop up.
    “He called us to check and make sure that there wasn’t any known debris in the area, and to try to see if there was a known snag,” said Petty Officer First Class Heather Darce in an interview with KCAW. Darce is
  • Invasive European green crabs are expanding their territory in Southeast Alaska

    Invasive European green crabs are expanding their territory in Southeast Alaska
    European green crabs collected from Metlakatla’s Tamgas Harbor this week. The crabs were trapped in shrimp pots. (Photo courtesy of Dustin Winter).
    Alaska Department of Fish and Game announced on Friday that shells of the invasive European green crab were spotted along the shores of Bostwick Inlet on Gravina Island near Ketchikan.
    European green crabs have the potential to wreak havoc on commercial and subsistence fisheries in Alaska — the crabs are highly competitive and very hungry
  • Coalition of labor and Alaska Native leaders throws its weight behind Peltola

    Coalition of labor and Alaska Native leaders throws its weight behind Peltola
    U.S. Congresswoman Mary Peltola speaking to the Alaska Federation of Natives in 2023. (Matt Faubion/Alaska Public Media)
    A new organization called Alaska Jobs Coalition has launched a $500,000 ad campaign to support Alaska Congresswoman Mary Peltola.
    The online and TV spots laud Peltola’s support for Willow, the Conoco Phillips project to develop oilfields in the National Petroleum Reserve Alaska.
    The Alaska Jobs Coalition formed earlier this year as a non-profit and announced that its ini
  • Trump announces his pick in Alaska’s US House race: Dahlstrom

    Trump announces his pick in Alaska’s US House race: Dahlstrom
    Donald Trump promoted Sarah Palin for U.S. House at a 2022 rally in Anchorage. She finished second. (Kendrick Whiteman/Alaska Public Media)
    Former President Donald Trump has endorsed Republican candidate Nancy Dahlstrom in the race for Alaska’s sole seat in the U.S. House.
    In a post on his Truth Social platform, Trump called Dahlstrom a “winner” and a “proven fighter.”
    Dahlstrom is a former legislator and former commissioner of Corrections. She’s now Alaska&rs
  • Seward’s Lydia Jacoby won’t swim 100-meter breaststroke event at Paris Olympics

    Seward’s Lydia Jacoby won’t swim 100-meter breaststroke event at Paris Olympics
    Seward swimmer Lydia Jacoby greets fans at the Anchorage airport after returning home from the 2021 Olympic trials. (Valerie Lake/Alaska Public Media)
    Seward swimming phenom Lydia Jacoby fell short of an Olympic sequel Monday after failing to clinch a fast enough time in the 100-meter women’s breaststroke final event.
    Jacoby, 20, placed third in the 100-meter breaststroke finals in Indianapolis. She swam a time of 1:06:37, in the same event she took home Olympic gold in 2021 with a time of
  • Newscast – Monday, June 17, 2024


    https://media.ktoo.org/wp-content/uploads/2024/06/20240617-News-Update.mp3
    In this newscast:It’s taken 44 years, but a hydroelectric project in Angoon finally has all the funding and most of the permits to launch,
    A rare mountain lion was shot and killed on Wrangell Island earlier this month,
    Tongass Voices: The Evening Star on creating spaces for queer Indigenous people
  • Tongass Voices: The Evening Star on creating spaces for queer Indigenous people

    Tongass Voices: The Evening Star on creating spaces for queer Indigenous people
    The Evening Star performs at the Crystal Saloon in Juneau on June 11, 2024. (Ḵaachgóon Rochelle Smallwood/Raven’s Tail Studio)
    This is Tongass Voices, a series from KTOO sharing weekly perspectives from the homelands of the Áak’w Kwáan and beyond.
    The Evening Star is a Pawnee and adopted Athabascan performer who’s known for storytelling, comedy, making music, and DJing. She came to Juneau during Celebration on her Indigequeer  tour. 
    She
  • State sues Alaska Motor Home after customers say they were swindled and harassed

