• Citizen Green: Truth and fiction in Trump’s promises to the ‘forgotten’

    “The forgotten men and women of our country will be forgotten no longer,” President Trump pledged during his inauguration speech.
    Americans want “great schools for their children, safe neighborhoods for their families, and good jobs for themselves,” Trump said, adding that too many live a different reality.
    The litany that followed gave first mention to “mothers and children trapped in poverty in our inner cities,” followed by a nod to his primary constituenc
  • Locals join voices with others Updated at

    Randolph County residents took part in the Women's March on Washington Saturday as well as the Triad N.C. Women's March, a sister march organized in Greensboro. Many of the reasons they decided to march dovetailed with the mission statement of the official website, womensmarch.com: "We stand together in solidarity with our partners and children for the protection of our rights, our safety, our health and our families - recognizing that our vibrant and diverse communities are the strength of our
  • WKML/Fayetteville, NC, Names Randy Bliss OM, PD

    BEASLEY MEDIA GROUP/FAYETTEVILLE, NC has tapped RANDY BLISS as OM for its five-station cluster, which includes Country WKML, AC WAZZ, Urban WZFX, Urban AC WUKS, and Adult Hits WFLB. BLISS will also serve as PD/afternoons for WKML and PD for WAZZ.
  • Irby Named Triangle Area Executive at First Citizens Bank

    First Citizens Bank has named Jay Irby as its Triangle area executive. Most recently, he served as the bank's Triangle area manager of business banking.
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  • The Weekender: The Inauguration Edition

    However you expect to face Friday’s inauguration and all the stormy days to follow, never forget that there’s plenty happening here in the Triad. Use these events to get to know new people in your community and appreciate the diversity and energy unique to the area we call home.
    THURSDAY
    Community coloring @ the Creative Center (GSO), 6:30 p.m.
    This free event encourages an ongoing, community experience as well as personal creative exploration. Bring coloring supplies, a snack and a
  • Remains of missing New Jersey man found in North Carolina

    Greensboro police spokesman Susan C. Danielsen said in a news release Wednesday that the body of 24-year-old Bangaly Fofana, of East Orange, New Jersey, was discovered Monday behind a vacant building. Danielsen says the state Medical Examiners' Office also determined the manner of death was homicide.
  • Obama should commute Jorge Cornell’s sentence, too

    I know that it’s a long shot.
    I know that thousands of prisoners are seeking commutations in their sentences from the departing president, and I know there isn’t as much political will to free Jorge Cornell as some of the other contenders.
    But with the announcement that more than 270 people were pardoned or had their sentences commuted by President Barack Obama yesterday, including Chelsea Manning and Oscar Lopez Rivera, I’m reminded again of the audacity of hoping and that in
  • Group to demand documents in police misconduct investigation

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  • Who owns the ghetto in High Point?

    The Singer sewing machine, fully functional with the exception of a missing belt, is a totem of hope in the anteroom of the spacious garment factory at the end of a downscale derelict shopping center on High Point’s East Green Drive.
    “I learned to sew on this machine as a child,” said Jerry Mingo, who started Jerry Mingo Design Work Room about a year ago as a nonprofit to provide jobs for ex-offenders and other people facing employment challenges in the poorest swath of this c
  • Visiting artist contends with mundanity

    Contradiction doesn’t normally appear in exhibit literature, much less represent an artist’s shifting perspective and the elaborate, enriched work that follows. But such might be the case for the newest installation in the Falk Gallery of UNCG’s Weatherspoon Art Museum.
    Entering the gallery, visitors first encounter the “Income’s Outcome” selections of Danica Phelps’ Hoping to Help exhibit. These line drawings display ordinary moments of Phelps’ l
  • Sportsball: Swarm sting State alum, sell out small stadium

    The Fieldhouse sold out for the Greensboro Swarm’s Jan. 13 home game against the Delaware 87ers, the awkwardly named D-League affiliate of the Philadelphia 76ers who nevertheless touted a respectable 12-9 record. While the tickets sales must encourage the team and the Charlotte Hornets’ decision to base their farm team in Tournament Town, the bummer remained: There was no way to get into the Friday-night game.
    Unless you had a connection.
    The weekend prior, I banked on attending the
  • Sound Ecology lays foundation for a scene’s growth

    Warm light radiated off the exposed brick of Kleur, a boutique in Winston-Salem’s Big Winston complex, as the small space filled with a veritable Sgt. Pepper’s-esque collage of the city’s musicians, artists, barkeeps and journalists — Laura Gardea, Danielle Bull, Eddie Garcia, Tori Elliott, Eric Swaim. A row of five figures sat patiently at a table along the wall: scene veteran Saylor Breckenridge, Estrangers drummer Drew Braden, Katelyn Allivato of the Genuine, Foxture
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  • Triatitude Adjustment: Name 10 records…

