• Semtech aims LoRa gateway at home IoT nets

    Semtech, which was recognised at this week’s Elektra Awards in London, has come up with a reference design for an indoor multi-band picocell basestation incorporating the LoRa long range IoT wireless standard. The reference design is based on Semtech’s SX1308 picocell gateway IC along with the SX1255 or SX1257 LoRa RF transceivers. The likely market is in-the-home internet of things ...
    Read full article: Semtech aims LoRa gateway at home IoT nets
  • Picture Gallery: Elektra Awards 2016 – The Winners

    The Elektra European Electronics Industry Awards 2015 were presented last night, and here are the pictures of all the winners. You can read the full list of winners, with details of the awards – see Elektra Awards 2016: The Winners – but pictures from the Gala Dinner last night, at the Grosvenor House Hotel, follow below ...
    Read full article: Picture Gallery: Elektra Awards 2016 – The Winners
  • Implantable drug delivery device fights cancer while maintaining patients’ health

    An implantable device incorporating nanofluidic technology will allow drugs for cancer and other ailments to be delivered more effectively and without damaging the general health of the patient, thanks to research from the University of Texas, San Antonio.
    The nDSmini nanofluidic device, shown in section and being implanted.The device, developed by Dr Lyle Hood, a mechanical engineer, working with nanotechnology specialist Alessandro Grattoni of Houston Methodist Research Institute, can be used
  • Updated: Diamond nuclear battery could generate 100μW for 5,000 years

    Synthetic diamond made from carbon-14 could become a long-term electrical power source, according to a team at the University of Bristol. “There are no moving parts involved, no emissions generated and no maintenance required, just direct electricity generation,” said Professor Tom Scott of the University’s Interface Analysis Centre. “By encapsulating radioactive material inside diamonds, we ...
    Read full article: Updated: Diamond nuclear battery could generate 100μW f
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  • 3D XPoint SSDs due for volume production in Q2

    3D XPoint, Intel’s ‘new class of memory’, will finally hit the street in Q2 2017 in the form of an SSD reports Digitimes. Engineering samples of the SSD which is branded Optane, have been given to selected customers, it is reported. Mass production is planned in Q2 for the technology which was launched in June ...
    Read full article: 3D XPoint SSDs due for volume production in Q2
  • Australian researchers set Perovskite efficiency record

    Engineers at the University of New South Wales in Sydney have claimed a new efficiency record for perovskite solar cells.
    The team, led by Anita Ho-Baillie, Senior Research Fellow at the Australian Centre for Advanced Photovoltaics (ACAP) demonstrated an efficiency rating of 12.1 per cent on a 16cm² perovskite solar cell. The results, verified by international testing centre Newport Corp, represent the highest efficiency rating with the largest perovskite solar cells to date.
    Anita Ho-Baill
  • BAE Systems opens £15.6m aerospace academy

    A new £15.6m training facility has been officially opened by BAE Systems in Lancashire, marking the largest ever single investment in UK aerospace skills.
    (Credit: Ray Troll)The 7,400m² Academy for Skills & Knowledge (ASK) will provide training for apprentices and graduates, as well as further education and development for long term employees. Located in the Samlesbury Aerospace Enterprise Zone alongside BAE Systems’ military aircraft advanced manufacturing centre, the new f
  • Sussex student wins award for graphene car battery

    A student engineer from the University of Sussex has won the ‘Autocar-Courland Next Generation Award’ for designing a vehicle battery that charges quickly. Josh de Wit, a second-year mechanical engineering student, exploited the qualities of graphene. A car battery made with stacked graphene, according to de Wit, would take far less time to charge, store ...
    Read full article: Sussex student wins award for graphene car battery
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  • Hydrogen production given an edge by molybdenum sulphide

    Researchers have found that molybdenum sulphide (MoS2) could be a more productive as a catalyst for hydrogen production than previously thought.
    The researchers from North Carolina State University, Duke University, NC and Brookhaven National Laboratory, NY found that the entire surface of MoS2 can be used as a catalyst, not just the edges of the material.
    “The key finding here is that the intrinsic catalytic performance of MoS2 is much better than the research community thought,” sa
  • Diamond nuclear battery could generate 100μW for 5,000 years

