• Public Heritage: Negotiating Best Practice

    Public Heritage: Negotiating Best Practice
    The historic environment of Britain includes rich and diverse sites and landscapes, with materials and archives curated by a range of organisations. As archaeologists working in across sectors in Wales, we are interested in how public heritage best practices are developed across different regions and countries in these islands. There are many stakeholders in public heritage – some of specific relevant to different national or regional concerns – and including those working in museums
  • DNA Analysis Offers Clues to Production of the Dead Sea Scrolls

    TEL AVIV, ISRAEL—According to a Science News report, molecular biologist Oded Rechavi of Tel Aviv University and his colleagues analyzed animal DNA obtained from 26 Dead Sea Scroll fragments in order to study the possible origins of the ancient parchments. After they excluded the DNA left behind by people who handled the scrolls, the researchers determined that two of the fragments were made from cowskin, and the rest were made from sheepskin. Further analysis of mitochondrial DNA and nucl
  • Human Remains Unearthed in Copenhagen

    COPENHAGEN, DENMARK—The Copenhagen Post reports that the remains of 15 people of various ages at the time of death have been unearthed at a construction site in Copenhagen. Archaeologist Sigrid Frances Schmidt said one of the bones had been sawn through, while others bear marks or notches. Further examination of the remains may connect them to studies carried out at Denmark’s Royal Surgical Academy from the late eighteenth century to the mid-nineteenth century, Schmidt added. To read
  • Evidence of 5,000-Year-Old Fabric Found in Scotland

    ORKNEY, SCOTLAND—BBC News reports that Lorraine Clay, Jan Blatchford, and Roy Towers of the University of the Highlands and Islands have found evidence of a 5,000-year-old woven textile at the Ness of Brodgar, a six-acre complex made up of Neolithic buildings and a stone wall that may have once extended across Orkney’s Brodgar Peninsula. Clay was examining pottery from the site when she saw an impression of a piece of cord on two fragments from the same vessel. These marks may have c
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  • 1,600-Year-Old Wooden Saddle Examined

    BARNAUL, RUSSIA—According to a Horsetalk.co.nz report, Nikolai Seregin of Altai State University and his colleagues have studied a completely preserved wooden saddle and other equestrian items discovered in 2015 at Urd Ulaan Uneet, a cave burial in Mongolia located some 4,300 feet above sea level. Seregin and his team members suggest that the burial, which they dated from the middle of the fourth century to the fifth century A.D., belonged to the nomadic Rouran people, who were known
  • Roman Bath Discovered in Swiss Spa Town

    BADEN, SWITZERLAND—Swissinfo.ch reports that an ancient bath was discovered during a construction project in Baden, a town known to the Romans as Aquae Helveticae for its thermal springs. The Roman-era bath probably fell out of use by the medieval period, when the open-air St. Verena Baths was built at the site and used into the nineteenth century, “We thought we might find the bath here, but it was still a huge surprise when we saw that it was in such good condition,” said arc
  • Administrative Assitant/Receptionist

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  • Archaeological Project Manager- New Orleans, LA

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  • Position Announcement- Field Archaeologist

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  • Employment Listing- Archaeological Assistant Project Manager

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  • Audio News for May 24th through the 30th, 2020


    News items read by Laura Pettigrew include:Virtual platform brings Jewish heritage sites to life(details)Genetic study of skeletons reveals Lebanon’s long continuity (details)Mining company destroys sacred aboriginal site 46,000 years old(details)Dental tartar shows what people ate in Japan’s Edo period(details)
  • Archaeological Field Technician- Raleigh, NC

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  • Statue Unearthed in Ancient City of Patara

    ANTALYA, TURKEY—Hürriyet Daily News reports that a tenth sculpture has been unearthed at the site of the stage building in the theater at the ancient Lycian city of Patara, which is located on Turkey’s Mediterranean coast. Construction of the stage was begun by Quintus Vilius Titianus, a leading citizen of Patara, and completed by his daughter Vilia Prokla after his death. Archaeologist Havva İșkan Ișik of Akdeniz University thinks this 1,900-year-old statue, whic
  • Cannabis Detected on 2,700-Year-Old Altar in Israel

    JERUSALEM, ISRAEL—According to a Science News report, researchers led by Eran Arie of the Israel Museum in Jerusalem and Dvory Namdar of the Volcani Center of Agricultural Research analyzed residues on two altars placed at the entrance to a shrine discovered in the 1960s at southern Israel’s site of Tel Arad. Part of a fortress guarding the kingdom of Judah’s southern border, the shrine is thought to have been in use between 760 and 715 B.C. and is now on display in the Israel
  • Medieval Sugar Mill Found in Northern India

