• Ptolemaic-Era Tombs Uncovered in Egypt

    CAIRO, EGYPT—Three rock-cut tombs from the Ptolemaic era have been discovered near the town of Samelut in Upper Egypt, according to a report from Ahram Online. The tombs, which were discovered by an Egyptian archaeological mission, contain a number of sarcophagi of varied shapes and sizes in addition to a range of clay fragments. Studies of these fragments suggest they are from the 27th Dynasty and the Greco-Roman era. “This fact suggests that the area was a large cemetery over a lon
  • Initiation Rites and Rock Art in Namibia

    WINDHOEK, NAMIBIA—A recent survey of rock art in the Namib Desert is yielding new insights into the cultures of ancient hunter-gatherers, reports the International Business Times. Among the most intriguing rock art panels recorded by the survey is one that depicts a female antelope, or kudu. Dating to perhaps 3,000 years ago, it probably played a role in female initiation rituals, says Quaternary Research Services archaeologist John Kinahan. Such rituals took place in isolated locations in
  • Anglo-Saxon Cemetery on Lindisfarne Excavated

    DURHAM, ENGLAND—Two complete skeletons have been discovered in what is thought to be an Anglo-Saxon cemetery on the Holy Island of Lindisfarne, off the northeast coast of England, according to a report from Chronicle Live. The cemetery is believed to have been linked to the island’s monastery, and those buried in it may have included those who worked the monastery’s land or pilgrims who traveled to the island. Another dig on the island recently discovered an early church. &ldqu
  • Early Islamic House Unearthed in Jordan

    JERASH, JORDAN—Live Science reports that archaeologists have unearthed the remains of an extravagant early Islamic period house in the city of Jerash. The building seems to have been destroyed on January 18, 749, when an earthquake struck the city. The team did not find any objects related to daily life, but they did find troughs filled with thousands of the stone cubes known as tesserae that are used to create mosaics. That suggests that the house was possibly undergoing a remodel at the
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  • Silver Coins Signal Rome's Rise

    FRANKFURT, GERMANY—The International Business Times reports that a new geochemical study shows that shortly after the Romans defeated the Carthaginians in the Second Punic War, they began to mint their coins in silver mined on the Iberian Peninsula, which Carthage had controlled up to that point. A team led by Katrin Westner of the Institute for Archaeological Sciences at Goethe University, Frankfurt, tested the silver content of 70 Roman coins minted between 310 and 101 B.C. They found th
  • Audio News for August 6 through 12, 2017

    News items read by Laura Pettigrew include:Ancient statue may provide new information on the importance of women in ancient Anatolian society(details)Evidence of cannibalism in English cave may show alternative way of honoring the dead(details)Anthropologists use ancient domesticated animals to study human migration in American Southwest(details)Sacrificed canine remains tie mythical texts to physical evidence of young men’s Bronze Age rites of passage(details)
  • Circular Wall Unearthed in Peru

    CUSCO, PERU—Andina reports that Peruvian archaeologists digging a site in the surburbs of Cusco have unearthed a circular wall that was erected some 3,000 years ago. Built by an ancient people known as the Marcavalle culture, the structure measures 22 feet in diameter and was probably a dwelling that might have also had a ceremonial function. Inside, the team discovered pottery featuring human and animal faces, as well as figurines and dog and other animal bones. A second walled structure,
  • 106-Year-Old “Edible” Fruitcake Found in Antarctica

    CHRISTCHURCH, NEW ZEALAND—A fruitcake that predates the outbreak of World War I has been discovered in Antarctica, according to a report from BBC News. The 106-year-old delicacy was found by a team from the New Zealand–based Antarctica Heritage Trust on Cape Adare. It is thought to have belonged to British explorer Robert Falcon Scott. The tin holding the cake was somewhat rusty, but the cake itself was found to be in good condition—and even smelled edible. The cake was uncover
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  • Temporary Field Technicians needed for survey in southwest Georgia

