• Home Office issues visa to stranded Royal Navy pilot's wife

    American Marianne Rawlins, who was initially denied right to join husband in Britain, receives apology for ‘inconvenience’The Home Office has issued a visa and apologised to the wife of a Royal Navy pilot left stranded in the US while her husband serves in the UK.Marianne Rawlins, 34, has been granted a UK visa to join her husband, Lt Simon Rawlins, after the UK Visa and Immigration department initially ruled her application was not straightforward and required extra information. Con
  • Boeing broadens bet on autonomous tech with new partnership

    Building off its recent Aurora Flight Sciences acquisition, Boeing is investing in Near Earth Autonomy, a Pennsylvania-based company focusing on autonomous flight.
  • A brief history of placement: how one student helped Stephen Hawking find his voice

    Stephen Hawking is arguably the world’s most famous scientist, and a student at Huddersfield University has made sure he keeps his famous synthesised voice plus the ability to communicate his ideas.
    Paweł Woźniak & Prof Stephen HawkingPaweł Woźniak, who is completing his Bachelor of Engineering degree at Huddersfield University, earned a year’s work placement year with Intel in Swindon and his varied responsibilities included an assignment to visit Prof Hawkin
  • Optical receiver promises super-fast broadband in every home

    Super-fast broadband speeds of over 10,000 megabits-per-second to every home could be made possible with new optical receiver technology developed in the UK.Broadband speeds in the UK consistently lag behind other countries, averaging just 36 Mbps. By 2025, speeds up to 100 times faster will be needed to meet the bandwidth demands of technologies such as ultra-high definition video and online gaming.
    The receiver is designed to be used in optical access networks, which link internet users with t
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  • Designing a mechanical rover to explore the surface of Venus

    Our hellish nearest planetary neighbour could help us determine where life might exist in the universe. But to explore Venus, we’ll need to go back to basics. Stuart Nathan reports
    Artist’s impression of the hellish surface of VenusSuch is our fascination with Mars that it’s easy to assume that it’s our closest neighbour. The subject of songs, books and films, the Red Planet has been intensely studied by orbiting probes, landers and rovers. It’s currently the only b
  • View from the Academy: Looking ahead to the year of engineering

    A series of events next year will build on efforts to engage the next generation of engineers, says Hayaatan Sillem
    At the end of September, some 30,000 people visited London’s ExCel to get a sneak peek into the future. With talks and exhibitions on everything from the practicalities of moving to Mars to the prospects of using DNA for data storage, New Scientist Live set out to challenge, puzzle and entertain its audience in equal measure. This show, now in its second year, is just one ex
  • Smartphone diagnosis via card-mounted lab-on-a-chip differentiates similar viruses

    A multidisciplinary US team develops a system to rapidly, cheaply and accurately diagnose diseases with similar symptoms
    Infectious disease is still the biggest causes of human death and disability worldwide, and are a particularly acute problem in developing countries where easy access to clinics equipped with up-to-date diagnostic equipment is often limited. But the rapid spread of smartphones has put advanced technology into the hands of many more people, and leveraging their capabilities for
  • Good vibrations: wearables add security to voice activated devices

    Vulnerabilities in voice authentication could be eradicated with wearable devices that register speech-induced vibrations on the user’s body and pairs them with the sound of that person’s voice.
    VAuth voice verification technology (credit: Joseph Xu)Voice activated systems in mobile devices, homes and vehicles are becoming more widespread but sound is an open-channel and such systems can be breached by third parties via mediocre impersonators and sophisticated hackers alike.
    To count
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  • Royal Navy pilot's wife left homeless in US by Home Office delays

    American Marianne Rawlins is sleeping on friends’ couches while she waits for visa to join decorated serviceman in UKThe wife of a Royal Navy pilot who has served his country for more than 20 years and clocked up over 400 flying hours during his service in Afghanistan is trapped in the US while he serves in the UK because the Home Office won’t give her a visa to join her husband.Marianne Rawlins, 34, said she was now homeless after her husband, Lt Simon Rawlins, nicknamed Top Gun by
  • Video of the week: meet China’s answer to Big Dog

