• Japanese Scientists Invent Floating 'Firefly' Light

    An anonymous reader quotes a report from Reuters: Japanese engineering researchers say they have created a tiny electronic light the size of a firefly which rides waves of ultrasound, and could eventually figure in applications ranging from moving displays to projection mapping. Named Luciola for its resemblance to the firefly, the featherweight levitating particle weighs 16.2 mg, has a diameter of 3.5 mm (0.14 inch), and emits a red glimmer that can just about illuminate text. But its minuscule
  • NRA Gives Ajit Pai 'Courage Award' and Gun For 'Saving the Internet'

    The National Rifle Association (NRA) today gave its Charlton Heston Courage Under Fire Award to Ajit Pai, chairman of the Federal Communications Commission. "Pai was about to speak at the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in Maryland when the award presentation seemed to catch him by surprise," reports Ars Technica. "The award is a handmade long gun that could not be brought on stage, so it will be housed in the NRA museum until Pai can receive it." From the report: "Ajit Pai, as y
  • Ask Slashdot: Software To Visualize, Manage Homeowner's Association Projects?

    New submitter jishak writes: I am a long time Slashdot reader who has been serving on an homeowner association (HOA) board for 7 years. Much of the job requires managing projects that happen around the community. For example, landscaping, plumbing, building maintenance, etc. Pretty much all the vendors work with paper or a management company scans the paper, giving us a digital version. I am looking for suggestions on tools to visualize and manage projects using maps/geolocation software to see
  • Dropbox Files To Go Public

    Ten years after its launch, Dropbox has filed to go public. The cloud storage company has been around since 2007 and has raised more than $600 million in funding. TechCrunch reports: We knew that it had already filed confidentially, but the company has now unveiled its filing, meaning the actual IPO is likely very soon, probably late March. The company says it will be targeting a $500 million fundraise, but this number is usually just a placeholder. The filing shows that Dropbox had $1.1 billion
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  • Tesla Will Supply Free Charging Stations To Office Parking Lots

    Tesla has unveiled a new "workplace charging" program today, which offers businesses free Tesla wall connectors and will also cover installation, provided they meet certain qualifications set forth by the California carmaker. "Tesla won't cover the cost of operating the charging stations, and the company says there could be other permitting, construction, zoning, or labor costs," reports The Verge. From the report: The workplace charging stations will be compatible with all Tesla cars, but not w
  • How a Fight Over Star Wars Download Codes Could Reshape Copyright Law

    An anonymous reader quotes a report from Ars Technica: A federal judge in California has rejected Disney's effort to stop Redbox from reselling download codes of popular Disney titles like Frozen, Beauty and the Beast, and the latest Star Wars movies. Judge Dean Pregerson's Tuesday ruling invoked the little-used doctrine of copyright misuse, which holds that a copyright holder loses the right to enforce a copyright if the copyright is being abused. Pregerson faulted Disney for tying digital down
  • Apple Devices At California Repair Center Keep Calling 911

    Since October 2017, Apple has made around 1,600 false alarm 911 calls from a distribution site in Elk Grove. "We've been seeing these calls for the last four months from Apple," said police dispatcher Jamie Hudson. "We're able to see quickly where the call is coming from, so when we get one from Apple, the address will come up with their location." CBS Sacramento reports: On average, Elk Grove Police say they've received 20 accidental 911 calls a day from Apple, roughly 1,600 calls since October
  • Google ARCore 1.0 Now Available, Google Lens-Enabled Google Photos App Coming Soon

    Google revealed that its augmented reality developer kit, ARCore, is no longer in beta. ARCore 1.0 is now available, and developers can submit AR apps to the Google Play Store. The company also announced that Lens is coming to Google Photos.
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  • The College Board Pushes To Make Computer Science a High School Graduation Requirement

    theodp writes: Education Week reports that the College Board wants high schools to make it mandatory for students to take computer science before they graduate. The call came as the College Board touted the astonishing growth in its Advanced Placement (AP) computer science courses, which was attributed to the success of its new AP Computer Science Principles (AP CSP) class, a "lite" alternative to the Java-based AP CS A course. "The College Board is willing to invest serious resources in making
  • 'Critical' T-Mobile Bug Allowed Hackers To Hijack Users' Accounts