    I have a complicated relationship with Facebook. On the one hand, it allows me to stay connected with former classmates and colleagues, keeping me sort of ambiently aware of their successes or struggles. On the other, it also lets me know who just ate the best avocado toast.
    Facebook has grown increasingly complicated in the months since your neighbor with the “Still Crazy After All These Beers” window decal helped to elect Orange Julius Caesar. Even the most innocuous conversation
  • Triaditude Adjustment: Name 10 records…

    I have a complicated relationship with Facebook. On the one hand, it allows me to stay connected with former classmates and colleagues, keeping me sort of ambiently aware of their successes or struggles. On the other, it also lets me know who just ate the best avocado toast.
    Facebook has grown increasingly complicated in the months since your neighbor with the “Still Crazy After All These Beers” window decal helped to elect Orange Julius Caesar. Even the most innocuous conversation
  • Triad City Beat This Week: Jan. 18, 2017

    Senior Editor Jordan Green analyzes property ownership in the High Point ghetto, while exploring how poverty and racial segregation became concentrated in the core city and what the city might do to address it in a special investigative report in this week’s Triad City Beat.
    NEWS
    • Giant net sculpture at LeBauer Park comes down for winter
     
     
     
    OPINION
    • Editorial: Before the inauguration, a state of confusion
    • It Just Might Work: Blocking the Atlantic C
  • The Unpopular Opinion: Trump should keep his Twitter account

    I started following @realDonaldTrump on Twitter just about a week ago. I was quite late to the party; the president-elect has been tweeting since 2009, with a mouthy, brash style that has remained consistent over the years. And now, it’s pretty much the only thing I follow on Twitter.
    The archived stuff is — pardon the expression — golden: swipes at Arianna Huffington, boasts about his IQ, diatribes against “haters” and “losers,” an extended “trut
  • It Might Just Work: Blocking the Atlantic Coast Pipeline

    If constructed, the proposed Atlantic Coast Pipeline — transmitting highly pressurized natural gas (about 75 percent methane) — would run approximately 600 miles through West Virginia, Virginia and eight counties in eastern North Carolina.
    Methane is not only a far more powerful greenhouse gas than carbon dioxide; it’s explosive, too. Poorly maintained lines can scorch acres of land and endanger lives, as seen in last year’s pipeline explosion in Westmoreland County, Pa.
  • Editor’s Notebook: A deep investigative dive

    Like a lot of other great pieces of work, this week’s cover story had a long lead time.
    In 2015, Senior Editor Jordan Green identified the poorest Census tracts in the Triad. We weren’t sure what we were going to do with the information — High Point and Greensboro had just been named the worst cities for food insecurity in the nation, with Winston-Salem not far behind, and we’ve always been interested in income inequality, systemic poverty and the question of how things
  • Editorial: Before the inauguration, a state of confusion

    Sen. Richard Burr, acting in his capacity as chair of the Intelligence Committee, announced last week that he’d lead an investigation into ties between the Trump campaign and Russia.
    It’s a stunning first in US history: A probe into an elected president for connections with our most long-standing and powerful enemy, before he’s even inaugurated. The situation is so singular that we are not even sure how to articulate the accusation: Fraud? Treason? Conspiracy? Espionage?
    Perhap
  • Competition cometh for Camel City BBQ Factory’s ‘barcade’

    The smell is unmistakable: greasy, smoky pork pulling you by the nose into the front door Camel City BBQ Factory, but you’re on a mission. Follow the signs for the bar up the external stairway. The table service portion of the restaurant is here, too, and if you want to avoid the demon children running around, screaming and speaking strings of English like a scene from The Wicker Man, then it’s best to come after their bedtime.
    That should be no problem, considering the Winston-Sale
  • Citizen Green: A test of faith in investigative journalism

    It started as a simple question: Who owns the properties in the poorest areas of High Point?
    This question has vexed me since I started reporting on the Triad’s third largest city in 2008, but it quickly became more complicated. I had to understand how it became poor. Was the blight and substandard housing driven by a handful of bad landlords or by deeper structural challenges that prevent reinvestment? Do the landlords operate from out of state or do they live right in High Point?
    What w
  • Ex-Apprentice Slaps Trump With Lawsuit

    Summer Zervos, who accused Trump of groping her in 2007, is suing the President-elect for defamation after he claims they never met at his hotel. With three days to go before his inauguration , Donald Trump is being sued for defamation by a woman who accused him of sexually inappropriate conduct, according to attorney-to-the-stars Gloria Allred , who announced the lawsuit at a press conference this afternoon.
  • Tar Heel View: Expel unlawful speech codes at Unc campuses