    Engineers at Chinese robotics startup Unitree Robotics have unveiled a four legged robot that bears an uncanny resemblance to the Big Dog and Spot technologies developed by US robotics pioneer Boston Dynamics.Named Laikago (after the Soviet space dog Laika) the robot is able to walk on surfaces ranging from stony ground to grassy slopes, and also boasts a neat stability system that enables it recover from being kicked.
    Despite the outward resemblance, the Chinese robot is a simpler device than B
  • ​ADEX: Boeing, KAL eye Korean Chinook upgrade opportunity

    Boeing and Korean Air have entered a memorandum of understanding related to Seoul's plan to upgrade its aging fleet of CH-47D Chinook transport helicopters.
  • Mars explorers could breathe oxygen made by plasma

    Existing cold-plasma technology could convert Martian CO2 atmosphere into breathable oxygen for astronauts, says Portuguese study.
    Astronauts on Mars could breathe air made from the local atmosphere using cold plasmaResearchers from Lisbon and Porto Universities believe that future crewed missions to Mars could make their own oxygen for exploring the surface from the local atmosphere. “Sending a manned mission to Mars is one of the next major steps in our exploration of space. Creating a b
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  • Skills and automation dominate industry talk at party conferences

    Paul Jackson trawled the Labour and Conservative party conferences for signs of a joined-up and coherent industrial strategy. 
    Industrial strategy, a dodo of public policy at the end of the 20th Century, is back very firmly in the political dictionary but do we really know what it means?
    I went to the two big party conferences to search for the substance behind the rhetoric when Labour gathered in Brighton and the Conservatives hit Manchester, trawling the fringe meetings for substance from
  • Aerospace Integration Research Centre officially opened at Cranfield

    The £35m Aerospace Integration Research Centre (AIRC) has been officially opened at Cranfield University.
    Cranfield AIRC centreThe new facility has been co-funded by Airbus, Rolls-Royce and Cranfield University, plus the Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE).
    According to Cranfield, the Centre will conduct research into ways of integrating advanced technologies to reduce the time from academic innovation to industrial application.
    To enable this, the AIRC has been equipped w
  • World’s first floating wind farm delivers electricity to grid

    The world’s first floating wind farm has started to deliver electricity to the Scottish grid.Comprising six 5MW floating turbines, the 30MW Hywind Scotland project is located 25km offshore from Peterhead in Aberdeenshire, Scotland and will provide power for approximately 20,000 households. The £190m Hywind project is operated by Statoil in partnership with Masdar.
    “Hywind can be used for water depths up to 800m, thus opening up areas that so far have been inaccessible for offsh
  • The Engineer drives: Honda Civic Type R is a fast piece of work

    Chris Pickering gets to grips with the Honda Civic Type R, the fastest front-wheel-drive production car to lap the fearsome Nürburgring Nordschleife
    Decked out with more vents and spoilers than a Friday night in a McDonald’s drive-through , the new Honda Civic Type R could never be accused of hiding its light under a bushel. But what you see here is the real deal. It’s the fastest front-wheel-drive production car ever to lap the fearsome Nürburgring Nordschleife. Find a lon
  • Highest-power biological solar cell offers potential for medical devices in remote regions

    Based on bacteria, paper and carbon fibre, the biological solar cell generates energy in a similar way to the Earth’s ecosystem
    Choi’s micro-BSC assembly is compact and self-maintainingThe cells were developed by a team at Binghampton University, part of the State University of New York, and is intended specifically for powering lab-on-a-chip diagnostic devices, said research leader Seokheun Choi.
    Such devices need a self-contained clean power source, and miniaturised biological sola
  • Flexible sensor skin gives robots a sense of dexterity

    Robots could soon handle objects with the same dexterity as humans thanks to a flexible sensor skin developed by engineers from the University of Washington and UCLA.
    Bio-inspired sensor skin wraps around a finger or any other part of a robot to help convey touch (credit: UCLA Engineering)The skin can be stretched over any part of a robot’s body – or prosthetic – to accurately convey information about shear forces and vibration that are critical to grasping and manipulating obj
  • MasterChef inspires Highways England funded self-healing road project

