• India's Hindu Extremists Calling for Genocide Against Muslims

    Source: CNN - Top StoriesAt a conference in India last month, a Hindu extremist dressed head-to-toe in the religion's holy color, saffron, called on her supporters to kill Muslims and "protect" the country. "If 100 of us become soldiers and are prepared to kill 2 million (Muslims), then we will win... protect India, and make it a Hindu nation," said Pooja Shakun Pandey, a senior member of the right-wing Hindu Mahasabha political party, according to a video of the event.
  • ‘I’ve got this little extra strength’: the rare, intense world of a super smeller

    ‘I’ve got this little extra strength’: the rare, intense world of a super smeller
    From petrol and perfume to Parkinson’s disease, super-smellers can detect scents others are oblivious to. For Krati Garg, the ability’s both power and painA few years ago Dr Krati Garg, an oral and maxillofacial surgeon in Melbourne, was in theatre about to commence work on a patient when she told the anaesthetist she could smell sevoflurane.Sevoflurane is the anaesthetic gas used to put – and keep – patients asleep during surgery. Ingested via a tube that is placed down
  • Darling buds: how best friends keep us healthy and happy

    Darling buds: how best friends keep us healthy and happy
    Strong social networks have been shown to improve wellbeing, but what are the extra perks of having a really close friend? And why are women more likely to have one?“We met when we were five. I don’t know how I would have managed without her.” As children, Barbara Kastelein, from Ashford in Kent, and her best friend, nicknamed “Tulip”, both had alcoholic fathers. Their friendship was an escape from unhappy homes.The best friends are now both 55 and their relationshi
  • I’ve seen everything as a counsellor. But Couples Therapy still has me gripped

    I’ve seen everything as a counsellor. But Couples Therapy still has me gripped
    Most people want their sessions to remain private, but a new TV show that lifts the lid on the process is compelling – and rewardingTwo weeks ago, as 2021 turned into 2022, my inbox was suddenly full of couples requesting counselling. It wasn’t that surprising because every year after Christmas, many couples have a meltdown. It’s the fatal combination of forced Christmas jollity and endless hours spent together that makes people realise they don’t know if they like or get
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  • Thich Nhat Hanh, Poetic Peace Activist and Master of Mindfulness, Dies at 95

    Source: U.S. News and World ReportThich Nhat Hanh, the Zen Buddhist monk, poet, and peace activist who rose to fame as an opponent of the Vietnam War, died at 95 Saturday surrounded by followers in a temple where his spiritual journey began. Nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize by Martin Luther King, who called him "an apostle of peace," Nhat Hanh published more than 100 books, including the 2021 volume "Zen and the Art of Saving the Planet" on mindfulness and environmental...
  • Every parent I know is worried about their child’s anxiety. Here’s what 25 years of teaching has shown me | Tegan Bennett Daylight

    Every parent I know is worried about their child’s anxiety. Here’s what 25 years of teaching has shown me | Tegan Bennett Daylight
    My years teaching in universities – and my own children – have changed my attitude to the storm of disability our young people faceI’ve been teaching at Australian universities for 25 years now. I began when I was 27 – I’m now 52. This means I’ve been next to university students since 1996, and if you’re curious about these things, you see patterns begin to emerge.Every parent, every aunt or uncle, every grandparent, and in fact anyone who has anything t
  • Mixed messages? How end of Covid plan B rules could change behaviour

    Mixed messages? How end of Covid plan B rules could change behaviour
    Analysis: Experts say when the rules are relaxed there tends to be a gradual erosion of protective behavioursAll plan B measures in England will be lifted next week, meaning an end to compulsory mask-wearing in shops, vaccine certificates for entering venues, and guidance to work from home. But are the public ready to embrace these freedoms just weeks after Covid cases in the UK hit a record high and with daily deaths higher now than when the measures were introduced?Some are likely to feel more
  • Mixed messages? How end of Covid plan B could change behaviour in England

    Mixed messages? How end of Covid plan B could change behaviour in England
    Analysis: Experts say when the rules are relaxed there tends to be a gradual erosion of protective behavioursAll plan B measures in England will be lifted next week, meaning an end to compulsory mask-wearing in shops, vaccine certificates for entering venues, and guidance to work from home. But are the public ready to embrace these freedoms just weeks after Covid cases in the UK hit a record high and with daily deaths higher now than when the measures were introduced?Some are likely to feel more
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  • Climate Change Denial on Facebook, Youtube, and Tiktok "Bad As Ever"

    Source: USA Today - TechnologyThe climate is changing, but misinformation about it on major social media platforms is not. Climate change falsehoods, hoaxes, and conspiracy theories still abound on Twitter, Facebook, TikTok, and YouTube despite pledges to crack down, a new report says. Social media posts and videos denying climate change, disputing its causes, or underplaying its effects are not only common but often lack warning labels or links to credible information, says...
  • Americans' Pandemic Worries Higher Than Before Vaccines Widely Available

