• Genomes of Scythian Horses Mapped

    COPENHAGEN, DENMARK—The New York Times reports that Ludovic Orlando of the University of Copenhagen and an international team of scientists analyzed DNA extracted from the bones of 11 male horses buried in a mound some 2,300 years ago by the Scythians in what is now Kazakhstan; two male horses buried in a royal Scythian tomb some 2,700 years ago in southern Siberia; and the 4,100-year-old remains of a Sintashta mare found in Russia, near the border of Europe and Asia. The researchers were
  • Burns & McDonnell looking for field techs -- Texas & Oklahoma

    Posted by jfulmer@burnsmcd.com.Tagged under: [archaeologists] [employment-listings](click on the link to view details about this job listing and to see other job opportunities for archaeology professionals)
  • Archaeological Technicians - Phoenix, AZ

    Posted by PaleoWest Archaeology.Tagged under: [archaeologists] [anthropology] [field-tech] [employment-listings] [survey](click on the link to view details about this job listing and to see other job opportunities for archaeology professionals)
  • Medieval Castle Found in Poland

    WROCLAW, POLAND—Science & Scholarship in Poland reports that remnants of a fourteenth-century castle belonging to Bolko II the Small have been discovered on an island in the Czerna Wielka River. The castle is located in the Lower Silesian Wilderness of southwestern Poland and was mentioned in medieval documents, but archaeologists had not been able to look for it because the area was used a a military training ground until the 1990s. Pawel Konczewski of Wroclaw University said the cast
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  • Hominin DNA Recovered From Cave Sediments

    LEIPZIG, GERMANY—According to a report in Seeker, an international team of scientists has recovered hominin genetic material from cave sediments ranging in age from 14,000 to 550,000 years ago. Nine samples, taken from four archaeological sites, produced enough mitochondrial DNA for analysis. Neanderthal DNA was found in eight of the samples, most of which came from archaeological layers where no Neanderthal remains had been recovered. The ninth sample, from a site in Russia, yielded Denis
  • Archaeology Programs Coordinator

    Posted by Montpelier Archaeology.Tagged under: [museum] [employment-listings](click on the link to view details about this job listing and to see other job opportunities for archaeology professionals)
  • Visualising Words: Archaeological Narrative Through Poetry, Image and Performance

    Need something to do this weekend? How about watching some great presentations from the TAG conference:
    Session Abstract
    ‘Narratives do not always have to be presented in a purely linear sequential form’ (Pluciennik 1999)
    Building on the Tyrannical Tales session at TAG 2015 in Bradford, this session explores nontraditional narrative forms within archaeology; such as performance, poetics and graphical expression. We are concerned with their power to engage people emotionally and intel
  • Scans Provide a Glimpse of the Homo naledi Brain

    BLOOMINGTON, INDIANA—According to a report in Science News, Shawn Hurst of Indiana University and Ralph Holloway of Columbia University laser scanned the inside surfaces of severaln partial Homo naledi skulls, and created virtual casts to look for any surviving details of the brain surfaces. They found two grooves and imprints of folds of tissue on a partial Homo naledi skull in an area corresponding to Broca’s area in modern humans, which is linked to language as well as social
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  • Maya Sculpture Uncovered in Southern Mexico

    SUCHIAPA, MEXICO—The International Business Times reports that a piece of a Maya sculpture was discovered under a house on private land in the southern state of Chiapas. The carving is thought to represent the god of maize and abundance, and to date to the late Classic period, between A.D. 600 and 900. The carving has been housed at the Regional Museum of Chiapas. For more, go to “Rituals of Maya Kingship.”
  • Genetic Study Reveals Deep History of Dogs

    BETHESDA, MARYLAND—According to a report in Nature, biologists Heidi Parker and Elaine Ostrander of the National Institutes of Health, and their colleagues, examined the genomes of more than 1,300 dogs to develop a family tree for more than 160 breeds. The study suggests that dogs bred to perform similar functions, such as working or herding breeds, emerged at different times and places. “In retrospect, that makes sense,” Ostrander said. “What qualities you’d want i
  • Archeology Field Technicians - Thunderbird Archeology - DC Metro Area

