• Miso-glazed butternut pumpkin

    Miso-glazed butternut pumpkin
    ImageBy Nihal AbedAbstract This dish really is best eaten at room temperature because when the pumpkin roasts, the natural juices will come to the surface in a pool. When it rests, those juices will get absorbed back in, and will be heavenly.
  • Giant burrito cake

    Giant burrito cake
    ImageBy Henry FirthIan TheasbyAbstract A giant burrito, wrapped up warm then baked in a saucepan = the most amazing sharing platter you ever had! Inspired by our good friends at Jungle Creations, this dish is incredibly easy and impressive. 
  • Sticky Pears Anyone ?

    Monday Morning Cooking Club Revisits an Old Favourite – Slow Roasted Pears
    This is a fabulous do-ahead and dairy-free dessert: Slow-roasted pears. And I promise you they are the best cooked pears you will ever eat! The recipe comes from my friend Judy who got it from a well known Australian chef Marieke Brugman. Marieke used to run an extraordinary weekend-retreat cooking school called ‘Howquadale’ in the stunning Victorian Snowy River horse country (seen ‘The Man fr
  • White Chocolate and Passionfruit Mousse

    This delicious, airy, sweet mousse is a current favourite of the Monday Morning Cooking Club team, especially with summer approaching.  It is a refreshing yet sophisticated dessert from the kitchen of Janette Kornhauser on the Gold Coast and appears in our new book, Now for Something Sweet.
    It looks gorgeous served in individual glasses.
    Choose a good quality white chocolate for this recipe, it will really make a difference.
      
      White Chocolate and Passionfruit MousseCourseS
  • Advertisement

  • Sesame, Eggplant and Noodle Salad

    I bet if you asked anyone who came to our place for lunch in the 90s, they would remember this dish. I rediscovered it some years ago after searching through my messy and huge unfiled random recipe file.  I’m not sure if I should say ’embarrassingly’ or rather just ‘ironically’, this outstanding recipe came from a Kikkoman ad in a magazine – I think it must have been my first foray into ‘Asian’ cooking long, long ago. But guess what’s ba
  • Monday Morning Cooking Club Minestrone

    We’ve fallen in love with this minestrone. It is such a simple recipe – but the long cooking time provides a beautiful richness and depth of flavour.
    If it is too thick towards the end of cooking, add some more water. If you would like to add some small pasta shapes (like risoni), do so at the same time as the lentils along with an extra cup of water. And don’t forget to season to taste at the end – it’s really the most important step. If you prefer other veggies, y
  • Crisp Skinned Barramundi with Peperonata Agrodolce

    The pepperonata agrodolce – which can be made well in advance – is a lovely combination of capsicum (peppers) and onion with salty capers, sweet raisins and a slightly acidic dressing.
    It is wonderful (as in this recipe) as an accompaniment to simply chargrilled or seared fish fillets. And it also goes well as part of an antipasto plate with some well toasted sourdough bread on the side. 
    The recipe comes to us from Harold Finger who has been it this for many years and was kind
  • Michael’s Spicy Wasabi Tuna Tartare

    A Delicious Starter for Summer Entertaining
    Michael, one of my seven nephews, is a chef.  We love talking food and eating out together, in fact he came along on my recent amazing food trip to Tennessee and we had a ball.
    A few years ago we had Friday night dinner together in Melbourne, where he lives, and he whipped up this divine Spicy Wasabi Tuna Tartare. Imagine my disappointment that I missed the week before when he smoked and BBQ’d his own brisket!
    One bite of the tuna tartare an
  • Advertisement

  • The Only Avocado Dip You Will Ever Need

    You’re probably thinking – who needs another avo dip ?!?!
    We thought the same, until we tried this one.
    The recipe comes from Natanya (my MondayMorningCookingClub sister) who got it many years ago from her good friend Jeff Engelman, and it has now become a staple part of my cooking repertoire.
    The recipe was first published in our third book, It’s Always About the Food. Avocado Dip (Guacamole)CourseSides and StartersCuisineInternationalServings2 cupsPrep Time20 minutesIngredien
  • BBQ seared Murray cod with lemon myrtle pippies

