• Pheasant and partridge classified as species that imperil UK wildlife

    Pheasant and partridge classified as species that imperil UK wildlife
    Shooting interests in England will need licence to release non-native birds near nature reservesPheasants and partridges are to be classified alongside Japanese knotweed and grey squirrels as species that imperil native wildlife, the government has announced. People with shooting interests in England will have to apply for a licence to release the non-native birds near nature reserves.The surprise announcement came after a legal challenge by the campaign group Wild Justice, which successfully ar
  • Coalition proposes to scrap recovery plans for 200 endangered species and habitats

    Coalition proposes to scrap recovery plans for 200 endangered species and habitats
    Environment groups decry protection ‘downgrade’ that would affect Tasmanian devil, whale shark and Kangaroo Island glossy-black cockatooGet our free news app; get our morning email briefingThe Morrison government has proposed scrapping recovery plans for almost 200 endangered species and habitats including the Tasmanian devil, the whale shark and the endangered glossy-black cockatoo populations on Kangaroo Island, one of the worst-affected areas in the 2019-20 bushfires.Environment g
  • Mother of boy killed by dog made ‘serious error of judgment’, says coroner

    Mother of boy killed by dog made ‘serious error of judgment’, says coroner
    Inquest into Frankie MacRitchie’s death recommends more ‘robust system’ to ensure police deal with dangerous dogsA coroner is to write to a police force over the tragedy of a nine-year-old boy mauled to death by a dog during a Cornish holiday, after his inquest heard the animal had been involved in previous attacks.Frankie MacRitchie was killed after being left alone in a caravan with the 45kg dog, an American bulldog crossed with a staffordshire bull terrier called Winston. Co
  • Dog that killed boy in Cornwall had attacked before, inquest hears

    Dog that killed boy in Cornwall had attacked before, inquest hears
    Coroner to write to police about death of Frankie MacRitchie, 9, while on holiday in 2019A coroner is to write to a police force about a nine-year-old boy who was mauled to death by a dog during a Cornish holiday, after his inquest heard the animal had been involved in previous attacks.Frankie MacRitchie was killed after being left alone in a caravan with the 45kg dog, called Winston, an American bulldog crossed with a staffordshire bull terrier. Continue reading...
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  • ‘It was complete pandemonium’: the towns grappling with bear attacks

    ‘It was complete pandemonium’: the towns grappling with bear attacks
    You’re more likely to be killed by lightning than a grizzly bear. But as humans encroach on bear territory, tensions riseThe grizzly bear had already poked around the camping site before being shooed away, but this time it wasn’t to be deterred. After it caught the waft of stashed food in its nostrils, the bear tore into the tent’s canvas.The outcome was grim. Leah Davis Lokan, a 65-year-old described posthumously as “incredibly strong, incredibly athletic, brave, fearles
  • Humans are encroaching on grizzly territory. Can we live together?

    Humans are encroaching on grizzly territory. Can we live together?
    The bears have returned from the brink of extinction, and now conservationists must persuade people to respect themThe grizzly bear had already poked around the camping site before being shooed away, but this time it wasn’t to be deterred. After it caught the waft of stashed food in its nostrils, the bear tore into the tent’s canvas.The outcome was grim. Leah Davis Lokan, a 65-year-old described posthumously as “incredibly strong, incredibly athletic, brave, fearless” lay
  • ‘Overwhelming’: hundreds of migrating birds die after crashing into NYC glass towers

    ‘Overwhelming’: hundreds of migrating birds die after crashing into NYC glass towers
    A volunteer with the New York City Audubon found nearly 300 carcasses littering the sidewalks below the World Trade CenterHundreds of birds migrating through New York City this week died after crashing into the city’s glass towers, a mass casualty event spotlighted by a New York City Audubon volunteer’s tweets showing the World Trade Center littered with bird carcasses.This week’s avian death toll was particularly high, but bird strikes on Manhattan skyscrapers are a persistent
  • ​Fossilised long-legged giant penguin identified as new species