    Posted by Thunderbird Archeology.Tagged under: [employment-listings](click on the link to view details about this job listing and to see other job opportunities for archaeology professionals)
  • NRCS seeking retired federal archaeologist for position in SW Colorado

    Posted by NRCS.Tagged under: [employment-listings](click on the link to view details about this job listing and to see other job opportunities for archaeology professionals)
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  • New Dates Suggested for Homo naledi

    JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA—According to a report in BBC News, Lee Berger of Wits University says the fossilized remains of Homo naledi, discovered in a remote chamber in South Africa’s Rising Star cave system, may be between 200,000 and 300,000 years old. When the specimens were discovered in 2015, Berger thought they could be up to three million years old. The new dates suggest that Homo naledi, which exhibits some traits similar to the genus Australopithecus, and some traits found
  • Mother-of-Pearl Ornament Found at Caesarea Maritima

    CAESAREA, ISRAEL—The Times of Israel reports that Israel Antiquities Authority archaeologists discovered a 1,500-year-old mother-of-pearl tablet inscribed with a six-branched menorah near a first-century B.C. temple dedicated to Augustus Caesar. The ornament is thought to have adorned a box that contained a Torah scroll, and to date to the fourth to fifth centuries A.D., pointing to a Jewish presence in Caesarea during the Byzantine period. The excavation team, led by archaeologist Peter G
  • Middle Stone Age Hunting Technology Found in South Africa

    LIÈGE, BELGIUM—Live Science reports that 25 stone points discovered in South Africa’s Sibudu Cave indicate that people had mastered using a pointed bone tool to manufacture stone weapons some 77,000 years ago. Known as “pressure flaking,” the technique removes small flakes from a sharpened stone in a controlled manner. Veerle Rots of the University of Liège said that some of the stone weapons in the study had been worked on both sides, and more than half of
  • Ancient Inscription May Link Cave to Shaolin Kung Fu

    SHIJIAZUHANG, CHINA—Xinhua reports that a 1,400-year-old inscription has been found carved on the wall of a cave in northern China’s Hebei Province. The inscription identifies the cave as a place of seclusion for Master Sengchou, who may have been in the military before he became a Buddhist monk in the sixth century A.D. Master Sengchou is remembered as a martial arts expert and is credited with promoting Zen Buddhism and the tradition of Shaolin monks practicing martial arts. &ldquo
  • Project Archaeologist Spokane Tribe of Indians

    Posted by lm8067.Tagged under: [project-archaeologist] [employment-listings](click on the link to view details about this job listing and to see other job opportunities for archaeology professionals)
  • Integrating Science, Technology and Theory in Prehistoric Archaeology

    It’s Wednesday, so another round of conference presentations we have filmed. This batch is from the TAG conference:
    Session Abstract:
    Prehistoric archaeology is at its best when scientific, technological and theoretical approaches can be integrated, creating dynamic approaches to myriad research questions, and providing a greater understanding of the archaeological past. It is increasingly important for the theorist to engage with scientific and technological approaches, and for the scient
  • Remote Internships with Archaeological Analytics- Summer 2017

    Posted by Archaeological Analytics.Tagged under: [internship] [employment-listings](click on the link to view details about this job listing and to see other job opportunities for archaeology professionals)
  • Archaeological Technicians Wanted in Southern California

    Posted by CogstoneRMI.Tagged under: [employment-listings] [monitoring](click on the link to view details about this job listing and to see other job opportunities for archaeology professionals)
  • World War I Training Tunnels Studied in England

    WILTSHIRE, ENGLAND—The Guardian reports that tunnels and trenches used to train Australian troops for the First World War have been investigated ahead of a construction project at Larkhill, an army base located about two miles from Stonehenge. Si Cleggett of Wessex Archaeology explained that more than 200 grenades were carefully recovered, and half of them were still live. The researchers also found food cans, combs, toothbrushes, cigarette and tobacco tins and pipes, candlesticks and stub
  • Who Was Australopithecus sediba?

