• Republican lawmaker compares NFL protests to 'players giving Nazi salutes'

    Peter King criticizes Jets owner for saying he’ll pay finesDear black NFL players, don’t let yourselves be silencedA Republican congressman from New York on Saturday said NFL player protests over police brutality and racial injustice were “premised on lies”, and compared the action of kneeling during the playing of the national anthem to “players giving Nazi salutes” or “spewing racism”. Related: 'Patriotism and nationalism are different': NFL play
  • Has Britain’s attitude to sex and consent begun to change?

    Last week Sweden passed a law making sex without mutual agreement rape. But in Britain, attempts to educate men about the issue have met resistanceHow do you know if someone wants to have sex with you? It’s a question – about consent and what constitutes affirmative, enthusiastic, mutual desire – that has been under intense focus in recent months. On campuses and in workplaces, on nights out and in the press, the spectrum for debate is vast: serious sexual offences committed by
  • The unsavoury alliance between oligarchs and London’s top lawyers | Nick Cohen

    It’s a grubby business but these companies have no qualms about picking up the fat feesIf I were to describe secretive organisations that make millions from mafia states, you would imagine – what? Mercenaries? Conspiracies with Blofeld at their head? Nothing so thrilling, I’m afraid. Picture instead respectable lawyers of high status and higher income, whose love of money is now, in the words of the Commons foreign affairs committee, a matter of “national security”.
  • Short prison sentences do not work, says justice secretary

    David Gauke says he wants prison population to come down, with alternatives to short spells in jail for least serious offenders Short prison sentences of less than 12 months do not rehabilitate prisoners and should be a last resort, the justice secretary has said, adding that the UK is now holding too many people in jail. Related: Prisoners could help fill post-Brexit workforce gap, says ministerContinue reading...
  • Advertisement

  • Weinstein's arrest marks a profound shift – but how far will it go?

    It’s a victory for the #MeToo movement, but advocates caution significant work still needs to be done to change the system
    Gone were the red carpets and golden statues. The army of accommodating assistants and flattering executives had disappeared. Instead, on Friday morning, Harvey Weinstein was flanked by two police officers – one of whom was a woman – who led the dishonored Hollywood producer from the New York City police station where he had surrendered on charges of rape a
  • What is Harvey Weinstein charged with – and what happens next?

    The movie mogul could spent up to 25 years in prison, and officials have said they may add to the chargesThe disgraced movie mogul is charged with rape, a criminal sex act, sexual abuse and sexual misconduct for cases involving two women, according to the New York police department. Related: Harvey Weinstein appears in court charged with rape and other sexual offencesRelated: Harvey Weinstein: the women who have accused himContinue reading...
  • Harvey Weinstein: the remarkable downfall of Hollywood's biggest mogul

    The world was watching Weinstein’s surrender, handcuffed ‘perp walk’ and quiet exit from a New York courthouse on bailAs Harvey Weinstein stood in court listening to prosecutors outline the charges against him Friday, the formerly powerful film producer mostly stood with his mouth open and his eyes low.Then finally, as Manhattan assistant attorney Joan Illuzzi-Orbon crystalized the accusations against him, there was a change in expression. “This defendant used his positio
  • The Guardian view on Brexit in crisis: time for a reboot | Editorial

    The EU has an interest in helping the UK devise a new model of associate membershipBrexit is not just one negotiation between two sides. At its heart is the dialogue between the EU and Theresa May’s government, but that process has become increasingly detached from the negotiation that Mrs May conducts with her cabinet, her party, and parliament. The concept of Brexit being presented to British audiences now bears hardly any relation at all to the concept as it is grasped in Brussels.This
  • Advertisement

  • Our mentally ill daughter was left to die | Letters

    Our daughter was sent to a brutal, chaotic and uncaring place 200 miles from home, writes one parent, while Keir Harding writes about how fear and neglect can prompt aggression in sufferersWe were absolutely horrified to read about the emergency mental health response in the Bradford area (70 years of the NHS, 23 May) and the claim that there have been no “out of area” placements in its first year of operation. When our daughter needed this service, it was only available to those ove
  • Home Office criticised for failures in reforms to criminal records vetting