    BBQ seared Murray cod with lemon myrtle pippies
    ImageBy Jody OrcherAbstract A vibrant and fresh mix of river cod and pippies, bursting with the unique flavour of lemon myrtle and a slight chilli kick.
  • Flathead with emu egg Thermidor sauce

    Flathead with emu egg Thermidor sauce
    ImageBy Josh LewisAbstract A 1980s classic is given a modern Australian twist, with a Thermidor sauce using emu egg and milk kefir; crisp black kale adds an aromatic edge to complete the dish.
  • Kangaroo tonnato

    Kangaroo tonnato
    ImageBy Jason SaxbyAbstract This dish is a hybrid of two classic dishes: tartare and vitello tonnato (cold sliced veal in a creamy sauce of tuna and capers). The combination of classic Italian flavours with native Australian ingredients gives this tonnato a fresh, vibrant appeal.
  • Steamed duck, winter melon and shiitake soup

    Steamed duck, winter melon and shiitake soup
    ImageBy Martin BoetzAbstract Winter melon (actually in season spring-summer) has a mild taste that absorbs the flavour of this deeply aromatic broth. Add into the mix earthy shiitake mushrooms and duck, and you have one soothing, aromatic concoction.
  • Paperbark smoked Blue mackerel, papaya salad, Davidson plum dressing

    Paperbark smoked Blue mackerel, papaya salad, Davidson plum dressing
    ImageBy Ari WalpoleAbstract Davidson plums are a distinctive, deep purplish-red fruit from Northern NSW. In this recipe, they lend a uniquely Australian sour tang to a quintessentially Thai dish. If boning and butterflying the mackerel is a little daunting, then Tasmanian ocean trout fillet is an excellent substitute.
  • Boon Cafe’s chiffon cake

    Boon Cafe’s chiffon cake
    ImageBy Boon CafeAbstract Light and airy chiffon cake is the perfect vehicle for allowing the sweet herbaceous aroma and vibrant green colour of pandan to shine. Topped with coconut, a classic flavour combination for pandan, this is a wonderfully tropical dessert.
  • Mud crab, white asparagus, pin-striped peanut salad

    Mud crab, white asparagus, pin-striped peanut salad
    ImageBy Peter GilmoreAbstract This impressive-looking salad, topped with matchsticks of asparagus, brings together a small but mighty list of ingredients. A delicate balance of lemon and creme fraiche enhances the sweetness of the mud crab.
  • Coconut tapioca cream, lime curd and guava

    Coconut tapioca cream, lime curd and guava
    ImageBy Christine ManfieldAbstract This elegant make-ahead dessert is an explosion of tropical flavours, with fragrant guava sorbet and sliced fresh guava, zesty lime curd and tapioca-flecked coconut cream. 
  • Thai no-fishcakes

    Thai no-fishcakes
    ImageBy Henry FirthIan TheasbyAbstract We made Thai fishcakes vegan-style, using jackfruit instead of fish, so you can still enjoy the gorgeously subtle spiciness of fishcakes with the freshness of the dipping sauce.
  • Cocoa-rubbed ribs

    Cocoa-rubbed ribs
    ImageBy Spencer WattsAbstract Everybody loves ribs on the barbeque, sweet, succulent smoky ribs, they’re just delicious - but these cocoa ribs are the best you’ll ever had!
  • Chocolate pizza

    Chocolate pizza
    ImageBy Spencer WattsAbstract We all have a kid that lives inside of us ... whether you are a kid at heart or a real life kid, this chocolate pizza is for you. It's got caramelised white chocolate, dark choc ganache and cherries! You can use purchased pizza dough for this recipe, or make your own. 
  • Witlof tarte tatin

    Witlof tarte tatin
    ImageBy Danielle AlvarezAbstract When presented with this idea, the first question most people ask is, ‘Is it sweet?’ or ‘Is it savoury?’ and the answer is, it’s both. I would, however, not serve this as a dessert. To me, the sweetness mixed with the slight bitterness of the witlof makes this unquestioningly savoury. I would serve it with a leafy green salad with a sharp mustard vinaigrette, maybe with some cornichons and a piece of soft goat’s cheese as
  • Mum's flan with poached cherries