    State sues Alaska Motor Home after customers say they were swindled and harassed
    Recreational vehicles parked outside the office of Alaska Motor Home on June 14, 2024. (Matt Faubion/Alaska Public Media)
    An Anchorage renter of recreational vehicles has again been sued by the state over deceptive business practices — three years after the firm was penalized for similar issues.
    Alaska Motor Home, along with registered owners Peter and Cole Harkovitch, are named in a state complaint filed Thursday. The company, which faced state action in 2019, has abruptly closed its door
  • Coast Guard icebreaker Healy headed to Alaska for three Arctic research missions

    Coast Guard icebreaker Healy headed to Alaska for three Arctic research missions
    The U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy, a 420-foot icebreaker homeported in Seattle, breaks ice in support of scientific research in the Arctic Ocean during a 2006 cruise. The Healy is now on its way to Alaska and scheduled to complete three missions this year, including a sailing through the Northwest Passage to Greenland. (Photo by Petty Officer Second Class Prentice Danner/U.S. Coast Guard)
    The U.S. Coast Guard cutter Healy, the largest U.S. icebreaker, is on its way to Alaska for the first of thr
  • An influx of chum salmon in the Canadian Arctic could be the same fish missing from Western Alaska

    An influx of chum salmon in the Canadian Arctic could be the same fish missing from Western Alaska
    Frankie Dillon displays a chum salmon caught in the Big Fish River, near Aklavik, Northwest Territories, in 2023. (Photo by Colin Gallagher, DFO)
    Johnnie Storr grew up fishing with his dad in the hamlet of Aklavik, a small town on the Mackenzie River Delta in Canada’s Northwest Territories. Depending on the season, they looked for Arctic char, Dolly Varden or whitefish.
    “We fished for char in the fall time,” Storr said. “Soon as there was enough ice, we walked out and set
  • Newscast – Friday, June 14, 2024


    https://media.ktoo.org/wp-content/uploads/2024/06/20240614-News-Update.mp3
    In this newscast:Cultural ambassadors are now at the Mendenhall Glacier Visitor Center to teach Lingit culture and history to tourists,
    Representative Mary Peltola recently introduced two bills aimed at addressing bycatch in federal trawl fisheries
  • Juneau Afternoon: ‘Pretendians’ podcast, SHI Multilingual Audio Dictionary, ‘Mom’s Unhinged’


    Screenshot of the Multilingual Audio Dictionary from Sealaska Heritage InstituteFriday, June 14, 2024 — Full EpisodeOn today’s program:“Pretendians” is Canadaland’s newest podcast: What do some of the most prominent and successful Indigenous artists, leaders and professors have in common? They aren’t IndigenousThe newly launched “Multilingual Audio Dictionary” from Sealaska Heritage Institute“Moms Unhinged” comedy show at Centennial Hal
  • New cultural ambassadors deepen tourists’ experience of Juneau’s Mendenhall Glacier


    Jinkasee.ee Rose Willard explains a náxw, or halibut hook to visitors. She is one of 10 cultural ambassadors at the Mendenhall Glacier Visitor Center on June 13, 2024. (Photo by Yvonne Krumrey/KTOO)https://media.ktoo.org/wp-content/uploads/2024/06/14ambassadors.mp3
    When tourists come to Juneau, the Mendenhall Glacier is usually near the top of their sightseeing list. It gets hundreds of thousands of visitors each summer.
    And now, those visitors will have the chance to learn more about Indi
  • An Alaska energy blogger breaks down the looming, much-nuanced Cook Inlet gas shortfall

    An Alaska energy blogger breaks down the looming, much-nuanced Cook Inlet gas shortfall
    A specialized unit called a jackup rig, at left, drilled a natural gas well last year at Hilcorp’s Tyonek platform, right, in Cook Inlet. (Nathaniel Herz for Alaska Public Media)
    Alaskans who depend on natural gas for heat or electricity are confronting a looming shortfall in Cook Inlet, and many of them have questions about how soon utilities might need to start more expensive gas imports.
    There are a few proposals to lessen the blow to ratepayers’ pocketbooks, but some are wonderin

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