    Source: USA Today - U.S. NewsA new poll shows Americans' fears about COVID-19 are up as cases skyrocketed in January, prompting most Americans to avoid large crowds even as masking and vaccine rates remain mostly stagnant. The poll was conducted online by Gallup January 3 through 14. "Worry has jumped ... and is now the highest it has been since last winter, before COVID-19 vaccines were readily available to the general public," a summary of poll results says.
  • French Parliament Condemns Chinese "Genocide" Against Uyghurs

    Source: U.S. News and World ReportFrance's parliament passed a motion asking the government to condemn China for "crimes against humanity and genocide" against its Uyghur Muslim minority and to take foreign policy measures to make this stop. The non-binding motion was adopted with 169 votes for and one vote against. Activists and U.N. human rights experts say that at least 1 million Muslims are being detained in camps in the remote western region of Xinjiang.
  • U.S. Launches Civil Rights Probe on LGBTQ Dating Ban at Religious School

    Source: U.S. News and World ReportThe U.S. Department of Education has opened a civil-rights investigation into how LGBTQ students are disciplined at Brigham Young University, a private religious school. The complaint under investigation came after the school said it would enforce a ban on same-sex dating and punished students for holding hands or kissing someone of the same sex, harsher discipline than that faced by heterosexual couples.
  • Six Strategies for Aging Successfully

    Source: U.S. News and World ReportWhile some physical and mental decline is inevitable with advancing age, research suggests such degradation isn’t as severe as previously thought, says Jennifer Ailshire, an associate professor of gerontology at the Leonard Davis School of Gerontology at the University of Southern California. Studies have found that certain strategies for aging well can help increase your health span as long as your life span.
  • Doomsday Clock 100 Seconds to Midnight; World Seems "Stuck"

    Source: USA Today - U.S. NewsIt's still only 100 seconds to midnight. Ongoing nuclear risks, the threat of climate change, disruptive technologies, and the seemingly endless coronavirus pandemic have brought us as close to doomsday as we've ever been, according to the annual Doomsday Clock announcement made Thursday in Washington, D.C. This is the same time as last year—closer to destruction than at any point since the clock was created in 1947.
  • At 113, NAACP Evolves for Relevance on Racial Justice Agenda

    Source: U.S. News and World ReportAs the NAACP turns 113, look for its voice to grow louder on issues like climate change, the student debt crisis, and the COVID pandemic—while keeping voting rights and criminal justice reform at the forefront of its priorities. The oldest U.S. civil rights organization's birthday next month comes as it undergoes a restructuring to reflect a younger membership and leadership, so it is adding endeavors like producing streamed content for CBS TV.
  • U.N. Defines Holocaust Denial, Urges Social Media Firms to Fight It

    Source: BBC News - EuropeThe United Nations has adopted a resolution aimed at combating Holocaust denial and is urging member states and social media firms to help fight anti-Semitism. The resolution, put forward by Israel and Germany, was passed without a vote by the 193-member General Assembly. The move sends "a strong... message against the denial or the distortion of these historical facts", the UN said. Six million Jewish people died in the Holocaust.
  • How Do Tic Disorders Develop, and How Can They Be Treated?

    Source: Science Daily - Top HealthA team of researchers has identified a neural network which is responsible for generating tic disorders. Targeting of this network via deep brain stimulation delivered by a pacemaker-like device has resulted in the alleviation of symptoms in people with Tourette syndrome. The researchers' findings could serve as a basis for improving the treatment of people with severe tic disorders.
  • Doctor Hopes Photo Breaks "Rampant Stigma" of Physicians Seeking Help

    Source: APA PsycPORT™: Psychology NewswireWearing blue scrubs and balancing a pill on his tongue, Dr. Jake Goodman took a selfie he knew could have consequences for his career. Goodman decided to open up about his own mental health by posting the photo on Instagram last month, receiving thousands of likes and hundreds of comments. Studies show 27% of medical students and 29% of resident physicians have symptoms of depression, but many doctors are reluctant to get treatment.
  • How School Closures Can Harm Kids' Mental and Physical Health

    Source: CNN - Top StoriesNearly 3,500 schools across the United States are not offering in-person learning. Now, research published Tuesday in JAMA Pediatrics shows how school closures are affecting children worldwide. The study looked at children and adolescents from 11 countries, including Bangladesh, Brazil, Canada, China, India, Italy, Japan, Spain, Turkey, the U.K., and the U.S. Closures were linked to anxiety, depression, lower physical activity, and food...
  • NCAA Adopts New Policy for Transgender Athletes

    Source: U.S. News and World ReportThe NCAA has adopted a sport-by-sport approach for transgender athletes, bringing the organization in line with the U.S. and International Olympic Committees. Under the new guidelines, approved by the NCAA Board of Governors on Wednesday, transgender participation for each sport will be determined by the policy for the sport's national governing body, subject to review and recommendation by an NCAA committee.
  • Indigenous Woman to Lead Smithsonian American Indian Museum