    Synthetic diamond made from carbon-14 could become a long-term electrical power source, according to a team at the University of Bristol. “There are no moving parts involved, no emissions generated and no maintenance required, just direct electricity generation,” said Professor Tom Scott of the University’s Interface Analysis Centre. “By encapsulating radioactive material inside diamonds, we ...
    Read full article: Diamond nuclear battery could generate 100μW for 5,000
  • Milestones and curiosities from The Engineer’s archives

    A newly published supplement examines The Engineer’s coverage of some of the biggest, and strangest, engineering stories of the past 160 years
    As you may have noticed, we’ve been celebrating a significant milestone over the past 12 months: The Engineer’s 160th birthday.
    Throughout the year, we’ve published a number of articles marking the astonishing industrial progress that’s been made since our launch in 1856.
    Our Victorian forbears would surely marvel at modern d
  • Elektra Awards 2016 – The Winners

    The Elektra European Electronics Industry Awards 2016 - find out the winners from the gala evening at the Grosvenor House Hotel, Park Lane.
    Read full article: Elektra Awards 2016 – The Winners
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  • Australia claims perovskite solar record

    The University of New South Wales is claiming an efficiency record for a ‘large’ (16cm2) perovskite solar cell. Announced that the Asia-Pacific Solar Research Conference in Canberra, 12.1%  was a chieved – “the largest single perovskite photovoltaic cell certified with the highest energy conversion efficiency. The new cell is at least 10 times bigger than ...
    Read full article: Australia claims perovskite solar record
  • Semefab gets £220,000 for equipment from Scottish Enterprise

    Glenrothes chip and MEMS fab Semefab is to get a £220,000 Regional Selective Assistance from Scottish Enterprise towards equipment “in a bid to increase efficiencies and pursue new technologies”, said the firm. According to Scottish Enterprise, the foundry’s investment will mean an injection of £1.25 million into the Scottish economy as the organisation improves cost-efficiency ...
    Read full article: Semefab gets £220,000 for equipment from Scottish Enterprise
  • Researchers 3D print working drone with embedded electronics

    Researchers at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have 3D printed a ready-to-fly drone with embedded electronics using an aerospace-grade material.The electronics were incorporated in the drone during the 3D printing process, which employs Stratasys’ ULTEM 9085, a high strength, lightweight FDM (fused deposition modelling) material certified for use in commercial aircraft.
    NTU’s Singapore Centre for 3D Printing (SC3DP) and Stratasys Asia Pacific, a subsidiary
  • Video of the week: Chernobyl’s giant new shelter moved into place

    Three decades after the Chernobyl nuclear disaster and following one of the world’s most ambitious engineering projects, the remains of the power plant’s destroyed reactor 4 have been safely enclosed.
    Standing 110m high, 250m wide, 150m long and weighing in at 30,000 tonnes, the so-called New Safe Confinement, thought to be the largest land-based structure ever built, was moved into place along purpose built tracks late last month (November, 2016).Designed and built by an intern
  • Comment: Holographic technology takes a step beyond AR and VR

    Javid Khan, of 3D holographic display company Holoxica, says that to create a "true" 3D experience, you need to take a step beyond AR and VR.
    Read full article: Comment: Holographic technology takes a step beyond AR and VR
  • Lux Live: Nichia claims efficiency record for production LED

    Based on tentative data, Nichia thinks it has a record-breaker on its hands with its 319A high-power LED, which is achieving 164 lm/W at 700mA (5,000K), a spokesman told Electronics weekly at the Lux Live show in London. The 3.5 x 3.5mm device is actually binned at 1,050mA (~3W), and is foot-print compatible with earlier ...
    Read full article: Lux Live: Nichia claims efficiency record for production LED
  • Flex Logix’ stitchable LUT blocks for SoCs

    Flex Logix is offering FPGA cores for TSMC’s 40nm, 28nm and 16nm processes, Flex Logic is a two and a half year-old start-up backed by $7.4 million of venture capital. he Flex Logix technology has the ability to stitch cores together and, with 49 linked 2,500 LUT cores, can put 100,000 LUTs on an SoC. ...
    Read full article: Flex Logix’ stitchable LUT blocks for SoCs
  • UK processor IP firms join in RISC-V ecosystem for IoT chips