    Posted by Deptford.Tagged under: [employment-listings](click on the link to view details about this job listing and to see other job opportunities for archaeology professionals)
  • Staff Archaeologist / GIS Specialist - Glendora, California

    Posted by MCC, Inc..Tagged under: [archaeologists] [field-supervisor] [GIS] [employment-listings] [full-time](click on the link to view details about this job listing and to see other job opportunities for archaeology professionals)
  • Archaeological Research Associate - Death Valley

    Posted by GreatBasin.Tagged under: [employment-listings](click on the link to view details about this job listing and to see other job opportunities for archaeology professionals)
  • Archaeological Field Technicians - Throughout California

    Posted by MCC, Inc..Tagged under: [fieldwork] [Paleo] [field-tech] [archaeology] [employment-listings](click on the link to view details about this job listing and to see other job opportunities for archaeology professionals)
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  • Excavations Uncover Zanzibar's Colonial History

    ZANZIBAR TOWN, ZANZIBAR—According to a report in United Arab Emirates-based The National, a team of researchers led by archaeologist Mark Horton from the University of Bristol has uncovered the foundations of two early-17th-century Portuguese churches on the island of Zanzibar, which lies off the coast of Tanzania. Horton and his colleagues, including archaeologists from Zayed University in Abu Dhabi, made the discovery while excavating an 18th-century Arab fort in Stone Town, the oldest q
  • Archaeologists Confirm Viking Fortress

    AARHUS, DENMARK—Archaeologists in Denmark have used advanced remote-sensing technology to confirm the existence of a tenth-century Viking ring fortress, reports the International Business Times. While the site had been tentatively identified since the 1970s as a fortress of the Trelleborg type (characterized by a telltale circular shape and precise internal structure), only recently has technology such as LiDAR been available that allows researchers to measure subtle differences in the gro
  • Medieval Parchment DNA and Proteins Studied

    COPENHAGEN, DENMARK—Research on the proteins and DNA held in medieval parchment manuscripts is providing new insights into how the manuscripts were made and used, according to a report from New Scientist. Researchers from the University of Copenhagen, University of York, and Trinity College Dublin studied manuscripts including the York Gospels, which were written around A.D. 1000. Since conventional methods of extracting DNA from the manuscripts were deemed too invasive, the researchers us
  • Iron Age Statue Unearthed in Turkey

    TAYINAT, TURKEY—The International Business Times reports that archaeologists have unearthed a large fragment of an Iron Age statue in eastern Turkey. Discovered near the gate to the citadel of the Neo-Hittite capital of Kunulua, the statue depicts a woman with curls in her hair, and would have once stood between 13 and 16 feet high. The team, led by University of Toronto archaeologist Timothy Harrison, believes that the monument dates to the early ninth century B.C. and probably was e
  • Field Archaeologists - Oklahoma and Texas

    Posted by Enercon Cultural Resources.Tagged under: [field-tech] [crew-chief] [employment-listings] [survey](click on the link to view details about this job listing and to see other job opportunities for archaeology professionals)
  • Scientists Examine England’s Engraved Human Bones

    LONDON, ENGLAND—Silvia Bello of London’s Natural History Museum says human remains uncovered in southwestern England’s Gough’s Cave bear signs of cannibalism, such as butchering marks and tooth imprints. The New York Times reports that zigzag patterns cut into the 15,000-year-old bones indicate the practice may have been ritualistic at times. Similar zigzag patterns have been found in France on animal bones dating to the same period. Bello and her colleagues compared the
  • Chaco Canyon Petroglyph May Depict Solar Eclipse

    BOULDER, COLORADO—A 900-year-old petroglyph on a free-standing rock in Chaco Canyon could depict the solar eclipse that occurred over New Mexico on July 11, 1097, according to a report in Newsweek. J. McKim Malville of the University of Colorado, Boulder, says the carving is made up of an image that looks like the sun’s outer atmosphere—a circle surrounded by “tangled, looped protrusions” on its edges. Human figures are also shown engaged in different activities. Ma
  • Field Archaeologists needed in Southern California