    Disclosure and Barring Service revamp is four years late and £230m over budget, say MPsThe Home Office has been accused of running a “masterclass in incompetence” over its attempts to improve the criminal records checking scheme.Parliament’s public spending watchdog said a programme to modernise the Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) has been marred by poor planning, delays and spiralling costs.Continue reading...
  • Senate approves bill to overhaul system for reporting sexual harassment

    Bill eliminates mandatory ‘cooling off’ periods for handling claims and requires lawmakers to repay the treasury for settlementsThe Senate gave swift approval on Thursday to a bill that revamps the system for handling sexual harassment complaints on Capitol Hill. The bill eliminates mandatory waiting periods for handling claims and requires lawmakers to repay the treasury for harassment settlements.Related: Eight women allege sexual harassment at XPO Logistics warehouse in MemphisCon
  • Harassment rife in chambers and courts, barristers group says

    Behind the Gown initiative launched to help exploited lawyers fight abuse of power
    Barristers’ chambers and courts are plagued with sexual harassment, bullying and abuse of power, according to a group dedicated to delivering justice to exploited lawyers.The inaugural meeting of Behind the Gown, held in central London on Wednesday evening, heard complaints of inappropriate behaviour and discriminatory conduct by judges, QCs and senior lawyers. Related: Barristers in England and Wales 'in gr
  • Advertisement

  • What happens if Ireland votes no to abortion? Views from both sides | Katherine Zappone, John Bruton and others

    The referendum on repealing Ireland’s eighth amendment takes place tomorrow. Our panellists have their say Related: The Guardian view on the abortion referendum: Ireland’s choice will have a global impact | EditorialRelated: The UK ignored the Irish abortion question for too long – it was a failure of solidarityContinue reading...
  • Share your views about sexual consent apps and the law

    Sexual consent laws in Sweden are changing and there has been a rise in the use of consent apps – we would like to hear your views
    Sweden has passed new legislation that recognises sex without explicit consent is rape. Related: Sweden plans change in law to require explicit consent before sexual contactContinue reading...
  • 'It’s wrong to stink up other people’s lives': fighting the manure lagoons of North Carolina

    Pigs outstripped people in Duplin county long ago - but now the residents are fighting back
    Two poles that once hoisted a clothes line stand rusting and unused in Elsie Herring’s back garden in eastern North Carolina. Herring lives next door to a field where pig manure is sprayed and the drifting faecal matter wasn’t kind to her drying clothes.“The clothes would stink so you’d wash them again and again until they fell apart,” said Herring, whose family has lived in
  • Spotify to pay out $112m in royalties to songwriters after settlement

    The streaming company will recompense songwriters not paid enough royalties, but one unhappy music publisher claims ruling is ‘a free pass on wilful infringement’Spotify will pay out $112m (£83.5m) in a settlement agreement, following two lawsuits that claimed songwriters hadn’t been paid enough in royalties for their work being streamed on the service.The class action, a combination of the two lawsuits, originally came from David Lowery, an musicians’ rights advoca
  • Trump blocked me on Twitter. Not any more | Holly Figueroa O'Reilly

    As well as missing important announcements on Twitter, I’ve had to forfeit my right to dissent. A court ruling changes thatFor the first time, a federal court has ruled that President Donald Trump is in violation of US citizen’s first amendment rights. Was it because he was silencing the media? Not for lack of trying, but no. Was it because he was handing down dictums from on high about whether football players should be able to kneel or not? Nope!It’s because he blocks politic
  • Trayvon Martin's parents: 'The Weinstein Company owes us $150,000'