    AGRA, INDIA—The Times of India reports that a stone sugar mill has been unearthed on farmland in northern India. Manvendra Kumar Pundhir of Aligarh Muslim University said medieval sugar mills were comprised of a mortar and pestle to crush sugarcane and extract sugarcane juice. The recovered piece of this mill measures about 12 feet long and about eight and one-half feet in diameter. Geared sugar rolling mills came into use in the seventeenth century. For more on archaeology in northern Ind
  • Creative Frontiers

    Creative Frontiers
    Applying Theory
    to foster
    discussion
    beyond
    research,
    is
    to build
    perceptions
    in society.
    (Kavanagh, 2018)
    Influencing perceptions is a role attributed to public intellectuals, yet archaeologists appear to be absent from inhabiting such a stage (Tarlow and Stutz, 2013). This session seeks to question if this is actually so, when our collective and individual works are engaged with the process of re-creating worlds, potentially impacting the way that society can be perceived.
    We therefore conten
  • Second Viking Ship Burial Detected on Norway’s Edoya Island

    OSLO, NORWAY—Life in Norway reports that the completed georadar survey of Edoya Island, which is located off the coast of western Norway, has revealed a second Viking ship burial. The first ship burial, now known as the Edoya ship, was detected on the small island last fall. Manuel Gabler of the Norwegian Institute for Cultural Heritage Research (NIKU) said the data indicates an object about 24 feet long and three feet wide had been placed inside a circular structure thought to be a round
  • Was Rock Art in Australia Created With Wax Stencils?

    ADELAIDE, AUSTRALIA—Cosmos Magazine reports that a team of researchers, including representatives of the traditional Marra people and archaeologist Liam Brady of Flinders University, investigated how miniature stencils in the Yilbilinji rock shelter in northern Australia’s Limmen National Park might have been created. According to the researchers, the images, which include human figures, crabs, turtles, kangaroo paws, an echidna, boomerangs, and geometric shapes, have curved edges, a
  • Gilt-Bronze Burial Shoes Unearthed in South Korea

    NORTH GYEONGSANG PROVINCE, SOUTH KOREA—According to a Korea Herald report, a pair of gilt-bronze shoes thought to date to the late fifth or early sixth century A.D. was found in one of three tombs at a burial site in Gyeongju, the ancient capital of the Silla Kingdom in eastern South Korea. The tomb also contained saddles, bronze ware, iron pots, and earthenware. Researchers from the Silla Cultural Heritage Research Institute said such shoes were covered with T-shaped holes and were only u
  • Senior Archaeologist / Cultural Resource Specialist

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  • Senior Archaeologist-Principal Investigator (Office and Fieldwork – California and Nevada)

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  • Possible Viking Grave Uncovered in Norway

    BODØ, NORWAY—According to a report in The Local, a couple installing insulation under the floor of their home in northern Norway discovered a dark blue glass bead and a Viking ax dated to between A.D. 950 and 1050. “We first thought it was the wheel of a toy car,” said homeowner Mariann Kristiansen, whose grandfather built the house in 1914. She immediately reported the find to local authorities. Archaeologist Martinus Hauglid of the Nordland county government visited th
  • 200-Year-Old Shipwreck Found in Caribbean Sea

    QUINTANA ROO, MEXICO—BBC News reports that an eight-foot cannon, anchor, and pig-iron ingots thought to have been used as a ship’s ballast were spotted by a fisherman in the Caribbean Sea off the coast of southern Mexico. The wreckage rests in shallow waters and rough ocean currents at the Banco Chinchorro atoll reef, a dangerous area where 70 historic shipwrecks have been registered. Archaeologists from Mexico’s National Institute of Anthropology and History said the vessel co
  • Roman Villa Uncovered in Northern Italy

    NEGRAR, ITALY—According to a report in The Guardian, a well-preserved mosaic floor and foundations of a Roman villa first discovered in 1922 have been uncovered in a vineyard in northern Italy by archaeologists from the Superintendency of Archaeology, Fine Arts, and Landscape of Verona. The villa is thought to date to the third century A.D. The researchers are still working on mapping the structure’s footprint. To read about the excavation of a lavish Roman villa in Positano, go
  • Face of Priest Buried at Lincoln Cathedral Reconstructed

