• Possible Norman Cemetery Excavated in Sicily

    WROCLAW, POLAND—Science in Poland reports that researchers led by Sławomir Moździoch of the Polish Academy of Sciences have discovered a medieval cemetery in Sicily, near the ruins of the church of San Michele del Golfo. After examining the bones from ten of the graves, the researchers were able to classify just five of the dead as three women and two children. The size and build of the bones suggests they may have been Normans from northern France, who conquered the island in ad
  • Bits of Ancient Bread Unearthed in Jordan

    COPENHAGEN, DENMARK—The Guardian reports that archaeologist Amaia Arranz-Otaegui of the University of Copenhagen and colleagues have found charred crumbs of bread baked 14,000 years ago by Natufian hunter-gatherers living in northeast Jordan. It had been previously believed that bread was first produced by early farmers. Among the more than 600 charred, bread-like lumps found in a fireplace, the excavation uncovered small tubers from a wetland plant, legumes, wild wheat and barley, and pla
  • Fishing May Have Driven Use of Pottery in Ancient Japan

    YORK, ENGLAND—According to a report in Cosmos Magazine, archaeologist Alex Lucquin of the University of York and colleagues analyzed residues obtained from more than 800 ancient pots recovered from more than 46 sites in Japan, and found traces of seafood in all of the samples—even on the pots found inland. It had been thought that the expansion of forests in southern Japan after the last Ice Age would have shifted people’s diets towards foods obtained from hunting and gathering
  • Temporary Archaeological Field Technicians - Phoenix Area

    Posted by Logan Simpson Design.Tagged under: [fieldwork] [CRM] [field-tech] [employment-listings] [temporary](click on the link to view details about this job listing and to see other job opportunities for archaeology professionals)
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  • NAGPRA Coordinator (Anthropology - Auburn University)

    Posted by cns0039.Tagged under: [employment-listings](click on the link to view details about this job listing and to see other job opportunities for archaeology professionals)
  • Mummification Workshop Excavated in Egypt

    GIZA, EGYPT—The Associated Press reports that a 2,500-year-old mummification workshop and a 100-foot-long burial shaft lined with burial chambers carved into the bedrock have been excavated at Saqqara. One of the burials consists of a badly damaged wooden coffin containing a mummy wearing a gilded silver mask, thought to have belonged to the second priest of Mut. “Very few masks of precious metals have been preserved to the present day, because the tombs of most ancient Egyptian
  • Iron-Age Wooden Bowl Found in Scotland

    SOUTH RONALDSAY, SCOTLAND—A 2,000-year-old wooden bowl has been found in a chamber accessed with a series of stone-cut steps beneath Cairns Broch, a round tower at an Iron-Age village site on South Ronaldsay, one of Scotland’s Orkney Islands, according to a report in The Independent. Researchers led by Martin Carruthers of the University of the Highlands and Islands think the bowl may have been placed there before the broch was sealed and abandoned. “In appearance, the bowl is
  • Ancient Papyrus Restored and Translated

    BASEL, SWITZERLAND—According to a Live Science report, a wad of 2,000-year-old papyrus from the collections of the University of Basel has been restored and translated, revealing a previously unknown composition. An examination of the papyrus with ultraviolet and infrared light revealed the sheets may have been stuck together, possibly to be reused as a bookbinding. Once a restorer separated the wad into individual sheets, the Greek text could be read. Ancient historian Sabine Huebner expl
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  • 5,500-Year-Old Passage Tomb Unearthed in Ireland

    COUNTY MEATH, IRELAND—The Aberdeen Evening Express reports that a Neolithic passage tomb has been discovered in Ireland’s Boyne Valley by researchers from University College Dublin and a private agricultural technology company. A large stone cairn measuring about 130 feet in diameter had been placed over the tomb’s main passage and two burial chambers within the western part of the structure. Six of the stones that had been placed in a ring around the perimeter have also been f
  • Audio News for July 8 through 14, 2018