    Source: U.S. News and World ReportAn indigenous New Mexico woman has been named to lead the Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian. Cynthia Chavez Lamar will be the first Native American woman to serve as the museum's director when she takes over on February 14. The museum has one of the largest collections of native and indigenous items in the world, including more than 1 million objects and photographs and more than 500,000 digitized images, films, and other...
  • Few Countries Offer a Good Place to Die, Researchers Say

    Source: Science Daily - Top SocietyCOVID-19 has shown us images of patients dying in isolation, apart from loved ones during their final moments. But even before the pandemic, harrowing deaths were all too common in most parts of the world, a new survey of end-of-life care shows. The study ranked 81 countries on how well their health systems provide for the physical and mental wellbeing of patients at the end of life. Only six countries earned an A grade, while 36 earned Ds or Fs.
  • How Film Is Putting Indigenous Languages in the Spotlight

    Source: CNN - Top StoriesOn its face, "Sooyii" is a story of resilience in the face of unimaginable loss. The independent film, directed by Krisztian Kery, centers on a young Blackfoot man in the 1700s who sees his people decimated by smallpox after the arrival of European settlers in the Great Plains. But as much as "Sooyii" is a story about the loss that comes with deadly disease and ethnic conflict, it's also a cinematic record of an endangered tongue.
  • Cerebrospinal Fluid Offers Clues to Post-COVID "Brain Fog"

    Source: Science Daily - Top HealthSome patients who develop cognitive impairment after a mild bout of COVID have abnormalities in their cerebrospinal fluid similar to those found in people with other infectious diseases. The finding may provide insights into how SARS-CoV-2 impacts the brain. "Brain fog" is a common after-effect of COVID, affecting some 67 percent of 156 patients at a post-COVID clinic in New York, a study published this month found.
  • Easy wins: better than a warm cup of milk, read for six minutes before bed for good sleep

    Easy wins: better than a warm cup of milk, read for six minutes before bed for good sleep
    Committing to six minutes of reading a night before bed sounds easy – and it is. Not only can it improve sleep and reduce stress, but you’ll be better read tooWe’re all on a never-ending pursuit to perfect the art of good shuteye. Theories abound, so it is easy to find yourself in a maze of advice, mindfulness techniques and mum’s advice about the magic of a cup of warm milk at night.But one tactic I found ticked all my boxes: reading for just six minutes before you go to
  • ‘It’s awful to be a medical exception’: the woman who cannot forget

    ‘It’s awful to be a medical exception’: the woman who cannot forget
    Rebecca Sharrock is one of a handful of people worldwide with highly superior autobiographical memory. But remembering minute details of your own life has its downsidesEvery morning since January 2004, Rebecca Sharrock crosses off the date on a calendar in her room. Like many people, the 31-year-old uses it to keep track of time, distinguishing the present day from the ones that came before.Unlike many, Sharrock can remember what happened on specific days five, 10, 15 years ago. Continue reading
  • I study crowds – that’s why I know the police and crime bill will make us less safe | Stephen Reicher

    I study crowds – that’s why I know the police and crime bill will make us less safe | Stephen Reicher
    Priti Patel’s crackdown on peaceful protesters ignores all the evidence about how to handle large demonstrationsOn the first day of 2022 – the hottest New Year’s Day on record – Priti Patel announced that cracking down on eco protesters would be one of her priorities for the year.It wasn’t simply rhetoric. The police, crime, sentencing and courts bill for England and Wales being debated in parliament provides the police with a dramatic extension to their powers to s
  • On Doing What We KNOW is Good for Us

    On Doing What We KNOW is Good for Us
    By Yashi Srivastava -
    Have you ever repeatedly snoozed your alarm in the morning even though you were the one who set it to get up early and exercise? Have you ever tried to build a meditation habit and failed? Have you ever said something harsh in the heat of the moment and later wished you had behaved differently?On the one hand, it may seem that we’re all in-charge of ourselves. If someone asks me to raise my right hand and touch my nose, I can do so at will. Most people can. On the oth
  • Mexican Soccer Officials to Ban Fans for Uttering Anti-Gay Chant at Matches

    Source: United Press International - Health NewsMexican Football Federation President Yon de Luisa said on Monday that the federation will start issuing five-year stadium bans to fans found to have made an anti-gay chant that has become popular at matches there. The federation has faced the wrath of the international soccer organization FIFA—including fines and banning games from certain stadiums—because of the chant. The new rules will apply starting January 30.
  • London Mayor Plans Pay-Per-Mile Charge for Drivers

    Source: BBC News - UK NewsLondon's mayor, Sadiq Khan, says he needs to charge drivers a daily fee of up to £2 for "all but the cleanest vehicles" to help reach climate change targets. The fee is part of an effort to promote public transport, walking, cycling, or electric vehicles. Mr. Khan said he was "not willing to put off action," and that longer term, he will need to implement a pay-per-mile system. London reported needs to reduce traffic 27% by 2030 to meet its...

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