    Four firms have partnered to offer a system on chip design platform for the RISC-V open source embedded processor. BaySand, Codasip, Codeplay and UltraSoC are offering an IoT development platform based on the RISC-V open processor instruction set architecture (ISA). Elements of the platform which was unveiled at the 5th RISC-V Workshop in California are: – BaySand’s foundational IP ...
    Read full article: UK processor IP firms join in RISC-V ecosystem for IoT chips
  • QuickLogic to license FPGA cores

    QuickLogic is to license its FPGA technology to SoC designers wanting hardware acceleration or reconfigurability. The FPGA core being licensed is ArcticPro eFPGA,. The initial foundry being used is GloFo, and the initial processes available are 65nm and 40nm with 22nm FD-SOI available next year. More foundries will be added next year. “With nearly three ...
    Read full article: QuickLogic to license FPGA cores
  • NIDays 2016: Future trends, technologies and engineers

    Future trends, technologies and engineers were the subjects for the keynote of NIDays 2016, National Instrument’s Graphical System Design Conference in London. “What keeps you engaged with engineering and science?”, asked Richard Roberts, Academic Marketing Engineer at NI. His answer was their ability to help create the future, and the keynote certainly offered plenty of ...
    Read full article: NIDays 2016: Future trends, technologies and engineers
  • SiC mosfet switches 1kV in TO-247 package

    Wolfspeed (part of Cree) has introduced a 1,000V silicon carbide mosfet. C3M0065100K is a 65mΩ device in a four-lead TO-247-4 package – it has a second source pin for the driver. “This package provides lower switching losses with minimal gate circuit ringing due to the Kelvin gate connection,” said Richardson RFPD, which is stocking the ...
    Read full article: SiC mosfet switches 1kV in TO-247 package
  • Shoe sensor adds dead-reckoning to GPS

    Raytheon UK has developed a positioning and navigation system that adds 3D dead-reckoning to global navigation satellite systems (GNSSs, GPS for example), allowing navigation inside buildings. Called ‘Strider’, it comes in two parts – a ‘boot-mounted unit’ (BMU) and a phone app. Inside the BMU are MEMS accelerometers, gyros and a pressure sensor (height). This ...
    Read full article: Shoe sensor adds dead-reckoning to GPS
  • LuxLive: Vebatim’s AR111 and linear source

    Verbatim used LuxLive in London to launch anti-glare AR111 retrofit LED bulbs and demonstrate a new range of linear LED products. Low glare is the big marketing point. “To avoid the uncomfortable glare, the lamps mimic the lighting effect of a traditional halogen lamp by emitting light indirectly via the reflector,” said the firm, which is ...
    Read full article: LuxLive: Vebatim’s AR111 and linear source
  • RS gets former Farnell exec as president

    Marianne Culver is the new president of RS Components. Culver is best known in the component distribution sector for the 10 years she spent at the RS rival, Premier Farnell, where she was director of supply chain/supplier management. Lindsley Ruth, CEO of Electrocomponents, believes Culver’s experience of global distribution is well suited to her new ...
    Read full article: RS gets former Farnell exec as president
  • Elektra Awards 2016

    Tomorrow evening is the date for the industry’s largest technology and business awards: the Elektra European Electronics Industry Awards 2016. These are the individual success stories and technical and business achievements which will be recognised and presented to an international audience at the Gala Dinner which takes place this Tursday, on 1 December 2016 at the Grosvenor House Hotel, Park ...
    Read full article: Elektra Awards 2016
  • Industry engagement must be part of the solution

    Stuart NathanFeatures Editor
    A 10 point plan from engineering company Laing O’Rourke to close the UK’s engineering skills gap displays an encouraging willingness on the company’s part to become part of the solution to the problem
    It’s become one of the clichés of the engineering sector that employers complain about the skills of graduates and school leavers. The Engineer has long held the view that this is disingenuous; employers have to take responsibility for th
  • Optical fibre probe differentiates breast cancer tissue from normal tissue

    Researchers have developed an optical fibre probe claimed to distinguish breast cancer tissue from normal tissue, an advance that could allow surgeons to be more precise when removing breast cancer.
    Dr. Erik Schartner demonstrates an experimental system of the optical fibre probe. (Credit: University of Adelaide)The device, developed at University of Adelaide, could help prevent follow-up surgery, which is currently needed for 15-20 per cent of breast cancer surgery patients where all the cancer
  • NIDays 2016: Industrial IoT routes itself into Time Sensitive Networking