    An anonymous reader quotes a report from Motherboard: The vulnerability was found and reported by a security researcher on December 19 of last year, but it hasn't been revealed until now. Within a day, T-Mobile classified it as "critical," patched the bug, and gave the researcher a $5,000 reward. That's good news, but it's unclear how long the site was vulnerable and whether any malicious hackers found and exploited the bug before it was fixed. The newly disclosed bug allowed hackers to log into
  • Facebook's Mandatory Anti-Malware Scan Is Invasive and Lacks Transparency

    Louise Matsakis, writing for Wired: The internet is full of Facebook users frustrated with how the company handles malware threats. For nearly four years, people have complained about Facebook's anti-malware scan on forums, Twitter, Reddit, and on personal blogs. The problems appear to have gotten worse recently. While the service used to be optional, Facebook now requires it if it flags your device for malware. And according to screenshots reviewed by WIRED from people recently prompted to run
  • Intel, AMD, Google Respond To US Government Meltdown/Spectre Inquiry

    In a response to a U.S. government inquiry on the Meltdown/Spectre incident, Intel and other companies agreed that embargoing the disclosure of the vulnerabilities was the correct choice.
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  • New Windows 10 Insider Preview Build Makes Changes To Windows Update

    Microsoft released a new Windows 10 Insider Preview build that is designed to be more proactive at keeping PCs up to date.
  • Manafort Left an Incriminating Paper Trail Because He Couldn't Figure Out How to Convert PDFs to Word Files

    There are two types of people in this world: those who know how to convert PDFs into Word documents and those who are indicted for money laundering. Former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort is the second kind of person , Slate reports. From the report: Back in October, a grand jury indictment charged Manafort and his business associate Rick Gates with a variety of crimes, including conspiring "to defraud the United States." On Thursday, special counsel Robert Mueller filed a new indictment a
  • System Requirements Revealed For 'Hunt: Showdown,' Now In Early Access

    Crytek's new first-person shooter will be in Early Access for a year.
  • An Early Preview Of 'Pillars Of Eternity II: Deadfire,' Hands On

    Need an RPG fix? Obsidian's upcoming game will easily meet your expectations.
  • Performance Analysis: World of Tanks enCore, Tested on 10 GPUs

    Wargaming.net plans to upgrade World of Tanks with its enCore engine in the near future. We explored the graphics-quality improvements and performance implications of this new engine technology.
  • From 1999 To 2016, America Lost 11.4 Million People From the Workforce

    Andrew Van Dam, writing for the Washington Post: Where did all the jobs go? Well, we're finally starting to find some satisfactory answers to the granddaddy of all economic questions. The share of Americans with jobs dropped 4.5 percentage points from 1999 to 2016 -- amounting to about 11.4 million fewer workers in 2016. At least half of that decline probably was due to an aging population. Explaining the remainder has been the inspiration for much of the economic research published after the Gr
  • Airlines Won't Dare Use the Fastest Way to Board Planes

    An anonymous reader writes: You've arrived at the airport early. You have already selected the perfect seat. You've employed all possible tricks for making the check-in and security processes zoom by. But there's still some blood-pressure-raising chaos you can't avoid: boarding. From impatient fellow travelers who are determined to beat you onto the plane to passengers who insist on jamming their too-big carry-ons into overhead bins, making your way to your seat can be straight-up hellish -- and
  • How To Disable Wi-Fi Sense In Windows 10

    Although Wi-Fi Sense is enabled in Windows 10 by default in an effort to provide a hassle-free experience, using the feature could also be a security concern.
  • The 'Loudness' of Our Thoughts Affects How We Judge External Sounds