    News items read by Laura Pettigrew include:Whale bones from Roman sites near Gibraltar show two species once thrived here(details)Early stone tools in northwest China show hominins arrived here by 2.1 million years ago(details)New work at Cuernavaca shows the famous Mexican temple style may have developed here(details)New excavations at Olympia find earliest written excerpt from Homer’s Odyssey(details)
  • Possible Evidence of War Unearthed at Sardis

    MANISA, TURKEY—Hurriyet Daily News reports that possible traces of the war between the Lydians and the Persians in 546 B.C. has been unearthed in what is known as the Palace region at Sardis, the ancient capital of the Lydian kingdom in western Turkey. Previous excavations in this area of the city have uncovered huge terrace walls that could have supported a monumental building, as well as a military shield, ivory from a piece of furniture, and a stone seal. “These pieces make our pr
  • Byzantine- and Roman-era Rooms Uncovered in Egypt

    ALEXANDRIA, EGYPT—Ahram Online reports that chambers dating to the Roman and Byzantine periods have been unearthed in Alexandria. Mostafa Waziri of the Supreme Council of Antiquities said one of the Roman-era chambers has huge stone blocks set at right angles and smooth Doric columns. A large number of Roman coins were also recovered. The walls of the Byzantine-era rooms were crafted from irregular blocks of stones fitted together with weak mortar. Another room had a tiled floor and a deco
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  • Unusual 2,500-Year-Old Skull Found in Burial Cave in Sicily

    PALERMO, SICILY—According to a Live Science report, archaeologists led by Roberto Miccichè of the University of Palermo were investigating an artificial cave in northern Sicily where more than 50 people were buried some 2,500 years ago, when they found a lone skull that had been placed above the tomb’s main entrance, facing into the cave. The burials were looted at some point, but the researchers think the robbers used a different entrance to the cave and left the skull in its
  • West Virginia Field Crew, Mon-Sun Lodging Provided

    Posted by cruzezc.Tagged under: [employment-listings](click on the link to view details about this job listing and to see other job opportunities for archaeology professionals)
  • Stone Tools Suggest Early Arrival of Hominins in Asia

    EXETER, ENGLAND—According to a report in The Atlantic, tools made by human ancestors some 2.1 million years ago have been discovered in northwestern China by an international team of scientists led by archaeologist and climatologist Zhaoyu Zhu of the Chinese Academy of Sciences. The tools are thought to have been made by Homo erectus or Homo habilis, but no hominin fossils have been found at the site. “Very importantly here, there are no geological processes that could have flaked th
  • Otzi the Iceman’s Stomach Contents Analyzed

    BOLZANO, ITALY—Analysis of Otzi the Iceman’s stomach contents indicate his last meal included the fat and meat of ibex and red deer, whole wheat seeds, and fern leaves and spores, according to an Associated Press report. Otzi is the name given to man who died some 5,300 years ago in the Italian Alps and whose frozen, mummified remains were discovered by hikers in 1991. Scientists had previously examined his intestines, but this is the first time that they have reviewed the conte
  • Henge Site Spotted in Ireland’s Boyne Valley

    COUNTY MEATH, IRELAND—BBC News reports that a monument or henge has been revealed on private land in eastern Ireland by the current heat wave and drought conditions. Author Anthony Murphy and Ken Williams flew a drone equipped with a camera over the site, located near Newgrange, a 5,000-year-old passage tomb, and other prehistoric monuments built along the River Boyne, to spot the outline of the structure. “There’s more moisture in the field where the features of this site are
  • 900-Year-Old Temple Discovered in South-Central Mexico

    MORELOS, MEXICO—BBC News reports that a temple has been found in the pyramid at Teopanzolco by archaeologists from Mexico’s National Institute of Anthropology and History. The scientists, who were evaluating structural damage to the pyramid with radar following an earthquake that struck the region last year, said the temple measured about 20 feet by 13 feet, and had been dedicated to Tláloc, the Aztec rain god, by the Tlahuica people. Most of the structures at Teopanzolco are
  • Field Technicians in Texas