    LINCOLN, ENGLAND—Lincolnshire Live reports that forensic reconstruction artist Hew Morrison has recreated the face of a 900-year-old skeleton unearthed on the grounds of Lincoln Cathedral. The man was buried with a chalice and paten, items associated with Christian communion practices, and is thought to have been a Christian priest. “It’s based on the information that the skeleton has told us about his age, and any problems he may have had and from photographs of the skull,&rdq
  • 2,200-Year-Old Swan-Shaped Bronze Vessel Found in China

    HENAN PROVINCE, CHINA—China.org reports that a 2,200-year-old tomb has been excavated in central China, at an ancient city site situated along the route between the two ancient capitals of Xi’an and Luoyang. According to Zhu Xiaodong of the Sanmenxia Institute of Cultural Relics and Archaeology, the tomb may have belonged to a low-ranking official buried around 200 B.C., at the time of the transfer from the Qin Dynasty to the Han Dynasty. Among the artifacts in the tomb, researchers
  • Well-Preserved Medieval Brooch Discovered in England

    NORFOLK, ENGLAND—BBC News reports that a brooch estimated to be 1,100 years old was found in a landscaped field in the East of England. The Saxon artifact is thought to have been transported to the field in a load of topsoil, where it was discovered by a metal detectorist. The pin, which measures about three inches in diameter, has a high silver content and is decorated with a perpendicular cross placed over a diagonal one, animals, and a stacked pot motif. Archaeologist Steven Ashley of t
  • LEAD & CREW NEEDED IN GRAND RAPIDS MN >> JUNE 2ND

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  • Staff Archaeologist - Midwest U.S.

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  • NAGPRA Coordinator at Auburn University

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  • Location, Location, Location: Constructing Frontier Identity

    Location, Location, Location: Constructing Frontier Identity
    “Where are you from?” That is one of the first questions asked when you meet someone new. Your answer informs your new acquaintance of your cultural background and current geographic affiliation. Your identity is at least partially informed by where you live, or where you originated. A geographically defined identity is recognizable in the archaeological record. The regions of a culture group vary in their material culture and practices, but are still recognizably related. Among thes
  • ARCHAEOLOGICAL FIELD TECHNICIANS – Eastern/Central Pennsylvania

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  • Audio News for May 17th through the 23rd, 2020


    News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: 3D Footprints in Tanzania suggest gendered group activities(details)Competition with modern humans may have been the cause of Neanderthal extinction, new research suggests(details)Cadaver dogs may become archaeologists’ newest noninvasive tool(details)Bone arrowpoint in southern Africa gives early date for advanced human cognition(details)
  • Ancient Greek Inscription Discovered in Bulgaria

    BURGAS, BULGARIA—According to a BNR Radio Bulgaria report, a Greek inscription found on a limestone sarcophagus dated to the second or third century A.D. is the first written evidence that the Roman colony of Deultum had a port. Researchers from the Deultum-Debelt National Archaeological Reserve said the strategically important colony, established in the first century A.D. at the mouth of the River Sredetska, was equipped with a sewer system and baths, and reported directly to the Roman em
  • Butchery Marks Suggest Paleolithic Hunters Ate Large Carnivores

    KRAKÓW, POLAND—Science in Poland reports that Piotr Wojtal of the Polish Academy of Sciences identified butchered wolf bones among a collection of 30,000-year-old flint and bone artifacts and tools unearthed in the Czech Republic. “Until now, scientists were convinced that wolves and other predators were the target of hunting primarily because of their skins, and certainly not as a source of meat,” Wojtal said. Some of the marks on the wolf bones were the result of remov
  • Study Identifies Foods Enjoyed by Africa’s Early Muslims

    EXETER, ENGLAND—Archaeologists led by Timothy Insoll of the University of Exeter suggest residents of the sites of Harlaa, Harar, and Ganda Harlaa in eastern Ethiopia began to eat a halal diet some 400 years before major mosques and burial sites were established in the region, according to a statement released by the University of Exeter. Insoll explained, however, that these early followers of Islam may have built smaller mosques that have not yet been found. The researchers examined some
  • Archaeologists in Spain Seek Grave of 16th-Century Irish Hero

    VALLADOLID, SPAIN—The Irish Times reports that a team of researchers led by archaeologist Óscar Burón have uncovered human remains at what may be the burial place of Red Hugh O’Donnell, an Irish nobleman who led a rebellion against the government in Ireland and died in Spain in 1602, after attempting to persuade Spanish king Philip III to send additional troops to Ireland to continue the fight against the English. Historical accounts record that O’Donnell’s
  • Dozens of Mammoths Discovered in Mexico

