• Roman Ruler of Judea Named in 1,900-Year-Old Inscription

    HAIFA, ISRAEL—The Times of Israel reports that the name of a Roman ruler of Judea has been found in a 1,900-year-old inscription by scholars from the University of Haifa. Gargilius Antiques is now thought to have ruled over Judea in the years prior to the Bar Kochba revolt against Rome, which was fought between 132 and 136 A.D. The seven-line inscription, carved on a 1,300-pound rock, was found underwater at the site of Tel Dor, an ancient port city on the Mediterranean Sea. The rock may h
  • Dutch Authorities Return Sculpture to Italy

    ROME, ITALY—The Associated Press reports that Dutch police returned a second-century marble sculpture of the Roman empress Giulia Domna to Italian authorities at a ceremony in Amsterdam. The 12-inch head is thought to have been plundered from Hadrian’s Villa in Tivoli in 2012. Two people have been charged with the theft and with trying to sell the sculpture at an auction in Amsterdam. Carabinieri Major Massimo Maresca said that the auction house alerted Italian authorities. For more,
  • U.S. Repatriates Artifacts to Egypt

    WASHINGTON, D.C.—Five artifacts seized by federal agents have been handed over to Egyptian officials in a ceremony at the Egyptian embassy in Washington D.C. by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, according to a report from ABC News. The objects, including a child’s wooden sarcophagus, a mummy shroud, and a mummified hand, were recovered during investigations based in New York and Los Angeles. Dubbed “Operation Mummy’s Curse” and “Operation Mummy&rs
  • 2,000-Year-Old Pet Cemetery Unearthed in Egypt

    NEWARK, DELAWARE—USA Today reports that a 2,000-year-old pet cemetery has been discovered near a trash heap at the archaeological site of Berenike, a remote Roman port town on the Red Sea. The remains of dogs, monkeys, and cats have been unearthed. Some of the carcasses had been carefully placed under mats or jars. A few of them were wearing iron collars, some of which were decorated with ostrich-shell beads. Marta Osypińska of the Polish Academy of Sciences notes that the necks of th
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  • Archaeological Technicians Needed- San Diego, Ca

    Posted by kmguerrero.Tagged under: [archaeologists] [fieldwork] [field-tech] [employment-listings](click on the link to view details about this job listing and to see other job opportunities for archaeology professionals)
  • Where Did “Lucy” Spend Her Time?

    BALTIMORE, MARYLAND—A report in The Washington Post suggests that the early human ancestor Australopithecus afarensis, which had hips, feet, and legs suitable for walking, and ape-like long arms with curved fingers, probably spent a significant amount of time in trees. Biological anthropologist Christopher Ruff of Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and his colleagues compared X-ray microtomography scans of Lucy, the 3.18-million-year-old Australopithecus afarensis fossil specimen, with scans
  • Archaeological Monitors (M.A. or Ph.D Required) Oklahoma, Arkansas, & Tennessee - 4th Announcement

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  • Temple Dedicated to Wind God Found in Mexico City

    MEXICO CITY, MEXICO—A circular platform unearthed at a construction site in Mexico City was part of a temple dedicated to Ehecatl-Quetzalcoatl, the god of wind, according to a report in The Guardian. The white stucco temple, built by the Mexica-Tlatelolca people some 650 years ago, was round on three sides, had a rectangular platform on the fourth, and was located within a large ceremonial site in the ancient city of Tlatelolco. Archaeologists from Mexico’s National Institute of Anth
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  • Lumps of Bitumen Identified in Sutton Hoo Boat Burial

    ABERDEEN, SCOTLAND—BBC News reports that a team of scientists from the British Museum and the University of Aberdeen analyzed lumps of organic material found in the boat burial at Sutton Hoo. Excavated in 1939 in an Anglo-Saxon cemetery in the East of England, the lavish, seventh-century boat burial contained a ceremonial helmet, a shield and sword, and gold and gemstone dress fittings. It had been thought that the lumps were pine tar, which is made from trees and can be used for boat main
  • Mummified Legs May Have Been Queen Nefertari’s