    Posted by mmkoszarek.Tagged under: [fieldwork] [employment-listings](click on the link to view details about this job listing and to see other job opportunities for archaeology professionals)
  • New Thoughts on Human Evolution

    JENA, GERMANY—According to a report in The Atlantic, an international team of scientists led by archaeologist Eleanor Scerri of the University of Oxford argues that modern humans arose in different locations in Africa at different times, in a process called “African multiregionalism.” These groups of human ancestors are thought to have developed in isolation from each other, separated by geographical barriers, until climate change restructured the landscape and brought them tog
  • Did the Romans Hunt Whales?

    YORK, ENGLAND—A study of DNA and collagen obtained from whale bones led by Ana Rodrigues of the French National Center for Scientific Research and Camilla Speller of the University of York suggests the Romans may have hunted whales on an industrial scale, according to a BBC News report. The bones were recovered from four archaeological sites around the Strait of Gibraltar and one on the coast of northwest Spain, several of which have been linked to Roman fish-salting and the making of Roma
  • Additional Mosaics Uncovered at Huqoq Synagogue

    CHAPEL HILL, NORTH CAROLINA—A richly decorated fifth-century A.D. synagogue in northern Israel indicates that its Jewish village continued to thrive under Roman Christian rule, according to a Live Science report. Jodi Magness of the University of North Carolina said the mosaic floors of the Huqoq synagogue are colorful and filled with figured scenes, even though it had been previously thought that Jewish art of the period avoided the use of such images. Previously uncovered sections of the
  • Fall 2018 Internship Opportunity at the American Museum of Natural History

    Posted by RCajigas.Tagged under: [fieldwork] [internship] [museum] [lab] [employment-listings](click on the link to view details about this job listing and to see other job opportunities for archaeology professionals)
  • State Historic Preservation Archaeologist III

    Posted by matthew.b.fariss.Tagged under: [employment-listings](click on the link to view details about this job listing and to see other job opportunities for archaeology professionals)
  • Archaeology Field Technician - West Virginia

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  • Tarnished Daguerreotypes Yield Their Images

    LONDON, CANADA—Chemist Madalena Kozachuk of Western University and her colleagues, in a time-consuming process, used a synchrotron to scan tarnished nineteenth-century daguerreotypes to reveal their obscured images, according to a Science News report. By mapping the particles of mercury on the plates, the synchrotron was able to detect places where more light had been reflected during the photographic process, and thus formed the lighter areas of the image. “When the image became app
  • Rock Art Discovered in Tanzania

    KRAKOW, POLAND—Science in Poland reports that archaeologist Maciej Grzelczyk of Jagiellonian University has found hundreds of ancient rock paintings spread out over more than 50 locations in Tanzania’s Swaga Swaga Game Reserve. Grzelczyk said the paintings, made with red or white pigments, resemble those at Kondoa, a nearby UNESCO World Heritage Site. Many of them are so faded they can only be seen with special camera filters. “Red paintings are particularly varied: In addition
  • Odyssey Excerpt Uncovered in Greece

    ATHENS, GREECE—According to a Reuters report, Greece’s Culture Ministry announced the discovery of a Roman-era plaque engraved with 13 verses of The Odyssey at Olympia, the ancient home of the Olympic games. The epic poem, which tells the story of the hero Odysseus, king of Ithaca, and his ten-year journey home after the fall of Troy, is thought to have originated sometime between 725 and 675 B.C. In the verses on the third-century A.D. plaque, Odysseus is speaking to his friend Euma
  • Unfinished Roman Stele Unearthed in Bulgaria