    The "loudness" of our thoughts -- or how we imagine saying something -- influences how we judge the loudness of real, external sounds, a team of researchers from NYU Shanghai and NYU has found. From a report: Its study, titled "Imagined Speech Influences Perceived Loudness of Sound" and published in the journal Nature Human Behaviour, offers new insights into the nature of brain activity. The research project was conducted by Tian Xing and Bai Fan from NYU Shanghai with, David Poeppel and Teng X
  • EK Water Blocks Reveals GPU Block For Nvidia's Titan V

    EK Water Blocks has a habit of supporting every model of graphics card that Nvidia and AMD push out the door, but we can honestly say we didn’t see this one coming. EKWB today revealed a full-cover water block for Nvidia’s Volta-powered Titan V.
  • Supreme Court Declines To Broaden Whistleblower Protections

    The U.S. Supreme Court this week refused to broaden protections for corporate insiders who call out misconduct, ruling they must take claims of wrongdoing to the Securities and Exchange Commission in order to be shielded against retaliation. From a report: The justices ruled 9-0 in favor of Digital Realty Trust, throwing out a lawsuit brought against the California-based real estate trust by a fired former employee who had reported alleged wrongdoing only internally and not to the SEC. The 2010
  • States Re-File Lawsuit Against FCC To Challenge Net Neutrality Repeal

    One day after the FCC’s formal repeal of net neutrality regulation was published, a coalition of states has re-filed its lawsuit challenging the order.
  • Aorus Gaming Giveaway and SSD Repair: Community Roundup

    Community Roundup is here to let you know the best of what's going on in the Tom's Hardware forums on a regular basis.
  • More Than 40% of Global Log-in Attempts Are Malicious

    More than 40% of global log-in attempts are malicious thanks to bot-driven credential stuffing attacks, according to the latest report from Akamai. From a report: The cloud delivery provider's latest State of the Internet/Security report for Q4 2017 comprised analysis from over 7.3 trillion bot requests per month. It claimed that such requests account for over 30% of all web traffic across its platform per day, excluding video streaming. However, malicious activity has seen a sharp increase, as
  • Windows 10 On Arm Isn't The Same As Upgradeable Windows 10 S

    Microsoft and Qualcomm are marketing their “Always Connected PCs” as regular Windows 10 devices when they may not be compatible with many existing Windows apps or peripherals.
  • Soderbergh's Thriller Shot on iPhone Premieres in Berlin

    Director Steven Soderbergh said this week he so enjoyed making his psychological thriller "Unsane" on an iPhone, he would find it hard to go back to conventional filmmaking. From a report: "Unsane", which premieres at the Berlin film festival, was shot over just two weeks - way shorter than the months a movie usually takes. It tells the story of Sawyer Valentini, who moves to a new city to escape her stalker David but finds herself admitted to a mental health institution where he works.Read more
  • CableMod Now Offers Premium 'Pro Series' Cables And Extensions

    CableMod today introduced the CableMod Pro series, a new premium product line that offers thicker cables, integrated cable combs, and a new pallet of colors to select.
  • Graphics Card Deals Are Showing Up On...Massdrop?

    As the GPU shortage continues, people are exploring any possible means of acquiring a GPU at a reasonable price. Massdrop is sliding into the PC component retail market at just the right time.
  • OpenBSD Releases Meltdown Patch

    OpenBSD's Meltdown patch has landed, in the form of a Version 11 code update that separates user memory pages from the kernel's -- pretty much the same approach as was taken in the Linux kernel. From a report: A few days after the Meltdown/Spectre bugs emerged in January, OpenBSD's Phillip Guenther responded to user concerns with a post saying the operating system's developers were working out what to do. Now he's revealed the approach used to fix the free OS: "When a syscall, trap, or interrupt
  • Intel Did Not Tell US Cyber Officials About Chip Flaws Until Made Public

    Intel Corp did not inform U.S. cyber security officials of Meltdown and Spectre chip security flaws until they leaked to the public, six months after Alphabet notified the chipmaker of the problems, according to letters sent by tech companies to lawmakers on Thursday. From a report: Current and former U.S. government officials have raised concerns that the government was not informed of the flaws before they became public because the flaws potentially held national security implications. Intel s
  • Benchmarking Oculus' Not-So-Exclusive 'Brass Tactics'