    An episode of MasterChef inspired a researcher from the University Nottingham to develop a new technology for repairing cracks in road surfaces.After watching a contestant on the Spanish version of the show use a technique known as spherification (the controlled jellification of a liquid to form spheres), Dr Alvaro Garcia, from the Nottingham Transportation Engineering Centre (NTEC), began exploring how the addition of microcapsules of oil to asphalt could be used to create self-repairing road s
  • ​ADEX: KAI unveils medevac version of Surion

    The medical evacuation version of the Korea Aerospace Industries (KAI) KUH-1 Surion helicopter made its public debut at this year's Seoul ADEX show.
  • ADEX: Sikorsky upbeat on MH-60R in South Korean competition

    Sikorsky believes a more complicated security environment bodes well for its MH-60R helicopter in South Korea's second Maritime Operations Helicopter (MOH) competition.
  • ​ADEX: Bell eyes Korean training, attack helo requirements

    Bell Helicopter expects a decision to come soon in a South Korean competition for 41 training helicopters.
  • ​ADEX: Big MPAs hunt for Seoul maritime requirement

    Industry players expect South Korea to issue a formal requirement for new antisubmarine warfare (ASW) aircraft.
  • Armour-plated protection through the ages: five innovations from The Engineer archive

    The prospect of imminent annihilation is a great motivator and the correlation between warfare and technological advance is well known and documented.
    The development of armour is no different in this respect and The Engineer has taken a keen interest in the materials and processes used to afford protection to the weapons of war, be they horses, boats, tanks or trains.
    Here, we look back at five developments designed to give armoured protection to combatants on land and at sea.
    Cruickshank&rsquo
  • Amour plated protection through the ages: five innovations from The Engineer archive

    The prospect of imminent annihilation is a great motivator and the correlation between warfare and technological advance is well known and documented.
    The development of armour is no different in this respect and The Engineer has taken a keen interest in the materials and processes used to afford protection to the weapons of war, be they horses, boats, tanks or trains.
    Here, we look back at five developments designed to give armoured protection to combatants on land and at sea.
    Cruickshank&rsquo
  • They’ve suffered enough. But now veterans are battling universal credit, too | Dawn Foster

    As well as mental illness, ex-soldiers like Joe are having to fight a flawed new benefits system, increasing their risk of homelessnessFor six years, Joe Greensmith, 52, served in the British Army’s Coldstream Guards. After enlisting in 1989, he served in the Gulf war, as well as completing a tour of Northern Ireland and Bosnia during the Srebrenica massacre in 1995. On discharge from the army, Greensmith, a qualified sprinkler engineer, worked for over 10 years installing sprinklers in ma
  • Bahrain says it signed $3.8 bn deal for F-16 fighter jets

    Bahrain on Tuesday announced it had signed a $3.8 billion deal with Lockheed Martin for 16 upgraded F-16 fighter jets. The Bahrain Defence Force signed the agreement with the US company during a...
    This is summary only, please visit DefenceTalk.com for more defense news, discussion and military pictures!
  • Echoes of war as South Korean grannies on protest front lines

    A powerful US missile system installed in South Korea to defend it from the nuclear-armed North made international headlines this year. But the stars of a film about the project are the grandmothers...
    This is summary only, please visit DefenceTalk.com for more defense news, discussion and military pictures!
  • Boeing taps Aurora exec to lead Phantom Works

    Boeing Defense, Space and Security (BDS) has appointed a top executive from newly-acquired Aurora Flight Sciences to lead the compnay s elite technology development and rapid prototyping unit called the Phantom Works.
  • ​State Department approves F-16V sale to Greece

    The US State Department has approved a potential Block IV upgrade for Greece s current fleet of Lockheed Martin F-16 aircraft, worth an estimated $2.4 billion.
  • Scifi Eye: The imaginary prospects of future money

    Scifi novelist Jon Wallace looks at the vital role that an imagined currency can play in a future alternate world
    Money is a simple method by which scifi writers establish the world of their stories. Our dependence on and hunger for currency has helped define human history since around 700BC; we can hardly imagine society without it, and so naturally it plays a crucial role in story, as corrupting motive or hunted treasure.
    Crucially, creating an entirely new, imagined currency helps to establi
  • News story: F-35 jet cleared for Carrier take-off, Defence Minister tells Select Committee