    Mum's flan with poached cherries
    ImageBy Danielle AlvarezAbstract A decadent burnt sugar dessert popular in Spain and Latin America, this version is flavoured with juicy poached cherries for a delightful sweet tang and gorgeous deep red colour.
  • Mom's flan with poached cherries

    Mom's flan with poached cherries
    ImageBy Danielle AlvarezAbstract A decadent burnt sugar dessert popular in Spain and Latin America, this version is flavoured with juicy poached cherries for a delightful sweet tang and gorgeous deep red colour.
  • Greens and onion galette with creme fraiche and Comté

    Greens and onion galette with creme fraiche and Comté
    ImageBy Danielle AlvarezAbstract I am a sucker for a savoury galette. I also love greens and always have too many in my fridge. I realise that topping a buttery crust with loads of greens doesn’t make this a health food, but I can pretend can’t I? I do, however, know that even if we are talking about a pie, if you’re able to get loads of nutrient-dense greens into it and make it into something delicious that you can share with friends and family then it is still waaaaaay better
  • Pineapple and ginger upside-down cake

    Pineapple and ginger upside-down cake
    ImageBy Danielle AlvarezAbstract The way the fruit softens and caramelises and then mixes with the cake batter, which absorbs its sweet juices, is just perfection. And it looks so gorgeous. The best part is, this cake could be adapted to any fruit really: plums, nectarines, peaches, apricots, strawberries, blueberries, or, in this case, my favourite of all the upside-down cakes, pineapple. The ginger adds a spicy note that works well with the pineapple, but it doesn’t overpower. The cake e
  • Tomato, onion and cheddar tart

    Tomato, onion and cheddar tart
    ImageBy Danielle AlvarezAbstract The pastry for this tart incorporates both butter and sour cream and it just makes the easiest, most delicious, delicate, flaky, buttery tart you have ever tasted. I love this pastry for savoury preparations that are baked in tins as opposed to free-form galettes, which require a sturdier dough. This recipe is inspired by my friend Martin Boetz. He made a version of this, without tomato, at a lunch we were cooking at. He told me it was his grandmother&rsquo
  • Flaky dough

    Flaky dough
    ImageBy Danielle AlvarezAbstract A delicious homemade dough that can be used for pizzas or the gorgeous greens galette. The key to making good dough is to keep everything super, super cold. I usually measure out my water first and put it in the freezer. I will also cut my butter and just toss with the dry ingredients and put that bowl in the freezer too for about 5 minutes. You’ll also find what brand of butter works for you. A butter with a higher fat-to-liquid ratio is best,
  • Dobo (Armenian meatloaf)

    Dobo (Armenian meatloaf)
    ImageBy Tania KeshishianAbstract Before fleeing Syria and landing in Brisbane where she now works as a cook for Espresso Train in Nundah, Tania was a registered nurse, for 19 years played basketball in a national league, and even started her own small painting business.
  • Laksa cob loaf dip

    Laksa cob loaf dip
    ImageBy Cossies Poolside Bar and BistroAbstract At Cossies Poolside Bar and Bistro we're all about the cob loaf. It’s our signature dish! We've tried a number of flavours such as butter chicken, mac and cheese and Mexican salsa cobs, so we thought it’s about time we take the Darwin delicacy of Laksa and add it into the mix!
  • Eggplant katsu

    Eggplant katsu
    ImageBy Henry FirthIan TheasbyAbstract The beautifully light but comfortingly warm katsu sauce is amazing with the mighty eggplant.
  • Milk kefir

    Milk kefir
    ImageBy Sharon FlynnAbstract Kefir translates to 'pleasure' or 'feeling good', and for good reason - it is my chosen powerhouse ferment. Milk kefir is simple fermented milk, similar to drinking yoghurt.  Using the freshest milk possible is important here, however your milk kefir will still ferment with older milk.
    Be sure to give your jar a wash and good dry beforehand, but don’t be too caught up in making a very sterile environment.
  • Fermented carrots