    Posted by rinconconsultants.Tagged under: [archaeologists] [employment-listings](click on the link to view details about this job listing and to see other job opportunities for archaeology professionals)
  • Stone Vessel Workshop Discovered in Galilee

    REINA, ISRAEL—Arutz Sheva reports that a second workshop where vessels were carved from chalkstone has been discovered in Lower Galilee. Israel Antiquities Authority archaeologists say they have uncovered thousands of chalkstone cores and fragments of stone mugs and bowls in the small cave. Excavation director Yonatan Adler explained that according to ancient Jewish ritual law, vessels made of pottery are easily made impure and must be broken. Tableware made from stone vessels, however, wa
  • 13-Million-Year-Old Skull May Represent Human Ancestor

    STONY BROOK, NEW YORK—Science Magazine reports that an almost complete skull of an infant Miocene ape has been discovered sticking up out of the ground in Kenya’s Turkana Basin. The baseball-sized skull, which has been dated to 13 million years ago, could help scientists learn more about the last common ancestor of modern apes and humans, which lived an estimated seven million years ago. The team of researchers, led by Isaiah Nengo of Se Anza College and the Turkana Basin Institute,
  • Tracking Ancestral Puebloans Through Turkey DNA

    NORMAN, OKLAHOMA—Where did the Ancestral Puebloans go when they left Chaco Canyon and Mesa Verde some 800 years ago? According to a report in Science Magazine, scientists led by molecular anthropologist Brian Kemp of the University of Oklahoma are attempting to track the Ancestral Puebloans through DNA samples taken from the remains of their domesticated animals. The researchers extracted mitochondrial DNA from turkey bones found at archaeological sites near Mesa Verde in southwestern Colo
  • Researchers Return to Early Polynesian Site in New Zealand

    DUNEDIN, NEW ZEALAND—A team of archaeologists has returned to an archaeological site near the northern tip of New Zealand that could date to the arrival of the first Polynesians in the area, some 700 years ago. Live Science reports that archaeologists first investigated the site, located on Moturua Island, in 1981. The current team members are also studying the artifacts recovered during that dig. The items include a shell pendant, dog remains, bone fish hooks, shell fragments, and animal
  • Human Tooth Hints at Early Migration Out of Africa

    SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA—Kira Westaway of Macquarie University and her colleagues have found evidence of the presence of Homo sapiens on the Indonesian island of Sumatra dated to between 63,000 and 73,000 years ago, according to a report in New Scientist. “This is a significant finding because it supports emerging ideas that modern humans left Africa and reached Australia much earlier than we thought,” said Michelle Langley of Griffith University. The evidence came in the form of two
  • Bone Ornaments Discovered in Southern India

    HYDERABAD, INDIA—One India reports that a collection of 50 carved bone ornaments has been found southern India. The nearly identical, rhombus-shaped ornaments are decorated with carved circular indentations. Holes in the middle suggest they may have been worn as jewelry. “There was a certain sense of calculation, certain technology, aestheticism involved,” commented N.R. Visalatchy, an official in the Department of Archaeology and Museums of Telangana. Further testing will help
  • New Jersey: material culture specialist/historic artifact cataloger

    Posted by IleneGB.Tagged under: [artifacts] [employment-listings](click on the link to view details about this job listing and to see other job opportunities for archaeology professionals)
  • Vikings Freeze-Dried Cod to Weather Long Sea Journeys

     OSLO, NORWAY—Viking fishermen appear to have freeze-dried cod and transported it from the Arctic to Germany hundreds of years earlier than the fish was known to have arrived there, according to a report from New Scientist. Researchers from the University of Oslo and the University of Cambridge compared DNA from four ancient cod samples found at Haithabu, a Viking-era village in what is now northern Germany, with around 170 modern cod samples and concluded that the ancient samples cam
  • Siberian Warrior Burial Unearthed