    Sybrina Fulton and Tracy Martin claim production company failed to pay option fee after entering into deal to purchase rights to book about their son’s killing in 2012The parents of Trayvon Martin, the Florida teenager shot dead while walking home from a convenience store by George Zimmerman, have claimed they are owed at least $150,000 (£110,000) by the Weinstein Company.According to documents filed by Sybrina Fulton and Tracy Martin in a Delaware bankruptcy court, the company forme
  • Virginia school board violated rights of transgender teen, judge rules

    In a major victory for trans rights, judge declines board’s request to dismiss case filed by former student Gavin GrimmA federal judge on Tuesday sided with a transgender teen in Virginia who claims a school board violated his rights when it banned him from using boys’ bathrooms.In a major victory for trans rights, US district court Judge Arenda Wright Allen declined the Gloucester county school board’s request to dismiss the case filed by former student Gavin Grimm. Related: W
  • Pussycat Dolls sue Daily Mail owner over 'prostitution ring' story

    Former girl group member Kaya Jones claimed members were used for sex by music executives – the group has now sued the Mail’s parent company for publishing her remarksGirl group Pussycat Dolls are suing the parent company of the Daily Mail, after an article was published in which former member Kaya Jones said the group was a “prostitution ring”, where members were given drugs and “passed around” music industry executives for sex.The lawsuit, filed by the band&
  • Birmingham woman jailed for duping daughter into forced marriage

    Mother gets four-and-a-half-year sentence for forcing girl, 17, to wed man in Pakistan, in landmark convictionA woman from Birmingham has been jailed for four and a half years for duping her 17-year-old daughter into travelling to Pakistan and forcing her to marry a man 16 years her senior. The 45-year-old, who cannot be named for legal reasons, was found guilty on two counts of forced marriage and a third charge of perjury. The jury returned a not guilty verdict for a further charge of perverti
  • Georgia accuses Russia of war crimes during 2008 conflict

    Tbilisi also alleges human rights violations in closing evidence at European courtGeorgia has accused Russia of war crimes, human rights violations and a “rampage” across Georgian territory during the bitter military conflict between the countries almost 10 years ago.In closing evidence before the European court of human rights in Strasbourg on Wednesday, the Georgian government said Moscow was guilty of multiple violations during the August 2008 fighting. Continue reading...
  • Venezuela has fallen to a dictator. But we can help to restore democracy | Reynaldo Trombetta

    Nicolás Maduro has brought the country to its knees. The international community must support Venezuelans trying to restore democracyThe descent of Venezuela into a dictatorship has resembled the fable of the boy that cried wolf. Back in July 2000, when Hugo Chávez won his first re-election, many in the opposition, surprised by his sudden rise in popularity, claimed electoral fraud. Since then, it seems, the norm has been for the opposition to accuse the government of stealing elec
  • The next Homeland? The problems with Fauda, Israel's brutal TV hit

    The Netflix smash – about a ruthless Israeli unit hunting down terrorists – has been praised for its evenhanded portrayal of the Palestinian conflict. But are there glaring omissions?Israel’s biggest TV hit series returns to our screens this week, opening with Israel’s biggest nightmare. The second series of Fauda, the political thriller about an Israeli army undercover unit, begins with a bomb explosion at a bus stop. But it gets worse, as it turns out the attack wasn&rs
  • Our laws make slaves of nature. It’s not just humans who need rights | Marina Margil

    For decades our laws have been a death sentence for the environment. Now, from the Amazon to Australia, the tide is turningThe Amazon rainforest is often called the earth’s lungs, and generates 20% of the world’s oxygen. Yet in the past half-century nearly a fifth of it has been cut down. The felling and burning of millions of trees is releasing massive amounts of carbon, in turn depleting the Amazon’s capacity to be one of the world’s largest carbon sinks – the nat
  • Our laws make slaves of nature. It’s not just humans who need rights | Mari Margil