    TEMPE, ARIZONA—According to a report in Science Magazine, Bill Kimbel of Arizona State University and Yoel Rak of Tel Aviv University have analyzed the skull of a juvenile Australopithecus sediba individual, discovered in Malapa, South Africa, in 2008 by Lee Berger of the University of Witwatersrand. Berger suggested that the Australopithecus sediba fossils, which have been dated to 1.98 million years ago, could represent an ancestor to Homo erectus and, thus, to modern humans. Kimbel and
  • New Thoughts on the Death of the Iceman

    ZURICH, SWITZERLAND—It has been suggested that Ötzi, the man whose frozen remains were found in a melting glacier in the Italian Alps in 1991, was murdered some 5,300 years ago. Examination of the body has revealed an arrow wound to the left shoulder and depressions and fractures in the skull. Frank Rühli of the University of Zurich thinks these wounds were not fatal, however, according to a report in Science News. The new analysis suggests that the arrow wound caused just a half
  • Archaeological Field Assistants (Syracuse, Rochester, Albany, NY)

    Posted by Environmental Design & Research.Tagged under: [employment-listings](click on the link to view details about this job listing and to see other job opportunities for archaeology professionals)
  • Why is the archaeological profession not more unionised?

    ‘Fellow archaeologists, I have a question for you: why is the archaeological profession not more unionized? It seems to me that this would be a promising strategy in helping to end the profession’s underpaid status.’
    That is the question asked by Elie in the BAJR Facebook group. The question has elicited a range of responses, mainly anecdotes and guesses. It is a question I have heard before and that latter assumption- unions means higher wages – is something I hear quite
  • Project Archaeologists, Crew Chiefs, and Technicians - Colorado

    Posted by ecs.Tagged under: [employment-listings](click on the link to view details about this job listing and to see other job opportunities for archaeology professionals)
  • Project Archaeologist (Duluth)

    Posted by ermrecruiting.Tagged under: [employment-listings](click on the link to view details about this job listing and to see other job opportunities for archaeology professionals)
  • Architectural Historian (Duluth)

    Posted by ermrecruiting.Tagged under: [employment-listings](click on the link to view details about this job listing and to see other job opportunities for archaeology professionals)
  • Townspeople May Have Fled 15th-Century Inca Invasion

    PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA—Elizabeth Arkush of the University of Pittsburgh suggests that the Colla people fled their homes in Ayawiri, a hillfort in Peru’s southern central Andes, when the Incas attacked around A.D. 1450, according to a report in The International Business Times. Arkush and her team uncovered valuable bronze jewelry, metal tools, and intact pottery in the round, stone houses at the site. She argues that the metal items, tools, and pots are things that the Colla would
  • New Thoughts on England’s White Horse Geoglyph

    SOUTHAMPTON, ENGLAND—According to a report in the International Business Times, archaeologist Joshua Pollard of the University of Southampton thinks the Uffington White Horse, a prehistoric geoglyph, is not a symbol of ownership, as has been suggested, but a representation of a mythical horse pulling the sun across the sky. Pollard says the horse’s body is positioned as if it is running up a slope, from a site known as Dragon Hill, toward a long mound, a round barrow, and Uffington C
  • Gold Jewelry Repatriated to Cambodia

    LONDON, ENGLAND—The Cambodia Daily reports that ten gold artifacts were handed over to Cambodian authorities by a private collector in London. The jewelry pieces, made of gold and other metals, are thought to have once decorated Khmer statues. Experts in Europe noticed the artifacts in publicity for a sale in a London-based gallery by a private collector, and contacted Cambodia’s Culture Minister, Phoeung Sakona. She explained that it is not known how the artifacts left the country,
  • DNA Obtained From Franklin Expedition Crew