    OMSK, RUSSIA—The remains of a warrior who lived during the transition from the Bronze Age to the Iron Age were unearthed during renovation of a historical building in the Siberian town of Omsk. The Siberian Times reports that the man was buried holding a dagger in one hand and a knife in the other, as if prepared for combat. He was attired in style, wearing earrings and a metallic disk over one eye. An axe and several arrowheads were also found near the burial, which was one of five t
  • Possible Bronze Age Rituals Identified

    KRASNOSAMARSKOE, RUSSIA—Science News reports that researchers believe they have discovered evidence for Indo-European initiation rituals that took place between 1900 and 1700 B.C. on the Russian steppe. Hartwick College archaeologists David Anthony and Dorcas Brown led excavations at the Bronze Age Krasnosamarskoe site and discovered more than 2,000 dog bones and several wolf bones. Analysis of the animals' teeth showed that they were all likely killed during winter. Several ancient Indo-E
  • Medicine Buddha Statue Found at Angkor Site in Cambodia

    Cambodia Daily reports that a team of researchers working at Angkor Thom in Cambodia has made its second major discovery in the course of two weeks. Excavating the remains of a 12th-century hospital built under the reign of Khmer ruler King Jayavarman VII in the ancient city of Angkor, archaeologists have uncovered a Buddha statue that they believe was once installed in the hospital's chapel. Last week, the team discovered a six-foot-tall sandstone statue of a guard that would have stood sentry
  • Archaeological Crew Chief - Full-time, Pittsburgh, PA

    Posted by Apogee2.Tagged under: [crew-chief] [employment-listings] [1-2-yrs-exp](click on the link to view details about this job listing and to see other job opportunities for archaeology professionals)
  • Scientists Examine Corn’s High-Altitude History

    TÜBINGEN, GERMANY—Early farmers in Mexico are thought to have domesticated the maize plant some 4,000 years ago. According to a report in Nature News, the practice of growing maize then spread north into the southwest United States, but the evidence suggests the plant wasn’t grown in high-altitude regions for another 2,000 years. Researchers led by Kelly Swarts of the Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology examined genomes obtained from 2,000-year-old maize cobs unearthe
  • Pharaoh May Have Suffered From Gigantism 4,500 Years Ago

    ZURICH, SWITZERLAND—According to a report in Live Science, in 1901, a mummy identified as Sa-Nakht, a Third-Dynasty pharaoh, was discovered in an elite tomb in Upper Egypt. He was estimated to have stood more than six feet tall at a time when most men were about five and a half feet tall. Could the better diet likely available to a king account for his above-average size? Researchers led by Egyptologist Michael Habicht of the University of Zurich recently reexamined Sa-Nakht’s remain
  • An Update from Florida’s Santa Maria de Ochuse

    PENSACOLA, FLORIDA—According to a WUWF report, Santa Maria de Ochuse, the settlement founded by Tristan de Luna, extended over a minimum of 27 acres. Located on a level site overlooking Pensacola Bay, the settlement was inhabited by 1,500 Spanish colonists between 1559 and 1561. A hurricane and storm surge in 1559 destroyed most of the expedition’s supplies and ships shortly after their arrival. The excavation team from the University of West Florida is working to find the outlines o
  • Audio News for July 30 through August 5, 2017

    News items read by Laura Pettigrew include:Exceptional size and preservation marks a Roman neighborhood in southern France(details)Bronze stylus from Turkey marks the importance of literacy across the Roman Empire(details)Medieval Angkor hospital site produces statue of hospital shrine guardian(details)Newfoundland dig uncovers a 2,000 year old camp(details)
  • Archaeological Technician - NM and CO

    Posted by ecs.Tagged under: [employment-listings](click on the link to view details about this job listing and to see other job opportunities for archaeology professionals)
  • Woman’s Preserved Head Discovered in Arctic Cemetery

    SALEKHARD, RUSSIA—The Siberian Times reports that the mummified remains of a woman have been found for the first time in the Zeleny Yar necropolis on the edge of the Arctic. All of the other burials unearthed at the site to date have belonged to men and children. A team of scientists from the Institute of the Problems of Northern Development SB RAS estimate the woman stood five feet, one inch tall, although her body was poorly preserved, and that she was about 35 years old at the time of h
  • Warships Mapped Off the Coast of Scotland