    ​Fossilised long-legged giant penguin identified as new species
    Skeleton found by children in New Zealand helps fill in gaps in natural historyIn January 2006 a group of children in summer camp in Waikato, New Zealand, went on a fossil-hunting field trip with a seasoned archaeologist. They kayaked to the upper Kawhia harbour, a hotspot for this sort of activity, and they expected to find fossils of shellfish and the like, as they regularly did on these Hamilton junior naturalist club expeditions.But on this day, just before heading home, close to where they&
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  • Country diary: vignettes of life across the moor

    Country diary: vignettes of life across the moor
    Bodmin Moor, Cornwall: A walk through reveals past and present pursuits of man, and creatures both wild and tameIn late summer warmth, sheep lie in the shade of stunted hawthorns. Others meander past dried-up hollows, granite moorstone covered in sun-crisped lichens and stonecrop, and coarse grasses and prickly gorse, towards favoured turf around the ancient circle of Nine Stones.Prehistoric remains on this eastern side of the moor hint at the importance of this quiet, airy upland for early farm
  • Jaws made us scared of sharks but is a lack of sharks scarier? – podcast

    Jaws made us scared of sharks but is a lack of sharks scarier? – podcast
    Last week, the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) world conservation congress took place in Marseille. Guardian biodiversity reporter Phoebe Weston was there and heard about the latest updated ‘red list’ of threatened species, which included a warning that over a third of all shark and ray species now face extinction.To find out more, Anand Jagatia spoke to Phoebe about the findings and what they mean for the fate of sharks, rays and the ecosystems they inhabit
  • Kansas boy’s insect entry at state fair wins prize – and triggers federal inquiry

    Kansas boy’s insect entry at state fair wins prize – and triggers federal inquiry
    Creature was a dead spotted lanternfly – an invasive moth-like bug that has been causing massive damage to plants in eastern statesA young contestant’s proud entry at the Kansas state fair caused a flap when a judge saw the specimen submitted in the boy’s exhibition box – and it prompted a federal investigation.The show item was a dead spotted lanternfly the boy had discovered at his home – an invasive moth-like bug that has been causing massive damage to plants in
  • Horror at the Faroes dolphin slaughter is only human – but it risks hypocrisy | Philip Hoare

    Horror at the Faroes dolphin slaughter is only human – but it risks hypocrisy | Philip Hoare
    Our response to a mass cetacean hunt reveals man’s duplicitous attitudes to animalsWitnessing the mass movement of wild animals can seem to be a rebuttal of the disastrous news we hear, daily, of our natural environment. We know they are threatened, in their very choreography, but in the sight of them, the eternal optimism of the human spirit is encouraged to think that all is not lost.In the past few days we’ve seen moving stories of massed southern right whales feeding off New Sout
  • Milk enabled massive steppe migration

    The long-distance migrations of early Bronze Age pastoralists in the Eurasian steppe have captured widespread interest. But the factors behind their remarkable spread have been heavily debated by archaeologists. Now a new study provides clues regarding a critical component of the herders' lifestyle that was likely instrumental to their success: dairying.
  • Authorities catch 500lb alligator believed to have eaten Louisiana man

    Authorities catch 500lb alligator believed to have eaten Louisiana man
    12ft-long alligator captured with what appeared to be human remains in his stomach, after a 71-year-old man went missingA 12ft-long, 504lb alligator believed to have attacked and killed a 71-year-old Louisiana man in Hurricane Ida’s aftermath was captured with what appeared to be human remains in its stomach, local authorities said.Timothy Satterlee Sr vanished on 30 August, while checking on the contents of a shed at his home in Slidell, Louisiana, as flood waters engulfed the area. Conti
  • ‘Whoop’ – new autonomous method precisely detects endangered whale vocalizations