    Fermented carrots
    ImageBy Sharon FlynnAbstract Giving a child, or yourself, a fermented carrot stick to snack on is so many levels up on a regular carrot in flavour, and of course in nutritional value. This is fast slow food ready to grab and eat at any time.  Peel and cut the carrots into rounds or sticks, depending on how you’d like to snack on them. I like rounds because they are bite-sized and perfect for munching on while I’m at the computer or watching TV. Sticks are great for dipping and a
  • Khetayee

    Khetayee
    ImageBy Farida AyubiAbstract These traditional sweet biscuits are usually made during Eid celebrations in Afghanistan. During my parents’ time there, people bought these from the local bakeries called kulchah feroshees, which used age-old techniques, and had special ovens to bake biscuits and pastries to perfection.
  • Kabuli palaw (rice with carrots and sultanas)

    Kabuli palaw (rice with carrots and sultanas)
    ImageBy Farida AyubiAbstract This beautiful and balanced rice is Afghanistan’s national dish. Pieces of lamb or chicken are usually buried beneath the rice, with the stock from the meat used to flavour it. In a time before the convenience of julienne slicers and shop-bought peeled and slivered nuts, kabuli palaw was time-consuming and elaborate to prepare, and was reserved primarily for ceremonial events. These days, although it takes less time to make, it still commands reverence. The del
  • Falooda

    Falooda
    ImageBy Farida AyubiAbstract This milky rosewater-infused cold dessert is popular in the subcontinent. It is served in a tall glass, with layers of rose syrup, pieces of maghoot jelly, icecream, milk and nuts. In Afghanistan, falooda is sold in small, colourfully decorated ice-cream shops known as shir yakh feroshees.
    This recipe has several different components – rose syrup, soaked basil seeds and maghoot jelly – which are all made separately and assembled together to make falooda.
  • Banjaan borani (braised eggplant with yoghurt dressing)

    Banjaan borani (braised eggplant with yoghurt dressing)
    ImageBy Farida AyubiAbstract Its popularity arises perhaps from the overall balance of textures and flavours – soft, melt-in-the-mouth eggplant, simmered in a slightly acidic tomato base, topped with a tangy, cooling yoghurt dressing. My mother recalls that in Afghanistan, banjaan borani was a favourite during the summer, when eggplants were in peak season.
    That this dish has endured to become a favourite in Australia, speaks to the resonance of the human spirit across seemingly disparate
  • Halloween Pretzel Fingers

    Looking for Halloween inspo?
    Pretzel fingers with almond nut nails. Look no further.An Australian recipe website gave us exactly what we needed, a ‘German-Style’ pretzel: allrecipes.com.au Pretzel FingersThese are big, soft pretzels rolled in coarse sea salt that you can make at home with basic bread ingredients you probably already have! Recipe from allrecipes.com.au with a couple of minor changes.CourseExtrasServings8 Prep Time90 minutesCook Time10 minutesIngredients1 ¼tsp d
  • Charcoal-infused flatbread (hawawshi)

    Charcoal-infused flatbread (hawawshi)
    ImageBy Nihal AbedAbstract Channel the streets of Egypt with this spiced mince flatbread. The smoky effect is easy to achieve – and doesn't require a coal-filled barbecue. Busy Cairo locals line up for this flatbread. The aroma of spicy meat and charcoal-kissed dough lures everyone to the street cart. It’s traditionally made with beef mince, but this lamb variation guarantees a juicy filling every time. You can recreate this laneway snack at home without a barbecue.
  • Skordalia: purple-skinned white sweet potato and garlic mash

    Skordalia: purple-skinned white sweet potato and garlic mash
    ImageBy Catherine ItsiopoulosAbstract this is a variation on the Greek potato dish skordalia, which goes perfectly well with fish, meatballs or baked vegetables (especially beetroot). sweet potato has a lower GI than potato and is better for people with diabetes. You can boil the sweet potatoes rather than roast them, but roasting will give the skordalia a richer flavour and creamier texture.
  • Pistachio and walnut baklava

    Pistachio and walnut baklava
    ImageBy Catherine ItsiopoulosAbstract A classic dessert of crushed nuts, thin filo pastry and honey, in this variation I’ve swapped out half the walnuts for pistachios and spiced it up with cinnamon, nutmeg and cloves
  • Baklava clusters