    ZURICH, SWITZERLAND—Seeker reports that a pair of mummified legs housed at the Egyptian Museum in Turin, Italy, may have belonged to Queen Nefertari, wife of Ramses II, who is thought to have ruled Egypt between 1290 and 1224 B.C. Nefertari’s tomb in the Valley of the Queens was plundered and her mummy damaged in antiquity. In 1904, Italian archaeologist and diplomat Ernesto Schiaparelli found fragments of her pink granite sarcophagus, a well-made pair of sandals, and the two fragmen
  • Rockshelter Restoration Crew Members - Texas

    Posted by aswtproject.Tagged under: [employment-listings](click on the link to view details about this job listing and to see other job opportunities for archaeology professionals)
  • Archaeology Technicians - BLM Southern Nevada District, Las Vegas, NV

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  • Priest Hole Mapped in English Tudor Country House

    NOTTINGHAM, ENGLAND—The Stratford-upon-Avon Herald reports that a research team led by Chris King, Lukasz Bonenbergand, and Sean Ince of the University of Nottingham has used new scanning technology to produce a 3-D map of a priest hole hidden at Coughton Court, a Tudor country house in Warwickshire. A priest hole was a concealed, secret chamber where a Catholic priest could hide during the religious persecution that followed the English Reformation in the seventeenth century. The priest h
  • Early Burial Rituals Studied in Brazil

    LEIPZIG, GERMANY—According to a report in Live Science, a team led by André Strauss of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology is investigating some of the earliest burial rituals in the New World at the site of Lapa do Santo in east-central Brazil. Some 10,600 years ago, the dead were buried intact within the large limestone cave. Then, about 1,000 years later, Strauss and his colleagues say, fresh corpses were dismembered and defleshed before burial. Even teeth were
  • Principal Investigator - Lake Okeechobee, FL

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  • Fourteenth-Century Plague Pit Unearthed in England

    LINCOLNSHIRE, ENGLAND—Estimates suggest that up to half of England’s population died of the Black Death between 1346 and 1353. The Independent reports that a team of archaeologists has unearthed a mass grave at the monastery hospital at Thornton Abbey, in the East of England. The remains of 48 people, including more than 20 children, were found in the grave. DNA testing of tooth pulp obtained from the skeletons has revealed the presence of Yersinia pestis, the bacterium that causes t
  • Field Archaeologists-Oklahoma and Arkansas

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  • Archaeology within the context of criminal justice: from forensics to heritage crime

    Two videos from a session at the CIfA conference for the weekly video post.
    Session Abstract:
    Although the contexts differ between archaeology and crime scene work, the methods applied in both are similar. Features are registered, finds are collected and analysed, a chronology of events is established, human interactions are reconstructed and reports are written. Working within the context of the law requires a chain of evidence and a report that is understood by judges and will withstand examin
  • Southwestern Clay Figurines Studied

    TUCSON, ARIZONA—Western Digs reports that Mark Chenault of Westland Resources found a cache of clay figurines at a pre-contact village site in the Sonoran Desert. Only a few similar objects have been found in the Southwest. It had been proposed that the “long, bulbous objects” were used in ancestor veneration or even as children’s toys, but the new research suggests that they were used as tokens of fertility employing both male and female symbolism. The phallus-shaped fig
  • New Thoughts on the Origins of Glass

    SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS—Some scholars have suggested that glassmaking originated in Mesopotamia some 3,600 years ago, but conservation scientist Katherine Eremin of Harvard Art Museums and archaeologist Andrew Shortland of Cranfield University think that glassmaking may have been invented in Egypt. Science News reports that glass beads and fragments of vessels and pendants recovered almost 100 years ago at the site of Nuzi, located in what is now Iraq, were thought to be the oldest glass artifa
  • Seventh-Century Earthworks Discovered in Japan