    'Brass Tactics' from Hidden Path Entertainment is an Oculus-exclusive title, but that didn't stop us from playing it with Microsoft's Windows Mixed Reality platform and testing its performance with FCAT.
  • 'Nobody Cares Who Was First, and Nobody Cares Who Copied Who': Marco Arment on Defending Your App From Copies and Clones

    Marco Arment: App developers sometimes ask me what they should do when their features, designs, or entire apps are copied by competitors. Legally, there's not a lot you can do about it: Copyright protects your icon, images, other creative resources, and source code. You automatically have copyright protection, but it's easy to evade with minor variations. App stores don't enforce it easily unless resources have been copied exactly. Trademarks protect names, logos, and slogans. They cover minor v
  • Samsung Rescues Data-Saving Privacy App Opera Max and Relaunches it as Samsung Max

    Samsung has rescued Opera Software's Opera Max data-saving, privacy-protecting Android app from oblivion and relaunched it today as Samsung Max. From a report: Norwegian tech company Opera, which first became known for its desktop browser when it launched in 1995, has offered mobile browser apps across various platforms for years. But in 2014, it launched the standalone Opera Max app for Android, designed to get its users more bang from their data plan, along with some VPN-like features. The app
  • MyDigitalSSD SBX NVMe SSD Review

    MyDigitalSSD is the first out of the gate with a retail Phison E80-powered SSD. The SBX is the entry-level successor to the popular BPX and brings more performance to the table.
  • 'Automating Jobs Is How Society Makes Progress'

    An anonymous reader quotes a report from Quartz, written by Per Bylund, assistant professor at Oklahoma State University: Analysts discuss the automation of jobs as if robots are rising from the sea like Godzilla, rampaging through the Tokyo of stable employment, and leaving only chaos in their wake. According to data from PWC, 38% of jobs in the U.S. could become automated by the early 2030s. Meanwhile, a report from Ball State University's Center for Business and Economic Research warned that
  • Major New Study Confirms Antidepressants Really Do Work

    According to authors of a groundbreaking study, antidepressants really do work in treating depression, though some are more effective than others. "Millions more people around the world should be prescribed pills or offered talking therapies, which work equally well for moderate to severe depression, say the doctors, noting that just one in six people receive proper treatment in the rich world -- and one in 27 in the developing world," reports The Guardian. From the report: "Antidepressants are
  • Amateur Astronomer Spots Supernova Right As It Begins

    New submitter Rotten shares a report from Gizmodo: Amateur astronomer Victor Buso was testing his camera-telescope setup in Argentina back in September 2016, pointing his Newtonian telescope at a spiral galaxy called NGC613. He collected light from the galaxy for the next hour and a half, taking short exposures to keep out the Santa Fe city lights. When he looked at his images, he realized he'd captured a potential supernova -- an enormous flash of light an energy bursting off of a distant star.
  • AMD’s New Radeon Software Adrenalin Edition Improves ‘FFXII’ Performance

    AMD released a new version of its Radeon Software Adrenalin Edition graphics driver, adding support for "Brass Tactics" and improving performance in "Final Fantasy XII: The Zodiac Age" and "Sea of Thieves."
  • US Border Officials Haven't Properly Verified Visitor Passports For More Than a Decade Due To Improper Software

    An anonymous reader quotes a report from ZDNet: U.S. border officials have failed to cryptographically verify the passports of visitors to the U.S. for more than a decade -- because the government didn't have the proper software. The revelation comes from a letter by Sens. Ron Wyden (D-OR) and Claire McCaskill (D-MO), who wrote to U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CPB) acting commissioner Kevin K. McAleenan to demand answers. E-passports have an electronic chip containing cryptographic informa
  • Antarctica Is Losing Ice Faster Every Year

