• GE metal process improves MEMS RF switches

     General Electric's research labs have developed a MEMS RF switch that can be engineered to handle up to 1kW or scaled to provide up to provide less than 0.3dB of insertion loss carrying 3GHz signals.
  • TSMC to equip Nanjing fab this year

    TSMC will start moving equipment into its Nanjing fab in H2, reports Digitimes. The fab will kick off on 16nm. Pilot production is scheduled for H1 2018 with volume production in H2. It is being equipped to run 20k wpm. First 7nm tape-outs at TSMC Taiwan are set for H2 2017. 10nm is already in production. ...
    Read full article: TSMC to equip Nanjing fab this year
  • Samsung takes on Apple Pay

    Samsung has launched its answer to Apple Pay – a contactless payment system it calls  the Contactless Companion Platform (CCP). CCP was built with  Smartlink and Ingenico.  Users can make digital cash payments via any enabled contactless device of their choice, such as a dedicated smart card, wristband, key fob, or even a mechanical watch or a ...
    Read full article: Samsung takes on Apple Pay
  • Infineon increases outlook

    Infineon has  increased the outlook for revenues and Segment Result Margin for its fiscal Q2 2017  and increased the outlook for revenues and Segment Result Margin for the full 2017 fiscal year. The outlook for investment for the full 2017 fiscal year has also been updated. Increased outlook for the second quarter of the 2017 ...
    Read full article: Infineon increases outlook
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  • Ultrahaptics hooks up with MIT

    Ultrahaptics, the mid-air haptic touch specialist,  is collaborating with MIT  on a haptics teaching programme. The course, which has been running since January 2017, is based on Ivan Sutherland’s vision of an “Ultimate Display” – a room that could render data so realistically that it would allow users to interact with information as if it ...
    Read full article: Ultrahaptics hooks up with MIT
  • Cambridge IC reveals sensing detail, on 10th brithday

    Rotary sensing firm CambridgeIC has further lifted the lid on its technology by rendering its coil-based sensing system for 3D viewing. Its sensors require two PCBs, one on the rotating shaft and a static one though which the shaft passes. The two PCBs only need to be made to conventional tolerances – with 0.2mm track ...
    Read full article: Cambridge IC reveals sensing detail, on 10th brithday
  • Cambridge IC reveals sensing detail, on 10th birthday

    Sensing firm CambridgeIC has further lifted the lid on its technology by rendering one of its coil-based rotary sensing systems for 3D viewing. This sensor requires two PCBs, one on the rotating shaft and a static one through which the shaft passes. The two PCBs only need to be made to conventional tolerances – with ...
    Read full article: Cambridge IC reveals sensing detail, on 10th birthday
  • New catalyst promotes artificial photosynthesis

    Scientists have created an oxygen-evolution catalyst that combines with semiconductors for solar water splitting, an advance that assists the conversion of solar energy to chemical energy in the form of hydrogen and oxygen.When evenly applied to a semiconductor, the film catalyses solar water splitting for energy production and other applicationsThe discovery was made in the lab of Kenton Whitmire, a Rice University professor of chemistry, with assistance from researchers at the University of Ho
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  • Laser-fired gold pyramids could help tackle cancer

    Harvard researchers have been able to harmlessly penetrate cancer cells using laser-activated gold nanopyramids.(Credit: Harvard SEAS)
    By heating the tips of the pyramids to 300°C with nanosecond laser pulses, the team created tiny bubbles that could push into cell membranes without causing damage. The brief opening of cell pores allowed surrounding molecules to diffuse into the cell. Published in the journal ACS Nano, the work has wide-ranging implications for healthcare.
    “Being able
  • Graphene helps tactility of solar powered prosthetic skin

    Synthetic skin powered by the sun could give the sense of touch to robots and amputees fitted with prosthetic limbs.
    Dr Ravinder DahiyaResearchers at Glasgow University have developed a new way of generating solar power for robotic and prosthetic limbs using graphene.
    Graphene is an atom-thick layer of material, which includes high conductivity as one of its numerous properties. The researchers have previously used graphene to build a pressure-sensitive electronic skin for prosthetic hands.
    Now,
  • Knowles caps tackle EV charging challenge