    MEXICO CITY, MEXICO—According to an Associated Press report, the remains of some 60 mammoths have been unearthed at a construction site in central Mexico, about six miles away from two pits dug about 15,000 years ago to trap the giant beasts. Bones from at least 14 mammoths, some of which had been butchered, were recovered from those pits last year. Archaeologist Pedro Sánchez Nava of Mexico’s National Institute of Anthropology and History said there could be hundreds of sets
  • Study Suggests New Dates for the Spread of Writing in Japan

    SAKURAI, JAPAN—The Asahi Shimbun reports that archaeologist Yasuo Yanagida of Kokugakuin University examined 150 stone artifacts unearthed in western Japan and dated to the Yayoi Pottery Culture period (ca. 1000 B.C.–A.D. 250) and the Kofun Period, which spanned the third to seventh century A.D. The items had previously been identified as whetstones, but Yanagida suggests they may have been used to mix ink for writing. Such ink slabs usually have hollows where the ink was rubbed and
  • GIS Manager (Los Angeles or San Bernardino County-based)

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  • Steaming Plant or Steam Punk? Researching Industrial Archaeology and Heritage in the 21st Century

    Steaming Plant or Steam Punk? Researching Industrial Archaeology and Heritage in the 21st Century
    This session seeks to build on the discussion of a decade ago about the role of industrial archaeology and industrial heritage research and fieldwork. This lively debate was captured in the 2009 Horning and Palmer edited volume ‘Crossing Paths or Sharing Tracks? Future directions in the archaeological study of post-1550 Britain and Ireland’. There are over 600 independent volunteer-run industrial museums in the UK and nine industrial-themed UK World Heritage Sites, whilst around two-
  • Computer Model Simulates Neanderthal Extinction Scenarios

    BUSAN, SOUTH KOREA—According to a statement released by the Institute for Basic Science (IBS), a team of researchers led by Axel Timmermann of the IBS Center for Climate Physics created a supercomputer model to simulate possible scenarios for the collapse of Neanderthal populations between 38,000 and 43,000 years ago. The migration of Neanderthals and modern humans, their interactions and interbreeding, and the rapidly fluctuating climate of the period were all taken into account, Timmerma
  • 300,000-Year-Old Scavenged Elephant Found in Germany

    SCHÖNINGEN, GERMANY—Live Science reports that a nearly complete 300,000-year-old elephant skeleton (Palaeoloxodon antiquus) has been unearthed near the site of a large lake in northwestern Germany. Researchers led by Jordi Serangeli of the University of Tübingen have also recovered 30 small flint flakes and two bone tools at the site, which suggest that a human relative such as Homo heidelbergensis scavenged the carcass. The bone tools may have been used to sharpen stone tools, s
  • Cultural Resources Laboratory Manager

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  • Archaeological Field Technician (Temporary) - Columbia, South Carolina

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  • Neolithic House Mouse Found in Europe

    YORK, ENGLAND—According to a statement released by the University of York, archaeologist David Orton and his colleagues sieved soil samples collected from the floors of burned houses in a late Neolithic village in Serbia and recovered tiny mouse bones. Orton explained that it had been previously thought that Neolithic sites outside of the Mediterranean were not heavily populated enough to support the rodents. The bones, from Mus musculus domesticus, or the eastern subspecies of house mouse
  • Scientists Track 15,000 Years’ Worth of Ear Infections

    TEL AVIV, ISRAEL—Haaretz reports that a study of human remains buried in the Levant between 15,000 and 100 years ago suggests that the onset of agriculture—and the corresponding decrease of variety and increase of grains in the diet—may not have harmed people’s health as previously thought. Hila May of Tel Aviv University and her colleagues examined the internal wall of the middle ears of the remains to look for evidence of chronic ear infections, which are usually brough
  • Field Techs needed in the Northeast June 2020

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  • 14,000-Year-Old Ancestor of Native Americans Identified in Russia

    JENA, GERMANY—He Yu of the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History and her colleagues analyzed DNA extracted from a 14,000-year-old tooth fragment unearthed by archaeologists in south-central Russia in the 1970s, and found that its mixture of ancient North Eurasian and Northeast Asian ancestry matches that of today’s Native Americans, according to a Science Magazine report. Ust-Kyakhta, the Siberian site where the tooth was found, is situated between Lake Baikal and the
  • SOI Qualified Archaeologist - Alpharetta, GA

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