    In his first month of work, an Appalachian State University administrator suggested students accused of "microaggressions" - fleeting and usually inadvertent comments perceived as prejudiced - could face consequences. Chief Diversity Officer Willie Fleming, who was hired last May, told The Watauga Democrat newspaper in a June interview that his goals included creating a "zero-tolerance policy" for so-called bias incidents.
  • Lance Allega | Under Armour

    Allega will be responsible for communicating Under Armour's growth strategy, financial performance, operating model, key business metrics and plans for building long-term shareholder value to investors, analysts and other external audiences. He will be based out of Under Armour's global headquarters in Baltimore and will start Jan. 23. Allega joins Under Armour after serving as head of investor relations and strategic accounts for VF Corporation based in Greensboro, North Carolina.
  • Golden LEAF Scholarships are available -

    Golden LEAF Scholarship awards, valued at $12,000 will be offered to first-time recipients attending a qualifying North Carolina campus for the 2017-18 academic year. The scholarships are funded by a grant from the Golden LEAF Foundation and are administered by the North Carolina State Education Assistance Authority.
  • The Arts Company Introduces Two New Artists To Tennessee

    The Arts Company introduces two artists new to Nashville-- Sculptor Roger Hall igan and Painter Jan Chenoweth. In their Nashville debut exhibitions.
  • Ramen pops up, sells out

    Chef Tim Grandinetti jokingly calls the Brooklyn-style ramen — with its chicken broth, chicken and crab cake — “hipster ramen.” After trying more than half the bowls on his pop-up menu, I’ll reluctantly concur with the title.
    Grandinetti, the chef behind Spring House and Quanto Basta just blocks from each other on the west side of downtown Winston-Salem, organized a weekly event series with Gwen Roach of Caldero Bone Broth and Winstead Farms. Using Roach’s br
  • Warehouse Manager

    Job Description Growing printing company seeking an experienced warehouse manager to join our team. Reporting directly to the operations manager, you will take full accountability for the management of day-to-day operations of the warehouse, as well as ongoing development of a medium-sized team.
  • Matthew Griffin Snags 2017 Crook's Corner Book Prize for His Graceful Novel, Hide

    Greensboro native Matthew Griffin has won the fourth-annual Crook's Corner Book Prize for a debut novel set in the South. Griffin, now based in New Orleans, attended the ceremony to accept the honor, which was selected by Tom Franklin, a novelist and writing professor at the University of Mississippi at Oxford.
  • Giant net sculpture at LeBauer Park comes down for winter

    The sculpture that once heralded the fulfillment of Greensboro’s new LeBauer Park has been put away for the winter.
    Artist Janet Echelman’s “Where We Met,” an immense project created from 35 miles of technical fibers and spanning 200 feet between 60-foot-tall masts, provided a vibrant sail to catch the wind of downtown revitalization.
    With a $1-million grant from the Edward M. Armfield Sr. Foundation leading the commission, the Community Foundation of Greater Greensboro&
  • Giant net at LeBauer Park comes down for winter

    The sculpture that once heralded the fulfillment of Greensboro’s new LeBauer Park has been put away for the winter.
    Artist Janet Echelman’s “Where We Met,” an immense project created from 35 miles of technical fibers and spanning 200 feet between 60-foot-tall masts, provided a vibrant sail to catch the wind of downtown revitalization.
    With a $1-million grant from the Edward M. Armfield Sr. Foundation leading the commission, the Community Foundation of Greater Greensboro&
  • Bill seeks $1.4 million for man wrongly imprisoned 33 years for 1982 rape and murder

    "You take your first car you ever have, you take your first girl friend, first kiss, first dog, first house, first child. You know how excited you are in that moment.
  • 'Extraordinary crowns' at Harrison Museum showcases Pulaski woman's hat collection

    "Extraordinary Crowns" is on display at the Harrison Museum of African American Culture, featuring hats worn by Pulaski resident Irma Jean Young-Smith.
  • Art, whimsy in the world of utilitarian iron on display in Williamsburg

    A new Colonial Williamsburg exhibit called "From Forge and Furnace: A Celebration of Early American Iron" uncovers surprising artfulness and whimsy in the world of 18th- and 19th-century wrought and cast iron. -- Mark St. John Erickson A new Colonial Williamsburg exhibit called "From Forge and Furnace: A Celebration of Early American Iron" uncovers surprising artfulness and whimsy in the world of 18th- and 19th-century wrought and cast iron.
  • Greensboro police charge jailed man in 2016 shooting death

    Greensboro police say a man jailed on larceny-related charges is now accused in connection with a shooting death last August. A statement from the Greensboro Police Department says 29-year-old Ismiles Geraude Williams was served with a first-degree murder warrant.
  • Careful Process To Preserve Documents