    National Instruments outlines plans for supporting time sensitive networking for the deterministic handling of data over Ethernet for industrial IoT applications.
    Read full article: NIDays 2016: Industrial IoT routes itself into Time Sensitive Networking
  • Renishaw engineer receives Barnes Waldron Best Student Award

    A recent graduate and current CNC applications engineer at Renishaw has received the IMechE’s Barnes Waldron Best Student Award.Tom Silvey studied mechanical engineering at the University of South Wales and graduated with a First Class degree in 2016.
    Every year, the Barnes Waldron award is handed out to an outstanding undergraduate student who is an affiliate member of the IMechE and is studying towards an IMechE accredited degree.
    Tom, who has been employed by Renishaw for the past five
  • Car industry boss urges government to stay in single market

    The president of motor industry trade body the SMMT has warned that the sector faces a £4.5bn tariff threat if the UK leaves the European single market.
    Talking at the group’s annual dinner, Gareth Jones underlined the industry’s recent impressive growth and outlined the risks to investment and success if the benefits of the single market were lost.
    The UK government recently pledged to ensure that Nissan’s Sunderland plant remains competitive.New SMMT analysis suggests t
  • Printing makes tracks down to 0.13mm on flexi PET

    Molex can print silver flexible circuits on polyester (PET) substrates with tacks as narrow as 0.13mm (0.005in) spaced by as little as 0.13mm. And it has a way to attach fine-pitch ICs. “The process creates a viable, cost-effective alternative to traditional flexible circuits: etched copper traces on polyimide,” said the firm. “Polyimide is more expensive than ...
    Read full article: Printing makes tracks down to 0.13mm on flexi PET
  • Intel sets up autonomous car group

    Intel has set up a new group called the Automated Driving Group (ADG) led by Doug Davis and Kathy Winter. Today’s announcement comes after CEO Brian Krzanich announced a $250 million investment for autonomous driving. Intel is teaming with Delphi and Mobileye for Self-Driving Cars and cars based on the Intel solution are expected to ...
    Read full article: Intel sets up autonomous car group
  • X-Fab launches mixed-signal design contest

    X-FAB and efabless corporation have launched an open mixed-signal design challenge. The objective of this challenge is to give designers the opportunity to deliver a completed design IP for an ultra-low power voltage reference. The IP will be developed in X-FAB’s 350nm mixed-signal process with designers being granted access to the required models, design files ...
    Read full article: X-Fab launches mixed-signal design contest
  • In the air gesture control gets haptic feedback

    Touch control moves into mid-air gesture control with tactile feedback. Bastien Beauvois describes some of the techniques for designing haptic touch interfaces.
    Read full article: In the air gesture control gets haptic feedback
  • Precision magnetic field sensor hides many secrets

    Allegro Microsystems has crammed a awful lot of electronics into a small package for its latest programmable precision linear magnetic sensing IC  – which includes both diagnostics and ESD capacitors. Sensible fields range from ±40 to ±1,800G. Called A1342, the monolithic BiCMOS IC has includes: a Hall sensing element, Hall temperature-compensating circuitry (both sensitivity and ...
    Read full article: Precision magnetic field sensor hides many secrets
  • Precision linear magnetic field sensor hides many secrets

    Allegro Microsystems cramms a lot of electronics into a small package for its latest programmable precision linear magnetic sensing IC.
    Read full article: Precision linear magnetic field sensor hides many secrets
  • ‘Ice-wires’ at room temperature have potential for proton electronics

    Confining water inside carbon nanotubes changes its physical properties so much that it can be solid at 100°C. This discovery, while not fully understood, could lead to new advances in nanoelectronics.
    One of the few scientific facts that everybody knows is that water freezes at 0°C (32°F) and boils at 100°C (212°F). It slightly less well-known that these figures change depending on the pressure exerted on the water. Scientists have known for many years that confining water i
  • UK laser technology could help boost performance of Large Hadron Collider

    A laser-based process for modifying the surface of metals is to be used to help enhance the performance of the world’s biggest physics experiment: the Large Hadron Collider
    Jointly developed by researchers from the University of Dundee and the Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC), the technology – which is known as LESS (Laser Engineered Surface Structures) – could increase the range of experiments possible on the LHC by helping to clear the so-called “el
  • This week’s poll: collaborative research