    NUNAVUT, CANADA—According to a report in Live Science, a team led by Douglas Stenton of Nunavut’s Department of Culture and Heritage obtained DNA samples from at least 24 members of the ill-fated Franklin Expedition, which attempted to find a Northwest Passage linking the Atlantic and Pacific oceans in 1845. All were lost when Sir John Franklin’s ships were trapped in the ice of the Canadian Arctic and the sailors abandoned their ships in 1848. The tests revealed that the bones
  • WESTERN CULTURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT, INC. CREW MEMBER, CREW CHIEF, FIELD SUPERVISOR

    Posted by WCRM.Tagged under: [employment-listings](click on the link to view details about this job listing and to see other job opportunities for archaeology professionals)
  • The Knight’s Tombstone Conserved in Jamestown

    JAMESTOWN, VIRGINIA—The Williamsburg Yorktown Daily reports that Preservation Virginia conservators are working with large-stone specialist Jonathan Appell to preserve the so-called Knight’s Tombstone, which has lain on the floor of the church at Historic Jamestowne for some 400 years. The stone is carved with an image of a knight and was once adorned with monumental brasses. Nearly half of the 1,200 pound stone is in one piece; the lower section has cracked into several large pieces
  • Peru’s Logosyllabic Khipus Record 3-D Texts

    FIFE, SCOTLAND—According to a report in The Courier, Sabine Hyland of the University of St. Andrews has deciphered two lineage names from two eighteenth-century logosyllabic khipus found in the village of San Juan de Collata in the Peruvian Andes. Khipus, made by the Inca from cotton or fibers obtained from alpacas, llamas, or deer, were used to record and transport information. It was previously understood that the Incas used khipus to record numbers, but evidence that they were used to r
  • New Thoughts on the Origin of “The Hobbits”

    CANBERRA, AUSTRALIA—The Guardian reports that researchers led by Debbie Argue of Australian National University compared the bones of Homo floresiensis, also known as “The Hobbit,” to cranial, postcranial, mandibular, and dental samples of early hominids from several countries. It had been suggested that hobbits evolved from the much larger Homo erectus, which lived in the region, while isolated on the Indonesian island of Flores. But statistical analysis of the remains conclud
  • Images in the Making: Art-Process-Archaeology

    Here is a session we filmed at the TAG conference:
    Session Information
    Archaeological approaches to visual images have tended to present images as flat, static and lacking in dynamism; as evidence of this, semiotic or symbolic approaches still remain the prevailing approach to imagery in archaeology. This is a shame as research in a host of other fields including anthropology, history, art history and art practice approach images very differently (e.g. Anderson et. al. 2014; Barrett and Bolt 201
  • Ramesses II Colossus Restored to Luxor Temple

    LUXOR, EGYPT—Ahram Online reports that a colossal black granite statue of King Ramesses II has been restored and re-erected at Luxor Temple’s first pylon. The statue, damaged in an earthquake in the fourth century A.D., was discovered in 57 pieces in 1958. “These blocks were removed and placed [in the interim period] in wooden shelters on the first pylon’s western side,” said Mostafa Waziri, head of Luxor Antiquities. The restored sculpture stands 36 feet tall, and
  • 16th-Century English Garrison Walls Traced in Irish Town

    PORTLAOISE, IRELAND—A survey of Portlaoise, the capital of County Laois, has identified English sixteenth-century garrison walls in many of the town’s buildings, according to a report in the Leinster Express. “It’s surprisingly intact,” said Laois Heritage Officer Catherine Casey. “Seventy-five percent of the walls are still there. They form the front of the vocational school, they run down the back of Main Street, as some backyard walls, and some are inside O
  • 1,100-Year-Old Inscription Found in India

    TAMIL NADU, INDIA—The Times of India reports that a 1,125-year-old inscription has been discovered on the floor of the Arunachaleswarar Temple, one of the largest temple complexes in India. This inscription is thought to be just a few years younger than one discovered in the nineteenth century. “The inscription strengthens the theory that the temple was renovated a few centuries ago,” said Raj Panneerselvam of the Tiruvannamalai Heritage Foundation. This is because inscriptions
  • PaleoWest Archaeology hiring field technicians - southern Mississippi

    Posted by PaleoWest Archaeology.Tagged under: [employment-listings](click on the link to view details about this job listing and to see other job opportunities for archaeology professionals)
  • Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation seeks a Tribal Archaeologist.