    Since 2008, Rockingham County Clerk of Court Chaz Haywood has sent countless books and documents to Dallas-based Kofile Inc., which specializes in restoration and has an office in Greensboro, N.C. Once the artifacts arrive in Greensboro, they are looked over by trained professionals, who decide the safest way to maintain their content, said John Tinsley, vice president of Caskie Graphics and dealer for Kofile. "It will make it a complete document if they have all the pieces," Tinsley of Lynchbur
  • Bee Safe Owner to Create Self-Storage Management Firm to Handle Company Growth

    Bee Safe Storage and Wine Cellar owner Roy E. Carroll II intends to create a property-management firm to handle the day-to-day operation of his growing self-storage business. Based in Greensboro, N.C., Bee Safe currently has three facilities in operation, but has 25 projects in various stages of development stretching from the Washington, D.C., area to Florida and into Texas, according to the source.
  • U.S. Marshals arrest Alamance County sex trafficking suspect

    A suspect in an Alamance County human trafficking case wanted by federal authorities for more than a year has finally been arrested. The U.S. Marshals Service reported that Carl Wayne Blackmon Jr., 33, was taken into custody on Thursday in Greensboro after authorities received a tip on his whereabouts.
  • Veteran presented with new mortgage-free house

    Operation Homefront and Wade Jurney Homes presented the home to US Army Captain Gary Mason and family at a special ceremony. The home is located in the Corbin Acres community off Newsome Road.
  • Career educator, Anson native, to speak at MLK celebration

    For the Record Dr. Harlie Leon Sturdivant will be the speaker at Burnsville Recreation and Learning Center in honor of Martin Luther King Jr. Day on Jan. 16. Harlie Leon Sturdivant of Greensboro - and native of the Ansonville community - is the invited speaker. He is the son of the late Rev.
  • See more

    On Feb. 1, 1960, four black college students took their seats in a Woolworth "dime store" in Greensboro, North Carolina, and non-verbally engaged in one of the most important strategies against injustice known to our culture. Ordering a cup of coffee at the all-white lunch counter was nothing less than insurgency.
  • ACS' Maness named 2016-17 Piedmont-Triad Region Principal of the Year

    Balfour Elementary School principal Jusmar Maness was named the 2017 Wells Fargo Principal of the Year for the Piedmont-Triad Region in a program sponsored by the N.C. Carolina Department of Public Instruction and Wells Fargo. The announcement came as a surprise to Maness and students and teachers at Balfour Elementary during Thursday's after-school academic activities.
  • Coaches move from sidelines to lunch lines

    Elon University head men's basketball coach Matt Matheny will fight cancer by making sandwiches from noon to 1 p.m. Monday at Subway, 112 Lebanon Ave., Elon. Four Triad head men's basketball coaches are taking part in Subway's Coaches vs. Cancer campaign, which runs through February.
  • 'Blessed and Delivered' Updated at

    Sharon Covington Shamburger, for all intents and purposes, appeared to be headed onto a path of greatness and success. It was a given that she would go onto college and have a great career in whatever field she chose.
  • The Weekender: Post-Snowpocalypse Edition

    The winter wonderland is a distant memory. Roads are clear, kids are back in school and the first robins of spring are heading this way. We’re back to a very demanding reality. But on the bright side, here are some events that are much less likely to be cancelled.
    THURSDAY
    The State of Eugenics @ Wake Forest University (W-S), 5 p.m.
    The film, which screens at the Porter Byrum Center on the campus of Wake Forest University, tells the true story of North Carolina’s aggressive eug
  • Man surrenders in Greensboro Christmas Eve stabbing

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  • Trump’s America: Streep throat

    Naturally, the president elect of the United States took to Twitter at 6 a.m. to talk smack about Meryl Streep, who just a few hours earlier had given a politically charged acceptance speech for a Lifetime Achievement Award at the Golden Globes.
    Donald Trump called Streep — whose list of awards and nominations has its own Wikipedia page — “one of the most over-rated actresses in Hollywood” and a “Hillary flunky,” and lied as he denied that he had ever mocked
  • McCrory changed parole eligibility for apartment fire killer...

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  • Sessions supporters use confirmation hearing to scoff at civilian distrust of police

    There isn't any good reason to distrust police or scrutinize their use of force decisions, two supporters of the man likely to be America's next Attorney General agreed Wednesday. Civilian distrust of police "is totally without foundation," Sen. Orrin Hatch said during confirmation hearings for Attorney General nominee Sen. Jeff Sessions .
  • Alleged mastermind of gun smuggling ring faces charges in Gulfport

    Paula Villalva-Patricio, 56, had been questioned in 2011 when a Jackson County deputy sheriff found flak jackets, which are bullet-resistant, and 9mm pistols hidden in a vehicle driven by her husband, an affidavit says. She reportedly said she had no knowledge of the hidden items.

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