    Knowles is aiming at electric and hybrid vehicle charging with a range of X7R multi-layer ceramic capacitors (MLCCs). “The big change being seen in automotive applications is the voltage rating and size of components now being used,” said the firm. “This revolution in MLCC technology, used in control electronics, is being driven by modern on-board ...
    Read full article: Knowles caps tackle EV charging challenge
  • Leti un-picks 5G indoor mm-wave propagation

    French lab Leti has modelled indoor V and E Band millimeter-wave propagation to identigy space for 5G comms. Classic frequency bands for mobile communication below 6GHz cannot meet throughput requirements projected for future needs due to network congestion and limited bandwidth. However, the majority of demand could be met using millimeter-wave (mm-wave) spectrum – with ...
    Read full article: Leti un-picks 5G indoor mm-wave propagation
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  • Four-leg robot spontaneously trots, canters, then gallops

    In an example of emergent behaviour, researchers at Tohoku University have created a control technique that allows a walking robot to spontaneously break into a trot, and then a gallop, as it is commanded to increase speed. The resulting energy-efficiency profile matches horses. There is no central algoritm. Instead, the team, led by Professor Akio ...
    Read full article: Four-leg robot spontaneously trots, canters, then gallops
  • Graphene-based sensor has potential for high-resolution thermal imaging

    Cambridge researchers break record for sensor thermal sensitivity
    The unique electronic properties of graphene can be harnessed in a sensor that could be used for highly sensitive security screening to detect explosives and other hazardous substances, according to research from the Cambridge Graphene Centre. Combining the single-atom-thick carbon with pyroelectric materials, which generate electric fields when heated or cooled, the team has produced a sensor that can detect temperature changes d
  • Rolls-Royce charts course for autonomous shipping

    Rolls-Royce is increasing its investment in technologies for remote and autonomous shipping, after receiving a grant for a research centre in Finland.The company has secured the grant from Tekes, the Finnish funding agency for innovation, which it plans to invest in an R&D centre in Turku, Finland.
    Engineers at the site will carry out development projects focusing on land-based control centres and the use of artificial intelligence (AI) in remote and autonomous shipping.
    There is still very
  • Rolls-Royce chart course for autonomous shipping

    Rolls-Royce is increasing its investment in technologies for remote and autonomous shipping, after receiving a grant for a research centre in Finland.The company has secured the grant from Tekes, the Finnish funding agency for innovation, which it plans to invest in an R&D centre in Turku, Finland.
    Engineers at the site will carry out development projects focusing on land-based control centres and the use of artificial intelligence (AI) in remote and autonomous shipping.
    There is still very
  • Quantum dot solar inefficiency source found

    Quantum dot solar cells could become more efficient, now that the Los Alamos Lab has uncovered a mechanism that has been holding them back. The dots are made form electro-optically active materials whose size as well as composition controls the photon energy that they interact with, allowing their absorption (and emission) wavelength to be tuned ...
    Read full article: Quantum dot solar inefficiency source found
  • Vault7 upside for the electronics industry

    The Vault7 dump of hacking recipes used by the CIA could be a very positive thing for companies who can now check if their equipment is compromised.
    Read full article: Vault7 upside for the electronics industry
  • 3D printed nanomaterials punch above weight

    Researchers from New Hampshire’s Dartmouth College have found a way to 3D print microscopic nanorings into smart materials capable of working on a macro scale.
    Described in the German Chemical Society’s Angewandte Chemie, the technique involves 3D printing gels made from mechanically interlocked molecules (MIMs) – a type of nanomachine composed of rings on a molecular axle. Nobel Prize-winning research has previously shown how MIMs can be induced into nanoscale work using
  • Video of the week: Lean Manufacturing in the digital age

    In this first episode of a new series of videos brought to you by The Engineer and key industry partners, we talk to Damian Hennessey, director of advanced manufacturer Proto Labs, about why that decades-old buzz-phrase Lean Manufacturing has been made doubly relevant by the advent of digital manufacturing techniques and processes.
    To view the Spotlight interview click here or on the picture below.
  • Electric plane company works with Easyjet.