    One of the frequently used methods to monitor endangered whales is called passive acoustics technology, which doesn't always perform well. In the increasingly noisy ocean, current methods can mistake other sounds for whale calls. This high 'false positive' rate hampers scientific research and hinders conservation efforts. Researchers used artificial intelligence and machine learning methods to develop a new and much more accurate method of detecting Right whale up-calls -- a short 'whoop' sound
  • Roads have far-reaching impact on chimpanzees

    Roads have a negative impact on chimpanzee populations that can extend for more than 17 km, new research shows.
  • A flying great white shark: Chris Fallows’ best photograph

    A flying great white shark: Chris Fallows’ best photograph
    ‘Adolescent great whites lurk in the depths waiting for seals. Then they launch themselves at the surface – and their sheer power takes them clear of the water’There is no more iconic species on the planet than the great white shark. Everybody knows what they are, even in the most landlocked countries on Earth, and people are fascinated by them. The great white sharks at Seal Island, a few miles across the water from False Bay near Cape Town, use a surface hunting technique cal
  • Show Me the Honey: amateur beekeepers to compete in BBC show

    Show Me the Honey: amateur beekeepers to compete in BBC show
    Exclusive: seven-part TV series will involve weekly challenges and aims to tap into rising interest in apiariesIt has made The Great British Sewing Bee and spelling bee series Hard Spell but now the BBC is focusing on actual bees – by launching the UK’s first competitive beekeeping TV show. Show Me the Honey! features five children and their families taking part in a series of weekly challenges to create the best hive and tastiest honey, with the winner taking home the beekeeper of t
  • ‘Rainbow colours and legs for days’: Australian fly species named after drag star RuPaul

    ‘Rainbow colours and legs for days’: Australian fly species named after drag star RuPaul
    CSIRO entomologist Bryan Lessard says the soldier flies look like ‘little gems buzzing around the forest floor’Get our free news app; get our morning email briefingThe first insect Bryan Lessard named after a pop culture icon was the Beyoncé fly – Scaptia beyonceae, in 2011.At the time, the CSIRO entomologist caused quite a stir, and was “frowned upon” by some taxonomists.Sign up to receive an email with the top stories from Guardian Australia every morning C
  • Country diary: the unbroken blue sky ushers in a day full of promise

    Country diary: the unbroken blue sky ushers in a day full of promise
    St John’s Chapel, County Durham: The Weardale agricultural show returns after a Covid-enforced breakDays like this, with unbroken blue sky and not even the faintest whisper of wind, are rare on Chapel Fell. It is so quiet: the only sounds we can hear are trickling spring water and our own laboured breath, after the uphill hike along Harthope burn.Summer is almost over, yet down in the valley there is no hint of autumn. Meadows surrounding farmsteads in the upper dale have regained their lu
  • Indigenous rangers to use SpaceCows program to protect sacred sites and rock art from feral herds

    Indigenous rangers to use SpaceCows program to protect sacred sites and rock art from feral herds
    New space technology will allow traditional owners to predict where cattle and buffalo are going and cull them or fence off important sitesGet our free news app; get our morning email briefingFeral herds rubbing off rock art, trampling sacred ceremonial sites and destroying culturally significant waterways will be tackled with new space technology.Balnggarrawarra ranger and Cape York’s Normanby Station traditional owner Vince Harrigan said existing technology allowed rangers to track feral
  • Outcry over killing of almost 1,500 dolphins on Faroe Islands

    Outcry over killing of almost 1,500 dolphins on Faroe Islands
    Many Faroese horrified by what Sea Shepherd group claims was largest such massacre in the islands’ history• Story contains graphic image that some may find distressing.Even the staunchest defenders of traditional whaling in the Faroe Islands have condemned the “cruel and unnecessary” massacre on Sunday of a superpod of nearly 1,500 dolphins, which were driven into shallow waters of the Skálabotnur beach on the island of Eysturoy and left writhing for hours before be
  • Modern snakes evolved from a few survivors of dino-killing asteroid