    The UK’s cutting-edge F-35 fighter jet is now cleared for take-off from HMS Queen Elizabeth following successful trials using the ski-ramp design featured on the UK flagship, Defence Minister Harriett Baldwin announced at the House of Commons Defence Select Committee this afternoon.Defence Minister Harriett Baldwin said:Successful ski-ramp trials mean the F-35 is cleared to fly from the carrier as the momentum continues for this game-changing jet. This milestone comes as our pilots and pla
  • News story: Two World War 1 soldiers have finally been identified a century later

    Rededication services for 2 fallen World War 1 soldiers have been held today (Tuesday 17 October 2017) in Ypres, Belgium. The first for Rifleman William Dickson Evans of The King’s (Liverpool Regiment) at Blauwepoort Farm Commonwealth War Graves Commission Cemetery. The second for Private John Anderson of the 4th Battalion Gordon Highlanders at Birr Cross Roads Commonwealth War Graves Commission Cemetery.Both services, organised by the MOD’s Joint Casualty and Compassionate Centre (J
  • Chromatography techniques yield rare earth elements from coal ash

    New chromatography separation techniques could extract rare earth elements from waste coal ash and help introduce the US to a market worth $4bn.
    Linda Wang, Purdue University’s Maxine Spencer Nichols Professor of Chemical EngineeringRare earth elements (REE) consist largely of Lanthanides (Lns) – a series of 15 metallic elements – and the value of products requiring them is estimated at over $4 trillion per year.
    “REEs have many important applications in things such as pe
  • Undisclosed buyer adds to Super Tucano backlog

    Embraer has announced a new order for six of its armed A-29 Super Tucano, but declines to identify the latest customer to have committed to the type.
  • Liquid metal morphing makes shapes for robotics

    A method for forcing blobs of liquid metal to form programmable shapes could have startling applications
    Researchers from Sussex and Swansea Universities have invented a method for morphing a liquid metal into two-dimensional shapes that can be changed seamlessly. While some way off from the morphing liquid metal robot that terrified audiences in the film Terminator 2, the technique could be useful in reconfigurable electronics, in displays and in soft robotics, the team said.
    The blob of EGaIn
  • Airbus Bombardier C-Series deal could save Belfast jobs

    Airbus is to acquire a majority stake in Bombardier’s C-Series aircraft business, potentially shoring up thousands of UK jobs put at risk by a recent US decision to impose sharp import tariffs on the aircraft.Under the agreement, Airbus will acquire a 50.01 per cent stake in the C- Series Aircraft Limited Partnership (CSALP) whilst Bombardier will own approximately 31 per cent of the business.
    Whilst Airbus has acquired its stake without handing over any money, access to the aerospace gian
  • ​ADEX: KAI vows recovery as it eyes FA-50 deals

    Despite troubles at home, Korea Aerospace Industries (KAI) is as committed as ever to international sales, and expects an order for up to 12 FA-50s in the first half of 2018.
  • Interview: GKN Driveline chief executive Phil Swash

    Phil Swash, CEO of GKN Driveline speaks to Jon Excell about the current “golden age” of automotive engineering. 
    There are rarely many big surprises at car shows these days.
    While once upon a time manufacturers waited for the exhibition hall doors to open before performing the big reveal, today’s events are typically robbed of their drama by months of pre-show hype.
    Nevertheless, they do still provide a useful indication of the sector’s direction of travel. And at th
  • This week’s poll: Protecting UK strategic industries

    Do new proposals to prevent strategic industries in the UK being bought up by overseas interests go far enough?
    Take Our PollBusiness secretary Greg Clark has announced new proposals to prevent manufacturers in strategic industrial sectors from being bought up by foreign interests. The proposals apply to manufacturers in two sectors: the ‘dual use’ and military sector, whose products are already subject to export controls; and companies involved in the design of computer chips and qu
  • ADEX: USAF sends message to Pyongyang at Seoul show