    POPOVO, BULGARIA—Archaeology in Bulgaria reports that an unfinished grave stele, a pair of bronze tweezers, and more than 120 Roman and Byzantine coins were unearthed at the site of Kovachevsko Kale Fortress in northeast Bulgaria. The fortress is thought to have been built between A.D. 308 and 324 as protection for a city whose Roman name remains unknown. The stele measures more than three feet tall, two feet wide, and one foot thick. Plamen Sabev of the Popovo Museum of History said the c
  • Traces of Roman and Medieval Industry Found in England

    BOURNEMOUTH, ENGLAND—The Daily Echo reports that excavations near Poole Harbor in southern England have uncovered traces of past industrial activity in what is now an area noted for its natural beauty. A kiln and other workshops dating to the Roman period and a saltworks dating to the medieval period are among the discoveries. “It’s a real privilege to dig such a site from a time period we know very little about in this area, beyond the focal point of Corfe Castle,” said
  • Halberstadt’s Executed Victims Weren’t Locals

    HALBERSTADT, GERMANY—Live Science reports that isotope analysis of the bones of eight men and one woman recovered from a 7,000-year-old mass grave reveals they were “outsiders with currently unknown origins,” according to archaeologist Christian Meyer of the State Office for Heritage Management and Archaeology of Saxony-Anhalt. The local people are known to have planted crops and raised livestock, but the isotope levels of the victims’ bones did not match those of other p
  • Crop Marks Appear in Wales

    ABERYSTWYTH, WALES—BBC News reports that an ongoing heat wave in Britain has resulted in the emergence of crop marks across Wales. Crop marks form when dry conditions parch the landscape, but some vegetation remains green because it draws on the nutrients and moisture trapped in backfilled fortification ditches. The Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Wales is working to photograph as many of the marks from the air as possible before the next rain. For more, go to &
  • Audio News for July 1 through 7, 2018

    News items read by Laura Pettigrew include:Early Norse board game is latest clue in search for lost Scottish monastery(details)New efforts to verify whether famous Roanoke Stone is early American clue, or later hoax(details)New tomb find in Alexandria as research on Egypt’s ancient seacoast continues(details)Tomb complex on Peru’s coastal desert show long re-use by many cultures(details)
  • Seeking full-time archaeologist, central Texas

    Posted by SPS.Tagged under: [employment-listings](click on the link to view details about this job listing and to see other job opportunities for archaeology professionals)
  • California Cultural Resources Monitors Needed State-Wide

    Posted by CogstoneRMI.Tagged under: [geoarchaeology] [employment-listings](click on the link to view details about this job listing and to see other job opportunities for archaeology professionals)
  • Cultural Resources Monitor Needed, Riverside County, CA

    Posted by CogstoneRMI.Tagged under: [employment-listings](click on the link to view details about this job listing and to see other job opportunities for archaeology professionals)
  • Cultural Resource Monitors Needed, Orange County, CA

    Posted by CogstoneRMI.Tagged under: [employment-listings](click on the link to view details about this job listing and to see other job opportunities for archaeology professionals)
  • Roman Inscription Unearthed in Thracian City

    YAMBOL, BULGARIA—Archaeology in Bulgaria reports that an intact Roman-era inscription has been uncovered in the ancient Thracian city of Kabyle, which is located in southeastern Bulgaria. The city was home to rulers of the Odrysian Thracian kingdom from the fifth century B.C. until the first century A.D., when it was conquered by the Romans. The seven lines of Latin text, engraved on a two-foot-tall stone slab, are said to date to the reign of Marcus Aurelius, who ruled from A.D. 161 to 18
  • Large Houses Found Near Egypt’s Giza Pyramids

    GIZA, EGYPT—Live Science reports that the remains of two 4,500-year-old structures have been uncovered at an ancient port near the Giza pyramids by a team of researchers led by Mark Lehner of Ancient Egypt Research Associates. The buildings are thought to have served as housing for a priest who may have been a high-ranking government official and an official in charge of the production of food for a paramilitary force during the reign of Menkaure, who ruled from about 2490 to 2472 B.C. A t
  • Genes of North America’s First Dogs Studied