    For decades our laws have been a death sentence for the environment. Now, from the Amazon to Australia, the tide is turningThe Amazon rainforest is often called the earth’s lungs, and generates 20% of the world’s oxygen. Yet in the past half-century nearly a fifth of it has been cut down. The felling and burning of millions of trees is releasing massive amounts of carbon, in turn depleting the Amazon’s capacity to be one of the world’s largest carbon sinks – the nat
  • Rohingya militants massacred Hindus in Myanmar, says Amnesty

    Human rights group says accountability for atrocities is just as crucial as for security forces’ crimesThe Rohingya military group Arsa carried out deadly massacres and abductions of the Hindu community in Myanmar’s Rakhine state last year, a new report by Amnesty International has revealed.Testimony collected by Amnesty from dozens of witnesses and survivors of the attacks in Rakhine in August have detailed how up to 99 Hindu men, women and children were killed by Arsa militants arm
  • Secret evidence leads to downgrade of convictions over Stoke shooting

    CPS lawyer says there is no satisfactory explanation for not disclosing material earlierSecret evidence that was not disclosed at trial has led to the overturning of the convictions of five men for conspiracy to murder following a shooting in Stoke-on-Trent in 2010.
    Although the court of appeal imposed alternative convictions for the lesser offence of conspiracy to commit grievous bodily harm, the men and their lawyers still do not know what the new material reveals. Continue reading...
  • 'Plainly unconstitutional': New Orleans jail records inmates' calls to lawyers

    Prosecutors in the city can and do listen in to conversations that elsewhere are seen as subject to attorney-client privilegeWhen Gerard Howard was arrested on suspicion of heroin possession, in 2015, the New Orleans district attorney’s office had a problem. The syringe he was found with came back from the lab with no illegal substances detected.
    Prosecutors wanted to convict Howard on paraphernalia charges but there was no proof the needle was intended to be used for anything illicit. So
  • Right to see Parole Board decisions comes into force

    Law change in England and Wales prompted by row over proposed release of serial sex attacker John WorboysMembers of the public will be able to request summaries of Parole Board decisions on whether prisoners are safe to release under a law change prompted by the handling of the case of serial sex attacker John Worboys.The Parole Board was previously unable to tell victims or the public the reasons why it had decided whether or not to release a prisoner.Continue reading...
  • MPs push for Myanmar regime to face international criminal court

    International development select committee also supports review of UK aid and application of financial sanctions The UK must support efforts to refer Myanmar’s regime to the international criminal court over evidence of state-sanctioned ethnic cleansing of Rohingya people and human rights abuses, according to MPs on the international development select committee.They also called for a complete review of UK aid to Myanmar, which was worth £100m in 2018, saying the sums were agreed at
  • Data protection and the NHS | Letters

    Jon Baines says NHS trusts and others misunderstand the General Data Protection Regulation, Richard Stallman says personal data is only harmless when not collected, and John Chen of BlackBerry says individuals should own their own dataThe General Data Protection Regulation does not require organisations to contact consumers to obtain approval for further communications (however the contact details were originally collected). And it certainly doesn’t require NHS trusts to “get explici
  • Further arrests of Saudi women's rights activists in escalating crackdown

    Ten leading campaigners reportedly held as media denounce women as ‘traitors’ for supporting end to ban on female driversAt least 10 prominent Saudi activists, mostly women’s rights campaigners, have now been reported to have been arrested in what appears to be an escalating clampdown ahead of the much-vaunted lifting of the prohibition on women driving in the kingdom on 24 June.The arrests, with more feared by human rights campaigners, come amid a high-profile campaign in Saud
  • Vague guidance won’t stop women being forced to wear heels and makeup | Anna Macey

    The government’s bland advice on sexist dress codes misses an opportunity to take on this serious problemIn 2015 Nicola Thorp was sent home from work as a receptionist at a corporate accountancy firm without pay after refusing to wear high heels. Thorp started a petition to make it unlawful for employers to insist on high heels, which achieved sufficient signatures to require a parliamentary debate. The women and equalities committee decided to investigate sexist dress codes generally, and
  • This report on the British sex trade is a heartbreaking wake-up call | Sophie Walker