    CHIKUSHINO, JAPAN—An excavation on a hilltop on Japan’s southern island of Kyushu has found evidence of a seventh-century fortification, complete with castles and large-scale earthworks, according to a report in The Asahi Shimbun. The site is thought to have been part of a network of fortifications to protect the Dazaifu, or regional government, which was headquartered about four miles away. In A.D. 663, Japan sent an army to the Korean Peninsula to assist Korean Baekje forces fighti
  • Huge Bronze Age Torque Found in England

    CAMBRIDGESHIRE, ENGLAND—According to a report in the Peterborough Telegraph, a torque made from more than one and one-half pounds of twisted and burnished gold was found by a metal detectorist, some 50 miles from the site of Must Farm, an extremely well-preserved Bronze Age village in the East of England. Although torques were usually worn around a person’s neck, this one, estimated to be more than 3,000 years old, is so large that it may have been worn around the waist by a pregnant
  • Archaeological Field Technician - Burlington, NJ (1 week)

    Posted by maserconsulting.Tagged under: [job-hunt] [field-tech] [employment-listings] [temporary](click on the link to view details about this job listing and to see other job opportunities for archaeology professionals)
  • New Dates Suggested for Plovdiv’s Ancient Theater

    PLOVDIV, BULGARIA—The Sofia Globe reports that a Greek inscription found in a stairwell at the theater in the ancient city of Philippopolis suggests it was built earlier than had been previously thought. The theater was believed to date to A.D. 116, and the rule of Emperor Trajan, but the inscription, found on the base of a first-century statue, indicates that the construction of the theater began about three decades earlier, during the reign of Emperor Domitian. According to Nikolai Shara
  • Pembroke Castle Survey Reveals Possible Medieval Buildings

    PEMBROKE, WALES—According to a report from BBC News, a team from Dyfed Archaeology Trust has conducted a geophysical survey at Pembroke Castle, which was built in the eleventh century, to look for structures destroyed at the end of the medieval period. Parch marks on the ground, seen in aerial photographs taken in 2013, suggested possible outlines for the buildings. The new survey revealed the outlines of several buildings and a well in the castle’s outer ward, as well as the ou
  • Animals in Tomb of China’s First Emperor Analyzed

    SHAANXI PROVINCE, CHINA—Scientists are analyzing the many animal remains and animal sculptures unearthed in Emperor Qin Shi Huang’s mausoleum, which dates to the Qin Dynasty (221–206 B.C.) and is known for its army of terracotta warriors. China Daily reports that most of the animal figurines in the tomb are images of horses that were crafted with pottery, copper, and horse bones. Other figurines include representations of cranes, swans, and geese. The analysis of the many bones
  • Audio News for November 20 through 26, 2016

    News items read by Laura Pettigrew include:A unique Bronze Age ceramic vessel from Israel depicts a contemplative figure(details)A survey of Balkan archaeological sites finds changing settlement patterns after the Roman period(details) New cemeteries at the Egyptian city of Abydos are 5500 years old(details) New cemeteries at the Egyptian city of Abydos are 5500 years old(details)
  • Archeologist, GS-12 - Sacramento, CA

    Posted by Jennifer Palmer.Tagged under: [government] [archaeology] [employment-listings](click on the link to view details about this job listing and to see other job opportunities for archaeology professionals)
  • Archeologist, GS-09/11 - Fillmore, UT

    Posted by Jennifer Palmer.Tagged under: [government] [archaeology] [employment-listings](click on the link to view details about this job listing and to see other job opportunities for archaeology professionals)
  • Archeologist, GS-09 - Page, AZ

    Posted by Jennifer Palmer.Tagged under: [government] [archaeology] [employment-listings](click on the link to view details about this job listing and to see other job opportunities for archaeology professionals)
  • Archeologist, GS-09 - 3 vacancies, Term NTE 13 months, Page, AZ