    Baklava clusters
    ImageBy Catherine ItsiopoulosAbstract This take on the baklava is made into delicious little clusters that can be eaten with yoghurt and fresh berries for a filling breakfast, or as a snack on their own.
  • Village-style sourdough bread

    Village-style sourdough bread
    ImageBy Catherine ItsiopoulosAbstract A gorgeous golden loaf of sourdough with a hint of honey and a sprinkle of sesame seeds with an easy cheat's sourdough starter.
  • Pork and fennel polpette

    Pork and fennel polpette
    ImageBy Catherine ItsiopoulosAbstract Fennel seeds have a sweet liquorice-like taste and are rich in anti-inflammatory nutrients. They go well with pork meatballs, and here I have also used some fennel bulb, which gives a softer flavour and moister meatball.
  • Yeung chi ka m lo (Sago with coconut, mango and pomelo)

    Yeung chi ka m lo (Sago with coconut, mango and pomelo)
    ImageBy ArChan ChanAbstract Served chilled, its popularity lies in just the right balance of flavours and textures – the soft, sweet mango, light coconut cream, chewy sago pearls and slightly bitter pomelo popping in the mouth. This refreshing mango soup was created by a Hong Kong chef in the 1980s. Hongkongers consider it a staple in the dessert world.
     
  • Tomato and egg stir-fry

    Tomato and egg stir-fry
    ImageBy ArChan ChanAbstract It can be tricky to achieve a good tomato flavour – you’re after a well-balanced sweet, savoury and tangy sauce to coat the fluffy eggs. When it is done well, it tastes great on a bed of steaming hot rice! I know tomato and egg might seem like an odd combination, but they go together so well in a stir-fry. Cheap, simple and full of nostalgia, this is a childhood dish that most Hong Kong mums cook at home
  • Steamed scallops with glass noodles

    Steamed scallops with glass noodles
    ImageBy ArChan ChanAbstract Bringing the clean fresh flavours of the ocean to the table, the scallops are flavoured with fried garlic and soy, and the noodles soak up all the delicious juices. This is simply the best way to eat scallops or razor clams, and is usually served as a starter.
  • Hong Kong-style poached chicken with sand ginger

    Hong Kong-style poached chicken with sand ginger
    ImageBy ArChan ChanAbstract This is another simple and clean-tasting way to prepare chicken, this time poached in a fragrant stock flavoured with sand ginger.
  • Camembosh hedgehog

    Camembosh hedgehog
    ImageBy Ian TheasbyHenry FirthAbstract This always generates big smiles in all who behold it! Big thanks to Ellie from Kinda Co (makers of incredible plant-based cheeses) for the original recipe, which we collaborated on together in the early days of BOSH! Tapioca flour is crucial for optimum gooeyness, so do seek some out. To get ahead, make the cheese the day before and keep it in the fridge.
  • Piri piri eazy chorizo bake

    Piri piri eazy chorizo bake
    ImageBy Henry FirthIan TheasbyAbstract This is a quick and easy to knock up, eat-the-rainbow ready revelation. Coloured heritage tomatoes are a great addition if you can get hold of them. The piri piri sauce is wonderful, so consider making double and keeping half for another recipe. Serve with brown rice for an even healthier meal. Once we’d developed the quick DIY chorizo recipe used here we never looked back. Hitting a standard shop-bought veggie sausage with fennel, paprika, red wine a
  • Piri piri 'chorizo 'bake

    Piri piri 'chorizo 'bake
    ImageBy Henry FirthIan TheasbyAbstract This is a quick and easy to knock up, eat-the-rainbow ready revelation. Coloured heritage tomatoes are a great addition if you can get hold of them. The piri piri sauce is wonderful, so consider making double and keeping half for another recipe. Serve with brown rice for an even healthier meal. Once we’d developed the quick DIY chorizo recipe used here we never looked back. Hitting a standard shop-bought veggie sausage with fennel, paprika, red wine a

Follow @CookingRecipeAU on Twitter!