    OXFORD, ENGLAND—The mitochondrial DNA of ancient North American dogs has not been found in any other canines, according to a report in Science Magazine. A genetic study of dogs who lived in North America and Siberia between 1,000 and 10,000 years ago found that the genetic signature of the ancient American dogs most closely resembles that of 9,000-year-old dogs from Russia’s Zhokhov Island, which lies north of the Siberian mainland. A study of dogs’ nuclear DNA also supports th
  • Medieval Game Board Discovered in Scotland

    ABERDEENSHIRE, SCOTLAND—A game board thought to have been used to play Hnefatafl, a Norse strategy game, has been found in eastern Scotland, according to a report in The Scotsman. Archaeologist Ali Cameron of the Book of Deer Project said the game board dates to the medieval period. The team of researchers discovered it during the search for a Pictish-era monastery near the small village of Old Deer, where the Book of Deer, a volume of the Christian gospels containing the oldest-known writ
  • "Lucy's Baby" Had Grasping Big Toes

    HANOVER, NEW HAMPSHIRE—According to a Live Science report, a study of DIK-1-1, the remains of a three-year-old Australopithecus afarensis individual discovered in Dikika, Ethiopia, suggests that she had a grasping big toe that probably helped her hold onto her mother and even climb trees some 3.3 million years ago. Paleoanthropologist Jeremy DeSilva of Dartmouth College and his colleagues said the toddler’s two-inch long foot resembles the feet of modern humans, except for the curved
  • Inca Burials Found in Lambayeque Pyramid of the Bees

    TÚCUME, PERU—According to a Reuters report in the New York Times, two dozen burials dating to the time of the Inca Empire have been found in the Pyramid of the Bees at the Lambayeque site of Tucume, which is located in a desert valley near Peru’s northern coastline. Archaeologist Jose Manuel Escudero said the space had been reused by the Inca, but there is no evidence at this time that they took it over by force. The cave-like tombs within the adobe pyramid contain human
  • Permanent Staff Archaeologist need in Northern California (Bay Area)

    Posted by C.rich.Tagged under: [archaeologists] [fieldwork] [CRM] [employment-listings] [full-time](click on the link to view details about this job listing and to see other job opportunities for archaeology professionals)
  • Archaeological Field Technician - Portland, Oregon

    Posted by swca.Tagged under: [employment-listings](click on the link to view details about this job listing and to see other job opportunities for archaeology professionals)
  • Archaeology Technician I - Jemez Mountains, NM

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  • Field Director postition - Phoenix, AZ

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  • Mongolia’s Earliest Evidence of Equine Dentistry

    JENA, GERMANY—Live Science reports that researchers led by William Taylor of the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History examined the remains of 85 horses buried between 1200 and 700 B.C. in Mongolia by the nomadic Deer Stone–Khirigsuur culture and found evidence of early equine dental care. In the skull of one of the horses, dated to 1150 B.C., a tooth sticking out at an odd angle bears a cut mark that suggests someone may have used a stone to form it into a shape that
  • Project Manager - Phoenix

    Posted by PaleoWest Archaeology.Tagged under: [archaeologists] [archaeology] [employment-listings] [project-manager](click on the link to view details about this job listing and to see other job opportunities for archaeology professionals)
  • Bronze Coins Recovered in 2,300-Year-Old Tomb

    ROME, ITALY—A cache of coins dating to the third century B.C. has been found at the Poggetto Mengarelli necropolis at the Vulci archaeological site, located near the coast of the Tyrrhenian Sea, according to a report in ANSA. The 15 large bronze coins bear images of the god Janus Bifrons on one side and the prow of a boat on the other, representing the passage to the underworld from the world of the living. They are thought to have been stored in a leather bag, and then placed in the buria

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