    The violence, coercion and powerlessness that women suffer has been laid bare – the law must now change to protect them“You know when you buy something and it doesn’t work properly, the first thing you will do is pick it up and shake it. The same principle applies to prostitution. If your mouth isn’t open wide enough or your throat isn’t deep enough. So you are always at risk of being raped or abused if the buyer feels he is not getting what he paid for.”Mia d
  • Let’s criminalise the men buying sex, and spare the women they exploit | Sophie Walker

    A new report lays bare the brutal realities of life for sex workers in Britain. The law must now change to protect them“You know when you buy something and it doesn’t work properly, the first thing you will do is pick it up and shake it. The same principle applies to prostitution. If your mouth isn’t open wide enough or your throat isn’t deep enough. So you are always at risk of being raped or abused if the buyer feels he is not getting what he paid for.”Mia de Faoi
  • Detoxifying social media would be easier than you might think | William Perrin

    To find the tools to clamp down on online misogyny, racism and bullying, parliament needs to look to the pastIt’s great that Matt Hancock and Sajid Javid have said they will regulate the internet, but what could they actually do? The culture secretary said that when he called in representatives of 14 leading internet companies to discuss his ideas, only four turned up.The government said it will introduce new laws to tackle “the full range of online harm”. This must mean dealin
  • The Guardian view on the Grenfell Tower inquiry: necessary but not sufficient | Editorial

    An obsession with deregulation of building fire regulations meant warning signs of looming disaster seem to have been missed on the watch of Conservative ministersThe public inquiry into the Grenfell Tower fire finally begins this week with a fortnight of testimony from friends and relatives of the 71 people who died in the terrible blaze on the night of 14 June 2018. The blackened shell of the 24-storey tower has become a symbol of the inequalities of Britain. Almost a year on, there remains a
  • Home Office faces pressure over deportation of highly skilled migrants

    MPs and member of Lords make separate calls for end to ‘repugnant’ use of paragraph 322(5) of immigration lawA group of about 20 MPs and a member of the House of Lords are to establish separate pressure groups to persuade the Home Office to stop deporting highly skilled migrants using a paragraph of the immigration rules designed to tackle terrorism and people judged to be a threat to national security. Lord Dick Taverne, QC, in a letter to the Guardian, says he will launch a campaig
  • Democrat McCaskill defends no vote on Trump CIA pick – but can't say why

    Missouri senator opposed Haspel for ‘classified’ reasonRepublican Cotton: McCaskill ‘reflexively opposed’ to TrumpSenator Claire McCaskill of Missouri has defended her vote against Donald Trump’s pick for CIA director, but said the specific reasons for it were classified. McCaskill was one of the few Democrats facing a difficult re-election this fall to oppose the nomination of Gina Haspel, who was confirmed by the Senate on Thursday after a heated debate about her
  • The Observer view on the global threat to access to abortion |Observer editorial

    Women’s reproductive rights are under widespread threat, not least in America. This is no time for complacencyDuring his eight years in the White House, one of the themes President Obama frequently reflected on in speeches was the non-linear nature of social progress. “Progress doesn’t travel in a straight line,” he told Rutgers students in his commencement address in 2016. “It remains uneven and at times for every two steps forward, it feels like we take one step b
  • Country diary: 'I’ve never needed a permit to go for a walk in England before'

    Easton Hornstocks, Northamptonshire: A thousand years ago, mastiffs were allowed here if their front claws had been removed. Now it’s a national nature reserve, all dogs are bannedThe dawn light astonishes but mostly it’s the smell: sharp, delicate, wild garlic, the last of the bluebells, dewy grass. Dappled light is spilled up the trees and on the ground, and swirls, as the leaves casting it sway, like reflections off water. Silver birch limbs, knotted with birch polypore fungus, li
  • Guernsey parliament votes against assisted dying