    Wright Electric, which is developing electric passenger aircraft, is working with Easyjet on a plan to develop a 737 type plane for short-haul flights. “Depending on how it’s designed, you can have an electric plane that’s substantially less loud than a fuel plane,” said Jeff Engler, Wright Electric’s co-founder. “the way we’ve designed our plane ...
    Read full article: Electric plane company works with Easyjet.
  • Mythic aims to bring AI to the device

    Texas start-up Mythic has raised $9.3 million in VC money to bring a chip to market which will deliver local processing of AI functions like voice control and computer vision. That is a similar ambition to ARM’s new DynamIQ microarchitecture which, among other things, aims to take AI processing out of the cloud and onto ...
    Read full article: Mythic aims to bring AI to the device
  • More on: Arctic Sand’s novel dc-dc converter technology

    MIT spin-out Arctic Sand has created plenty of interest in the dc-dc converter world – so much so that Murata has just bought the company. But exactly what the firm’s unique technology is, has remained under wraps. Now Electronics Weekly has been given a peep behind the scenes by company CEO Gary Davison. It transpires ...
    Read full article: More on: Arctic Sand’s novel dc-dc converter technology
  • Viewpoint: 3D printing a sustainable future

     George Brasher, MD of HP UK & Ireland, explains why 3D printing has the potential to significantly reduce the waste and emissions of manufacturing. 
    We are on the brink of a 3D printing revolution as it is fast shifting from being used for niche applications, such as developing prototypes or creating specialist parts, into the mainstream. According to PwC, 67 per cent of manufacturers are already using 3D printing in their production systems and this is set to grow exponentially w
  • Southern Manufacturing 2017: Quartz crystals target wireless and IoT

    Crystals announced by Jauch Quartz (J103) - in the JXSxx-WA quartz crystal series - are designed for wireless applications in a variety of settings.
    Read full article: Southern Manufacturing 2017: Quartz crystals target wireless and IoT
  • Microchip launches mobile ordering app

      Microchip has brought out a mobile app for ordering microcontrollers.   microchipDIRECT, which sells parts directly to customers, has been updated with several mobile-accessible features including high-volume quotes, custom programming, ordering flexibility, numerous languages, worldwide currency options and global support.   “microchipDIRECT is providing a B2C-like experience that allows our clients to check product ...
    Read full article: Microchip launches mobile orderin
  • Gallium oxide power device firm gets £5m in second-round funding

    Japanese gallium oxide power device start-up Flosfia has raised Y750m (£5m) in series B funding. http://flosfia.com The firm, a spin-out from the Kyoto University, is aiming to commercialise crystalline α-Ga2O3 (corundum/sapphire/ruby structure) in power transistors and Schottky diodes – with the intention of manufacturing 600V TO-220 diodes in 2018 to compete against silicon carbide power ...
    Read full article: Gallium oxide power device firm gets £5m in second-round fun
  • £300m black cab plant opens in Midlands

    A new facility for manufacturing next generation electric black cabs has been officially opened by the London Taxi Company (LTC).
    The new plant, at Ansty Park near Coventry, is the first all-new vehicle manufacturing facility to be built in Britain for more than a decade and the first dedicated electric vehicle factory in the UK.It will be used to produce range-extended electric vehicles including the next generation London taxi – TX5 – the world’s first purpose-built, mass-mar
  • Falcon flight inspires next generation aircraft

    The Peregrine falcon’s status as elite predator has been enabled in part by its ability to adjust flight patterns at high and low speed, qualities that engineers want to replicate.Scientists at BAE Systems and City, University of London have studied falcon flight and believe that evolution has given Falco peregrinus attributes that could be replicated and applied to aircraft within the next 20 years.
    The scientists say they have developed several concepts following research into how the pe
  • Falcon flight inspires next-gen aircraft

    The Peregrine falcon’s status as elite predator has been enabled in part by its ability to adjust flight patterns at high and low speed, qualities that engineers want to replicate.Scientists at BAE Systems and City, University of London have studied falcon flight and believe that evolution has given Falco peregrinus attributes that could be replicated and applied to aircraft within the next 20 years.
    The scientists say they have developed several concepts following research into how the pe

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