    Posted by Jennifer Palmer.Tagged under: [government] [archaeology] [employment-listings](click on the link to view details about this job listing and to see other job opportunities for archaeology professionals)
  • Archeological Technician, GS-07 - 2 vacancies, Fruita, CO

    Posted by Jennifer Palmer.Tagged under: [field-tech] [government] [employment-listings](click on the link to view details about this job listing and to see other job opportunities for archaeology professionals)
  • Large Mud-Brick Tombs Discovered in Abydos

    ABYDOS, EGYPT—A cemetery and residential area dating to around the time of Egypt's First Dynasty (late fourth millennium B.C.) has been discovered in Abydos, according to a report in Egypt Independent. Both are thought to have been used by senior officials tasked with planning tombs for the ancient Egyptian royal family along with the workers who actually built the tombs. Archaeologists found remains of huts, pottery, and stone tools at the site. Hany Aboul Azm, head of the Central Adminis
  • Canonized Viking King Reburial Site Located

    OSLO, NORWAY—A shrine to a Viking king who was sainted has been discovered in Trondheim, according to a report in Live Science. Researchers from the Norwegian Institute for Cultural Heritage believe they have unearthed the stone foundations of a wooden church where the body of King Olaf Haraldsson was taken in 1031 shortly after he was declared a saint. Now known as St. Olaf, the king ruled Norway starting in 1016 but was challenged by Canute I of Denmark and died in battle in 1030. Olaf w
  • “Thinker” Statuette Uncovered in Israel

    YEHUD, ISRAEL—A seven-inch-tall clay figurine of a pensive man attached to a Middle Bronze Age pot was unearthed in the central Israel town of Yehud, The Times of Israel reports. The 3,800-year-old was discovered during the excavation of a future construction site carried out by archaeologists from the Israel Antiquities Association along with a group of high school students. “It seems they first prepared a pot characteristic of the period, and afterwards they added the unique statue
  • Plymouth Settlement Excavated

    BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS—Archaeologists have uncovered what they believe is part of the original settlement of the Pilgrims who arrived at Plymouth in 1620, The Boston Globe reports. A team from the University of Massachusetts Boston excavated a seventeenth-century trash pit at Burial Hill, the location of a cemetery dating back hundreds of years. The site had long been thought to be part of the Pilgrims’ first settlement, but archaeological work had been delayed due to concerns th
  • Archaeological Principal Investigator Position Open – White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico

    Posted by Vista Sciences .Tagged under: [employment-listings](click on the link to view details about this job listing and to see other job opportunities for archaeology professionals)
  • Plus ça change, plus c’est la même chose? How can we learn from our mistakes?

    Another week, another post of videos from conferences. Still from the 2016 CIfA conference.
    SESSION ABSTRACTThe latest Archaeological Market survey1 undertaken by Landward Research Ltd on behalf of CIfA, FAME and Historic England reported an average increase in turnover for archaeological practices of 15% in 2014-15. Coupled with a significant increase in the size of the archaeological workforce and the highest levels of business confidence since 2008, the report presents a positive picture of t
  • Paleontological Resources Field Technicians

    Posted by pluhmann.Tagged under: [employment-listings](click on the link to view details about this job listing and to see other job opportunities for archaeology professionals)
  • Archeological Field Technician

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  • 1,500-Year-Old Remains of Domesticated Turkeys Found in Mexico

    CHICAGO, ILLINOIS—Live Science reports that the remains of domesticated adult and juvenile turkeys; whole, unhatched eggs; and eggshell fragments have been found in two residential structures dating to between A.D. 300 and 1200 at a Zapotec site known as Mitla Fortress in Oaxaca, Mexico. Researchers from Chicago’s Field Museum and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill say the turkeys were used for food and in domestic rituals. Archaeologist Heather Lapham of the University
  • Bronze Age Burnt Mound Excavated in Scotland