    A new study suggests that all living snakes evolved from a handful of species that survived the giant asteroid impact that wiped out the dinosaurs and most other living things at the end of the Cretaceous. The authors say that this devastating extinction event was a form of 'creative destruction' that allowed snakes to diversify into new niches, previously filled by their competitors.
  • Species in polar regions hard hit by climate change

    Many species will become extinct as a consequence of global warming. This is the prediction of a mathematical model. The simulations show that climate change will have a particularly large impact on ecosystems in polar regions, mirroring changes that can already be seen in the natural world.
  • Butterflies released in Finland contained parasitic wasps – with more wasps inside

    Butterflies released in Finland contained parasitic wasps – with more wasps inside
    Introduction of Glanville fritillary leads to emergence of three new species on to Baltic Sea islandWhen caterpillars of a beautiful butterfly were introduced on to the tiny island of Sottunga in the Åland archipelago, scientists hoped to study how the emerging butterflies would disperse across the landscape.But researchers did not realise that their introduction of the Glanville fritillary (Melitaea cinxia) led to the emergence of three other species on to the Baltic Sea island, which spr
  • Animals farmed: BSE in Brazil, UK pork crisis and radical Dutch plan to cut livestock numbers

    Animals farmed: BSE in Brazil, UK pork crisis and radical Dutch plan to cut livestock numbers
    Welcome to our monthly roundup of the biggest issues in farming and food production, with must-read reports from around the webBrazil has confirmed two cases of BSE, or mad cow disease, and has suspended beef exports to China. Ireland, a smaller beef supplier to China, reported a case of mad cow disease in May last year, but has not yet been able to resume exports. However, the Brazilian ban is not expected to last for long, with Brazil accounting for 40% of China’s beef imports.
    Greenhous
  • Rewriting extinction: Ricky Gervais joins celebrities creating comics to save species

    Rewriting extinction: Ricky Gervais joins celebrities creating comics to save species
    Paul McCartney and Cara Delevingne also collaborate on picture stories to highlight species and ecosystem loss and fund projectsRicky Gervais is the latest celebrity to join an ambitious year-long storytelling campaign called Rewriting Extinction with the launch of a comic called Bullfight.Since it launched in June, more than 300 celebrities, environmental experts and storytellers have collaborated to design more than 150 comics that tackle issues such as deforestation and overconsumption. Actor
  • Country diary: clouds of chattering sand martins swirl above our heads

    Country diary: clouds of chattering sand martins swirl above our heads
    Pagham Harbour, West Sussex: It is thought that seven pairs of cattle egrets have nested and at least 10 young have fledged hereWe walk in single file along the narrow path that runs along the bank, overlooking the harbour. It’s not the first time that our local RSPB group has met for a walk in the last six months, but there’s a sense of revived camaraderie as we catch up with the latest news and point out birds and butterflies to one another.To the south, glinting in the low evening
  • Contents of Karl Lagerfeld’s eight houses up for grabs at Sotheby’s

    Contents of Karl Lagerfeld’s eight houses up for grabs at Sotheby’s
    Bowls used by world’s most spoilt cat among the more than 1,000 lots that belonged to late fashion designerDishes used to feed one of the world’s most pampered cats and hundreds of pairs of fingerless gloves will be among more than 1,000 lots at eight auctions selling the collection of Karl Lagerfeld, Sotheby’s has announced.The auction house announced earlier this year that it would sell the vast and varied number of objects that the late fashion designer accumulated to fill h
  • Squirrels have human-like personality traits, says study

    Squirrels have human-like personality traits, says study
    University of California, Davis study claims to be the first to document personality in golden-mantled ground squirrelsAnimal researchers in California have discovered human-like personality traits in squirrels that anybody watching one raiding nuts from a bird table could probably have guessed: they are bold, aggressive, athletic and sociable.The study from University of California, Davis, and published this month in Animal Behavior, claims to be the first to document personality in golden-mant

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