    Proposal sought to restrict euthanasia to people with less than six months to live and full mental capacityAn attempt to legalise assisted dying in Guernsey has been defeated in the island’s parliament after a three-day debate.Members of the legislature voted against a requete – similar to a private member’s bill – proposed by Guernsey’s chief minister, Gavin St Pier. A series of votes on different clauses were lost decisively.Continue reading...
  • Nobody’s fault: why does the state trap people in unhappy marriages? | Jo Edwards

    Introducing a no-fault system for divorce would free partners from apportioning blame for the breakdown of their marriageThis week has seen the unedifying spectacle of a wife who wishes to exit her marriage, Tini Owens, taking her fight to be able to do so to the highest court in the land. Many have questioned why the state should have any say in such personal affairs. In England and Wales, there were about 107,000 divorces in 2016. The legal test for whether someone is entitled to a decree of d
  • Surgery left Anna White unable to move – now she can stand and talk

    White sustained severe physical disabilities after an appendix operation, but has made a remarkable recoveryAnna White was 15 when medical negligence left her facing a lifetime stuck inside her body, unable to walk or talk, and communicating only by blinking at letters on a Perspex board.White sustained a major brain injury in 2011 during what should have been routine appendix surgery at Wigan’s Royal Albert Edward infirmary. While her intellectual capacity was unimpaired by the injury, An
  • Windrush victim's mother accuses UK government of racism

    Sentina Bristol says her son died after struggle to prove his legal status to the Home OfficeThe mother of one of the victims of the Windrush scandal who died unexpectedly in March has accused the government of racism and said it still doesn’t “really care” about what happened.Dexter Bristol, whose funeral was held at Honor Oak crematorium in south-east London on Thursday afternoon, died suddenly on 31 March following a 10-month battle to prove he was not an illegal immigrant.
  • The Guardian view on fixed-odds betting terminals: the bookies lose, at last | Editorial

    The promise to slash the maximum stake is welcome – but more must be done to tackle problem gamblingThe government’s promise to slash the maximum stake for fixed-odds betting terminals (FOBTs) from £100 to just £2 is both welcome and long overdue. Matt Hancock, the digital, culture, media and sport secretary, was right to describe the UK’s 33,000 machines as a “social blight” preying on some of the most vulnerable in society.A bit of fun? A little flutte
  • Why are for-profit US prisons subjecting detainees to forced labor? | Azadeh Shahshani

    Private prisons have for years enriched themselves by exploiting detained immigrant labor. They must be held accountableIn 2017, officials at the Stewart immigration detention center in Georgia placed Shoaib Ahmed, a 24-year-old immigrant from Bangladesh, in solitary confinement for encouraging fellow workers to stop working.Ahmed, who was paid 50 cents per hour to work within the facility, was upset because his $20 paycheck was delayed. His punishment was solitary confinement for 10 days, where
  • Why are for-profit US prisons subjecting detainees to forced labor? | Azadeh Shahshahani

    Private prisons have for years enriched themselves by exploiting detained immigrant labor. They must be held accountableIn 2017, officials at the Stewart immigration detention center in Georgia placed Shoaib Ahmed, a 24-year-old immigrant from Bangladesh, in solitary confinement for encouraging fellow workers to stop working.Ahmed, who was paid 50 cents per hour to work within the facility, was upset because his $20 paycheck was delayed. His punishment was solitary confinement for 10 days, where
  • 12 years in jail for shoplifting: how Walmart is helping prosecutors hike up sentences

    The case of a man facing 12 years in prison for shoplifting shows a growing trend in America: corporations successfully pushing state prosecutors to increase shoplifting charges to feloniesIt was late afternoon on 26 December 2016 – the day after Christmas, a day when most stores are busy processing the returns for unwanted gifts – when Curtis Lawson entered a Walmart in Knoxville, Tennessee. He had a receipt for $39.57 in purchases made earlier that month. He needed cash. He walked

Follow @Justice_News_UK on Twitter!