    INVERNESS, SCOTLAND—BBC News reports that road construction in Inverness has uncovered burned mounds dating to the Bronze Age. The mounds, made up of piles of burned waste, ash, and stones shattered by heat, were formed by repeated burning. Researchers from AOC Archaeology Group explained that the mounds are usually horseshoe shaped and found close to streams. The heated stones are thought to have been placed in pits filled with water in order to to heat it for cooking, washing wool, or as
  • 1,500-Year-Old Domesticated Turkeys Found in Mexico

    CHICAGO, ILLINOIS—Live Science reports that the remains of domesticated adult and juvenile turkeys; whole, unhatched eggs; and eggshell fragments have been found in two residential structures dating to between A.D. 300 and 1200 at a Zapotec site known as Mitla Fortress in Oaxaca, Mexico. Researchers from Chicago’s Field Museum and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill say the turkeys were used for food and in domestic rituals. Archaeologist Heather Lapham of the University
  • Possible Trade Center Unearthed in Northern China

    BEIJING, CHINA—The China.org.cn reports that the remains of a 20-foot-wide road flanked by traces of 1,000-year-old buildings have been unearthed at the site of Haifeng Town in China’s northern Hebei province. Lei Jianhong of the Hebei Cultural Relics Institute said that the excavation team has unearthed a hearth, fire pits, wall footings, bricks, tiles, and pieces of porcelain thought to date to the Jin (A.D. 960–1276) and Yuan (A.D. 1271–1368) dynasties. The town is tho
  • Neolithic Ceremonial Site Uncovered Near Stonehenge

    WILTSHIRE, ENGLAND—The Salisbury Journal reports that a ceremonial site dating to 3650 B.C. has been found at Larkhill, about one and one-half miles north of Stonehenge. The causewayed enclosure measured about 220 yards in diameter, and was surrounded by ditches. Pottery, worked flint, animal bones, and human skull fragments have been found in the ditches. Excavators also uncovered a stone saddle quern used for grinding grain. The site is thought to have been used as a temporary settlement
  • On-Call Archaeologists and Paleontologists (4-6) - Southern California

    Posted by FCS_Talent.Tagged under: [project-archaeologist] [employment-listings] [2-5-yrs-exp] [monitoring](click on the link to view details about this job listing and to see other job opportunities for archaeology professionals)
  • Mid-Level Archaeologists - Irvine, California (Southern)

    Posted by FCS_Talent.Tagged under: [fieldwork] [artifacts] [geophysical-survey] [employment-listings] [2-5-yrs-exp](click on the link to view details about this job listing and to see other job opportunities for archaeology professionals)
  • Mid-Level Archaeologist - Walnut Creek, California (Northern)

    Posted by FCS_Talent.Tagged under: [fieldwork] [NEPA] [geophysical-survey] [employment-listings] [2-5-yrs-exp] [monitoring](click on the link to view details about this job listing and to see other job opportunities for archaeology professionals)
  • Segments of Roman Road Found in Ancient Dalmatia

    WARSAW, POLAND—Science & Scholarship in Poland reports that archaeologists have found previously unknown sections of Roman road in Bosnia and Herzegovina, in what was the Roman province of Dalmatia. The team of scientists, from the University of Warsaw and the University of Mostar, is conducting field surveys in heavily farmed areas, and analyzing aerial and satellite images, in order to locate and verify archaeological sites and enter them into a new database. “This is the first
  • Genetic Studies Investigate Maize Domestication

    COPENHAGEN, DENMARK—Science reports that two teams of scientists examined ancient cobs from Mexico for clues to the transformation of a grass called teosinte into domesticated maize. Jean Philippe Vielle-Calzada of Mexico’s National Laboratory of Genomics for Biodiversity and his colleagues returned to the caves in Tehuacán Valley where tiny maize cobs were found in the 1960s. They recovered several 5,000-year-old cobs, reconstructed more than 35 percent of the ancient maize g

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