    The United States Air Force has made an impressive show of force that this year's Seoul ADEX defence show, bringing four stealth fighters and several other aircraft.
  • Plasmonic nanoantenna arrays hold promise for ultrasensitive sensors

    Researchers have designed and tested plasmonic nanoantenna arrays that could lead to the development of ultrasensitive and low-cost fluorescence sensors for water monitoring.
    SEM images of nanoantenna array and in the inset a magnified view of the array elements (Credit: Bristol University)The breakthrough has been made by researchers at the Universities of Bristol and Bedfordshire in collaboration with ABB.
    The arrays, designed and tested by Dr Neciah Dorh during his PhD at Bristol University,
  • Russia eyes new military variants of Mi-38 helicopter

    Russia may develop medevac and electronic warfare (EW) variants of the Mil Mi-38 helicopter, but has so far ruled out an armed model.
  • How should you react when management has its head in the sand?

    There are few things more irritating  than a senior management team that wilfully ignores sensible advice writes our anonymous blogger. 
    A few years back I had a constant battle with keeping my temper at work. I was suffering from a building rage that came from fighting a steady battle over a number of years but finding my efforts constantly dismissed or thwarted.
    Ours was a small company with less than 10 members of senior staff and by this stage it was a company and team that I&rsquo
  • Kier joins MTC to help in delivery of future infrastructure projects

    Kier has joined the Manufacturing Technology Centre, a move intended to help the company work on R&D that will assist in delivering construction and infrastructure projects.
    Kier innovation director Mark Austin and MTC chief executive Dr Clive HickmanThe company, which employs 21,000 employees across the UK, has identified augmented reality, robotics, 3D printing, and MTC process analysis as areas it will explore and exploit as part of its MTC membership.
    Mark Austin, innovation director, Ki
  • Mantis shrimp eye inspires camera that senses colour and polarization

    Researchers have taken inspiration from the eye of the mantis shrimp to develop an ultra-sensitive camera that can sense colour and polarization.
    Mantis shrimp (Credit: Michael Bok, University of Lund)The bioinspired imager can potentially improve early cancer detection and help provide a new understanding of underwater phenomena, said researchers from the University of Illinois.
    “The animal kingdom is full of creatures with much more sensitive and sophisticated eyes than our own,” s
  • Mantis shrimp eye inspires camera that senses colour and polarisation

    Researchers have taken inspiration from the eye of the mantis shrimp to develop an ultra-sensitive camera that can sense colour and polarisation.
    Mantis shrimp (Credit: Michael Bok, University of Lund)The bioinspired imager can potentially improve early cancer detection and help provide a new understanding of underwater phenomena, said researchers from the University of Illinois.
    “The animal kingdom is full of creatures with much more sensitive and sophisticated eyes than our own,” s
  • October 1955: Radio-controlled tractor gets to work in Surrey

    Ford Motor Company invites The Engineer to observe an unmanned, radio-controlled Fordson Major diesel tractor
    Fordson tractors underwent a series of modifications during their 47 years in production, but it was a non-production version that lured one of our predecessors to a field in Surrey in October 1955.
    Ford Motor Company had invited The Engineer to observe an unmanned, radio-controlled Fordson Major diesel tractor, a technology demonstrator that had been built for use in field tri
  • Particles take rough with the smooth when moving in liquid suspensions

    The surface texture of micro particles in liquid suspensions can cause internal friction that alters the suspension’s viscosity, a finding that could help address problems encountered in the chemical manufacturing industry.
    Rough and smooth particlesThe findings from North Carolina State University, MIT and the University of Michigan are said to represent a fundamental advance in the understanding of suspensions in flow.
    “We heard about problems companies were having with pumping sus
  • Ultrasound-based augmented tongue technology could improve speech therapy

    A novel system that converts ultrasound scans of the movement of the tongue into an augmented reality “talking head” could be used to improve speech-therapy techniques.
    Developed by a team from the National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS) in France the technology uses an ultrasound probe placed under the jaw to scan the movement of the tongue, palate and teeth.  These movements are then processed by a specially-developed machine learning algorithm that controls an “a

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