    A survey of satellite data published in the journal Cryosphere confirms what scientists have suspected for a while now: ice loss from the critical region of Antarctica is happening at an increasingly fast pace. Quartz reports: In total, researchers found that Antarctica lost roughly 1,929 gigatons of ice in 2015, which amounts to an increase of roughly 36 gigatons per year every year since 2008. (A gigaton is one billion tons.) Nearly 90% of that increase in loss occurred in West Antarctica, "pr
  • The Los Angeles Times Website Is Unintentionally Serving a Cryptocurrency Mining Script

    troublemaker_23 shares a report from iTWire: The Los Angeles Times website is serving a cryptocurrency mining script which appears to have been placed there by malicious attackers, according to a well-known security expert. British infosec researcher Kevin Beaumont, who has warned that Amazon AWS servers could be held to ransom due to lax security, tweeted that the newspaper's site was serving a script created by Coinhive. The Coinhive script mines for the monero cryptocurrency. The S3 bucket us
  • FTC Releases Article on Choosing VPN Apps for Mobile Phones

    Original release date: February 22, 2018The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has issued guidance to consumers considering using a Virtual Private Network (VPN) for their mobile phones. Some mobile phone users choose to use VPNs to shield the information on their phones when using public Wi-Fi networks.NCCIC/US-CERT encourages consumers to review the FTC article for more information.This product is provided subject to this Notification and this Privacy & Use policy.
  • Study Finds Automatic Braking With Rearview Cameras, Sensors Can Cut Backup Crashes By 78 Percent

    A new study from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) found that combining automatic braking with rearview cameras and sensors can cut reverse crashes by 78 percent. Rear automatic braking alone, which is an option in just 5 percent of new vehicles, is linked to a 62 percent drop in reported backup accidents in cars with that equipment. CBS News reports: Starting in May, all new cars in the U.S. will be required to have a rearview camera. Some automakers are going further by adding
  • 23 Attorneys General Refile Challenge To FCC Net Neutrality Repeal

    An anonymous reader quotes a report from Reuters: A coalition of 22 state attorneys general and the District of Columbia on Thursday refiled legal challenges intended to block the Trump administration's repeal of landmark rules designed to ensure a free and open internet from taking effect. The Federal Communications Commission officially published its order overturning the net neutrality rules in the Federal Register on Thursday, a procedural step that allows for the filing of legal challenges.
  • Nearly Half of Parents Worry Their Child Is Addicted To Mobile Devices, Study Finds

    According to a new survey from Common Sense Media and SurveyMonkey, 47% of parents worry their child is addicted to their mobile device. By comparison, only 32% of parents say they're addicted themselves. USA Today reports: Half of parents also say they are at least somewhat concerned about how mobile devices will affect their kids' mental health. Nearly one in five say they're "extremely" or "very" concerned. According to the survey, 89% of parents believe it's up to them to curb their children
  • Elon Musk Steps Down From AI Safety Group To Avoid Conflict of Interest With Tesla

    New submitter the gmr writes: According to an announcement on the OpenAI blog, Elon Musk has stepped down from the board of directors of the nonprofit AI safety group, which he co-founded in 2015, due potential conflict of interest with his company Tesla. As explained in a post on Futurism, the move away from OpenAI may indicate that Tesla may be moving forward with more AI projects than most people may realize. Musk's departure may mean that Tesla is closer to delivering vehicles capable of Lev
  • President Trump: 'We Have To Do Something' About Violent Video Games, Movies

    An anonymous reader quotes a report from Ars Technica: In a White House meeting held with lawmakers on the theme of school safety, President Donald Trump offered both a direct and vague call to action against violence in media by calling out video games and movies. "We have to do something about what [kids are] seeing and how they're seeing it," Trump said during the meeting. "And also video games. I'm hearing more and more people say the level of violence on video games is shaping more and more
  • Three Class-Action Lawsuits Target AMD Over Spectre Vulnerability

    Three class-action lawsuits have been filed on behalf of consumers who purchased AMD's processors in the time between the discovery and disclosure of the Spectre vulnerability.

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