    What are the biggest challenges to setting up and running collaborative research projects?
    A fortnight ago we invited the winners of our Collaborate to Innovate awards to present their winning projects at a conference, and today we feature a story about a striking piece of collaboration; automotive giants Ford, BMW, Volkswagen group and Daimler-Benz coming together to create a high-powered DC charging network for battery electric vehicles along long-distance travel routes in Europe. We all know
  • Auto giants come together for European charging network

    Some of the biggest names in the automotive industry are embarking on a joint venture to deliver a network of ultra-fast charging sites across Europe.BMW Group, Daimler AG, Ford Motor Company and Volkswagen Group with Audi and Porsche have signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) to create the high-powered DC charge network for electric vehicles (EVs). The infrastructure will provide power levels up to 350kW, with an initial rollout of 400 stations beginning in 2017. According to the consortiu
  • Last week’s poll: the 2016 Autumn Statement

    Last week Philip Hammond presented his Autumn Statement to the House of Commons, prompting The Engineer to canvass its readers on what they wanted to hear from the chancellor.
    A total of 41 per cent thought Hammond should prioritise public sector infrastructure, followed by 28 per cent who favoured a target of three per cent of GDP invested into R&D.
    Of the remaining 31 per cent, 12 per cent thought incentives for STEM careers access a priority, and six per cent thought a cut in fuel duty sh
  • Texplained opens Nice lab for IC analysis

    Three year-old French reverse-engineering and IC security analysis company Texplained of Sophia Antipolis, near Nice, has opened a new laboratory. The lab offers analyses of microchip security and helps companies protect ICs against counterfeiting and piracy. “Microchips are extremely vulnerable to security threats,” says Texplained CEO Olivier Thomas, “we approach, assess and solve microchip security ...
    Read full article: Texplained opens Nice lab for IC analysis
  • Kiwi lands first international internship at McLaren Automotive

    McLaren Automotive has awarded its first international internship to a mechatronics student from the University of Auckland in New Zealand.Following in the footsteps of the McLaren founder, Bruce McLaren, unrelated Andrew McLaren, a third-year student in the Faculty of Engineering studying Mechatronics Engineering, will spend nine weeks at the McLaren Technology Centre in Woking, working alongside the company’s Research and Development engineers.
    McLaren founder, Bruce McLaren, travelled t
  • TSMC introduces 12nm half-node

    TSMC is going to introduce a half-node process at 12nm, reports Digitimes. The 12nm process will have better leakage and be lower cost than 16nm. It is being reported that the half-node process is a competitive response to the 14nm processes of Samsung and GloFo. However GloFo announced. 12nm FD-SOI last month. “In a world ...
    Read full article: TSMC introduces 12nm half-node
  • Manchester grad leads the way with smart cane

    A PhD student at Manchester University is developing a white cane with embedded sensors that alerts visually impaired users to their surroundings.
    mySmartCane is the brainchild of Vasileios Tsormpatzoudis, from the University’s School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering. The prototype tool uses a low-cost embedded computer that functions in a similar way to a car parking sensor. An ultrasonic ball wirelessly measures the distance to approaching objects, converting the information into
  • Leti demonstrates qubit on CMOS wafer

    French research labs Leti and Inac have demonstrated a quantum-dot-based spin qubit using a CMOS process on a 300mm FDSoI wafer. The device, developed with the University of Grenoble Alpes, consists of a two-gate, p-type transistor with an un-doped channel. See University of Sussex quantum gate “Our one-qubit demonstrator brings CMOS technology closer to the emerging ...
    Read full article: Leti demonstrates qubit on CMOS wafer
  • Tidal clue to ocean warming

    Satellite technique could use internal tide data to track ocean temperature cheaply and without harming marine life, potentially improving climate modelling.
    Internal tides’ effect on surface height in the Atlantic ocean, measured between 1992 and 2012. Image: Zhongxiang Zhao. Image a is northbound waves; b is southbound.For scientists trying to monitor, model or predict climate change, accurate information about temperatures on the Earth are vital, and this just doesn’t just mean on
  • Productivity and skills continue to concern

    Jason Ford, news editor
    Most people agree that increased productivity is a good thing and last week the chancellor Philip Hammond underlined the Tories’ commitment to boosting output in his Autumn Statement.
    The announcement of a £23bn National Productivity Investment Fund – to be spent on innovation and infrastructure over the next five years – was generally well received and by the following day Hammond and his boss Theresa May were in Gloucestershire for a tour of Reni

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