    ORKNEY ISLANDS, SCOTLAND—Live Science reports that marine archaeologists led by Sandra Henry of the Orkney Research Center for Archaeology used a multi-beam echo sounder and underwater robots to map ten naval shipwrecks at the bottom of Scapa Flow, a body of water sheltered by five of the Orkney Islands. The project is intended to help researchers track the condition of the wreck sites. “It's quite important for us to understand their current condition and how they’re deteriora
  • Humans First Modified Tropical Forests 45,000 Years Ago

    MUNICH, GERMANY—A new study suggests humans have been encroaching on tropical forests for 45,000 years, according to a report in The International Business Times. Researchers including Patrick Roberts of the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, and Chris Hunt of Liverpool John Moores University, found that hunter-gatherers in Southeast Asia, Australia, and New Guinea practiced controlled burns of tropical forest, perhaps in order to create additional “forest-edge&rd
  • Bronze Stylus Unearthed at Assos

    ÇANAKKALE PROVINCE, TURKEY—An 1,800-year-old stylus has been unearthed in the ancient city of Assos in northwestern Turkey, according to a report in Daily Sabah. Nurettin Arslan of Çanakkale Onsekiz Mart University said the bronze writing implement is pointed on one end and has a flat edge on the other. “The flat part at the back side of the stylus was used to make corrections,” Arslan explained. Merchants and the wealthy would have kept their records on wax table
  • Archaeological Crew Chief & Crew position in Phoenix, AZ

    Posted by PaleoWest Archaeology.Tagged under: [archaeologists] [anthropology] [crew-chief] [employment-listings] [per-diem](click on the link to view details about this job listing and to see other job opportunities for archaeology professionals)
  • BCR Consulting Seeking GIS Expert

    Posted by david.brunzell@yahoo.com.Tagged under: [employment-listings](click on the link to view details about this job listing and to see other job opportunities for archaeology professionals)
  • Underwater Archaeologists Explore Inca Lakes

    WARSAW, POLAND—Science & Scholarship in Poland reports that scientists from the Center for Precolumbian Studies at the University of Warsaw explored lakes within the Peruvian National Park of Machu Picchu. The remote, high-altitude lakes sit at the foot of the Salkantay Glacier, and are very deep, making it difficult to transport equipment to the sites and to explore them safely. Two of the lakes, Soctacocha and Yanacocha, are located near the Camino Inca, a trail that connected Machu
  • Ainu Skeletal Remains Repatriated to Japan

    BERLIN, GERMANY—The Asahi Shimbun reports that an Ainu skull removed from a cemetery by a private academic society in Berlin in the late nineteenth century has been handed over to authorities at the Japanese Embassy in Berlin, at the request of the Japanese government. The skull has since been placed in a charnel house for displaced Ainu remains at Hokkaido University, where more than 1,000 sets of bones are housed. “We will look after the remains with great care, while maintaining d
  • GIS Technician (Cultural Resources)

    Posted by GreatBasin.Tagged under: [employment-listings](click on the link to view details about this job listing and to see other job opportunities for archaeology professionals)
  • Research Coordinator, Seminole Tribe of Florida Tribal Historic Preservation Office

    Posted by ddebeaubien.Tagged under: [employment-listings](click on the link to view details about this job listing and to see other job opportunities for archaeology professionals)
  • Immediate opening for one Field Tech - Phase I Survey in Brunswick County, NC

    Posted by wggreen@terracon.com.Tagged under: [employment-listings](click on the link to view details about this job listing and to see other job opportunities for archaeology professionals)
  • Assistant Lab Director - Northern Virginia

    Posted by FCPA/ACB.Tagged under: [employment-listings](click on the link to view details about this job listing and to see other job opportunities for archaeology professionals)
  • Archaeology Technicians (Craters of the Moon National Park)

    Posted by GreatBasin.Tagged under: [employment-listings](click on the link to view details about this job listing and to see other job opportunities for archaeology professionals)

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