    Posted by aaron.naumann.Tagged under: [archaeologists] [CRM] [Section-106] [employment-listings](click on the link to view details about this job listing and to see other job opportunities for archaeology professionals)
  • Pemmican-Production Camp Found in the Northern Plains

    TUCSON, ARIZONA—According to a report in Western Digs, a camp where pemmican was made by ancestors of the Blackfoot people some 500 years ago has been found at Kutoyis, a large bison-hunting site in north-central Montana. “A single bison may produce a few hundred pounds of meat, so a large kill site like Kutoyis would have produced thousands of pounds of meat at one time,” said researcher Brandi Bethke. Maria Nieves Zedeño of the University of Arizona explained the proce
  • Neolithic Skeleton Unearthed in Malaysia

    GEORGE TOWN, MALAYSIA—According to a report in the New Straits Times, a human skull, femur, and ribcage thought to be at least 5,000 years old were discovered during the construction of a museum at the Guar Kepah Neolithic site in northwestern Malaysia. The site is known for its shell middens, discovered in 1860, when more than 30 skeletons, now housed at the National Natuurhistorisch Museum in Leiden, Holland, were also recovered. Chief Minister Lim Guan Eng added that the state of Penang
  • Model Looms Discovered in 2,100-Year-Old Tomb in China

    CHENGDU, CHINA—Live Science reports that miniature silk looms have been found in a 2,100-year-old tomb in southwestern China. “We are very sure that the loom models from Chengdu are the earliest pattern looms around the world,” said Feng Zhao, of Donghua University and the China National Silk Museum. Such machines are thought to have produced the Shu jin silks of the Han Dynasty, which were traded along the Silk Road routes across Eurasia. The tomb was probably looted in antiqu
  • Historian/Historic Research Assistant needed--- San Diego, Ca.

    Posted by kmguerrero.Tagged under: [architectural-history] [employment-listings](click on the link to view details about this job listing and to see other job opportunities for archaeology professionals)
  • Call For Field Technician Resumes

    Posted by Apogee2.Tagged under: [archaeologists] [fieldwork] [project-archaeologist] [employment-listings] [resumes-cvs](click on the link to view details about this job listing and to see other job opportunities for archaeology professionals)
  • Archaeological Field Technician (South Lake Tahoe, Ca)

    Posted by GreatBasin.Tagged under: [employment-listings](click on the link to view details about this job listing and to see other job opportunities for archaeology professionals)
  • Thinking Through Archaeology and the Environmental Humanities

    It’s Wednesday, so another batch of conference videos. These videos are from a session at the recent TAG conference:
    Session Information
    ‘At its most basic, environmental humanities work has always challenged the idea that nature or the environment simply “is”. Environmental humanities suggest rather…that human ideas, meanings and values are connected in some important way to the shape that the “environment out there” assumes’ (Neimanis et al 2015
  • Ohio Museum Will Return Sculpture to Italy

    CLEVELAND, OHIO—The Plain Dealer reports that The Cleveland Museum of Art will hand over a marble portrait head of Drusus Minor, the son of Emperor Tiberius, to Italy. Museum officials learned that the sculpture, acquired in 2012, was excavated and photographed at the town of Sessa Aurunca in the 1920s, and taken from a museum there in 1944, during World War II. They had thought it had been part of an Algerian collection since the late nineteenth century. “It is disappointing, even d

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